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Marine & Freshwater Research is a multidisciplinary journal publishing original research and reviews on all aquatic environments and subject areas. More

Editor-in-Chief: Max Finlayson

 
 
 

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Published online 27 April 2015
Can top-down and bottom-up forces explain phytoplankton structure in a subtropical and shallow groundwater-connected lake? 
Diego Frau, Melina Devercelli, Susana José de Paggi, Pablo Scarabotti, Gisela Mayora, Yamila Battauz and Mariana Senn

Top down–bottom up is one of the major hypotheses that explain aquatic communities’ structure. In this study we aim to prove it in a subtropical shallow lake using phytoplankton as study object. We realised that phytoplankton is mainly regulated by hydrological changes that affect nutrient availability and predation. Evidence suggest that top down–bottom up model is not completely valid for shallow subtropical lakes where new models should be fashioned.

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Published online 27 April 2015
Long-term ecological trends of flow-dependent ecosystems in a major regulated river basin 
Matthew J. Colloff, Peter Caley, Neil Saintilan, Carmel A. Pollino and Neville D. Crossman

Analyses of ecological time series in the Murray–Darling Basin (1905–2013) indicated periods of decline and recovery according to cycles of drought and flood. Meta-analysis revealed a small, but statistically significant declining trend, consistent with a pattern of historical decline to a hybrid ecosystem followed by slow, recent decline for some components and stability for others.

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Published online 23 April 2015
Low survival rather than breeding success explains little penguin population decline on Granite Island 
Diane Colombelli-Négrel

Little penguin populations have been seriously declining across South Australia, for reasons still not fully understood. I investigated breeding performance and survival of little penguins on Granite Island for 17 years and found that both adult and sub-adult survivals were extremely low, with sub-adult survival being the most critical variable affecting population growth. Further investigation into factors influencing juvenile mortality is clearly needed, with a particular focus on food availability and parasites, which are known reasons for poor juvenile survival in other colonies.

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Published online 22 April 2015
Significant genetic structure despite high vagility revealed through mitochondrial phylogeography of an Australian freshwater turtle (Chelodina longicollis) 
K. Hodges, S. Donnellan and A. Georges

The turtle Chelodina longicollis is a freshwater obligate with strong overland dispersal capacity and adaptations to terrestriality – traits that connect populations and reduce divergence. Genetic results showed two ancient haplogroups partitioned either side of the Great Dividing Range, each with demographically stable subpopulations and signals of isolation by distance. These results demonstrate that that landscape history can overwhelm life-history traits even in a highly vagile species.

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Published online 22 April 2015
Phylogenetic diversity within the endemic brown trout Duero lineage: implications for conservation and management 
M. Vera, J. L. García-Marín, P. Martinez and C. Bouza

Populations from an endemic lineage out of its reported natural range difficult the management of species diversity. The phylogeny of mtDNA sequences demonstrated the natural origin of the brown trout populations of the Duero lineage outside the Duero basin, and refused its origin from recent human translocations. This lineage singularity into the north-western Iberian rivers will require differentiated management from Duero lineage populations inside the Duero basin.

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Published online 09 April 2015
Glassfish switch feeding from thalassinid larvae to crab zoeae after tidal inundation of saltmarsh 
Jack J. McPhee, Peter Freewater, William Gladstone, Margaret E. Platell and Maria J. Schreider

The release of free-swimming larvae (zoeae) by saltmarsh-dwelling crabs after tidal flooding of saltmarsh provides important food sources for estuarine fish, including glassfish. On ebbing tides in a temperate Australian estuary, glassfish fed on zoeae following saltmarsh flooding, but when tides flooded only the adjacent mudflats, ghost shrimp larvae were the main prey. The feeding of glassfish is therefore triggered by tidal action and the ingestion of prey is influenced by which coastal estuarine habitats are flooded by incoming tides

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Published online 09 April 2015
Electroreception in the obligate freshwater stingray, Potamotrygon motoro 
Lindsay L. Harris, Christine N. Bedore and Stephen M. Kajiura

Little is known about the sensitivity of freshwater elasmobranchs to minute electric fields produced by their prey. This study determined that the obligate freshwater stingray, Potamotrygon motoro, is up to 5 orders of magnitude less sensitive to electric fields than its marine relatives. Despite decreased electrosensitivity, P. motoro still successfully localises prey owing to multiple sensory systems working synergistically.

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Published online 09 April 2015
New opportunities for conservation of a threatened biogenic habitat: a worldwide assessment of knowledge on bivalve-reef representation in marine and coastal Ramsar Sites 
Tim Kasoar, Philline S. E. zu Ermgassen, Alvar Carranza, Boze Hancock and Mark Spalding

Bivalve reef has recently been listed under the Ramsar Convention (1971), thereby requiring reporting of its presence. The present study aimed to assess the current state of knowledge of bivalve reef represented in Ramsar Information Sheets, and found that only 2% of Sites reported the presence of bivalve reef, whereas 16% of Sites were identified using other data sources. These Sites should be a priority for surveys to confirm the presence or absence of this important marine habitat.

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Published online 09 April 2015
Range and habitat associations of the native macroalga Caulerpa filiformis in New South Wales, Australia 
Tim M. Glasby, Peter. T. Gibson, Gregory West, Peter Davies and Sofietje Voerman

The native seaweed Caulerpa filiformis has reportedly been spreading over rocky reefs throughout NSW. We document the extent of C. filiformis over 5 years and test whether the seaweed is associated with nutrient enrichment and particular habitat types. C. filiformis is predominately found where there is a mixture of rocky reefs and beaches and is not closely associated with human activities or nutrient levels over large areas.

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Published online 07 April 2015
Reproductive capacity of a marine species (Octopus tetricus) within a recent range extension area 
Jorge E. Ramos, Gretta T. Pecl, Jayson M. Semmens, Jan M. Strugnell, Rafael I. León and Natalie A. Moltschaniwskyj

Marine species undertaking range shifts in response to environmental change must produce viable gametes and their offspring must survive in new areas. Examination of reproductive characteristics suggests that Octopus tetricus can reproduce and the population may be self-sustainable within its new range in south-eastern Australia. The reproductive biology of O. tetricus may thus facilitate the establishment and prevalence of the population in the new environments.

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Published online 07 April 2015
Effects of gear type, entrance size and soak time on trap efficiency for freshwater crayfish Cherax destructor and C. albidus 
Paul Brown, Taylor L. Hunt and Khageswor Giri

We aimed to compare relative efficiencies of six gears where an array of restrictive recreational fishing regulations are in place for freshwater crayfish. Open topped traps and those fitted with fixed entrance rings, to reduce by-catch entry, were most efficient particularly when fished actively with short soak-times. Encouragingly, fixed entrance rings didn’t affect catch efficiency or size-structure.

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Published online 07 April 2015
Importance of predation and viral lysis for bacterial mortality in a tropical western Indian coral-reef ecosystem (Toliara, Madagascar) 
M. Bouvy, P. Got, Y. Bettarel, T. Bouvier, C. Carré, C. Roques, M. Rodier, J. C. Lope and R. Arfi

Viral lysis may be a major cause of mortality and, at times, comparable to grazing-induced mortality. We compare the two distinct processes of bacterial mortality in two different trophic conditions using natural populations. Changes in nutrient concentrations can play an important role in the balance between viral lysis and heterotrophic nanoflagellate grazing in the bacterial mortality.

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Published online 01 April 2015
Variability in the growth, feeding and condition of barramundi (Lates calcarifer Bloch) in a northern Australian coastal river and impoundment 
D. J. Russell, F. E. Thomson, P. A. Thuesen, T. N. Power and R. J. Mayer

Growth of stocked and wild Lates calcarifer in some north Queensland habitats was both seasonal and prey-dependent. In the lower, freshwater Johnstone River, where larger prey appeared depauperate, L. calcarifer grew slower relative to those in downstream estuarine and adjacent coastal areas and in nearby Lake Tinaroo. Growth of L. calcarifer was highly seasonal with marked declines during the cooler months.

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Published online 01 April 2015
River metabolism and carbon dynamics in response to flooding in a lowland river 
Robert A. Cook, Ben Gawne, Rochelle Petrie, Darren S. Baldwin, Gavin N. Rees, Daryl L. Nielsen and Nathan S. P. Ning

Floodwater returning from floodplains can contain large amounts of carbon, but it’s not well understood whether or not this carbon is involved in the carbon budgets of rivers. We examined carbon dynamics upstream and downstream of a river red gum forest, before and after a flood inundated the forest and returned to the river. The flood waters led to a major increase in the carbon budget of the river and the carbon was processed by riverine biofilms, showing carbon from the floodplain can fuel river foodwebs.

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Published online 01 April 2015
Sea-surface temperature used to predict the relative density of giant Pacific octopuses (Enteroctopus dofleini) in intertidal habitats of Prince William Sound, Alaska 
D. Scheel

I used targeted visual surveys to study giant Pacific octopuses, Enteroctopus dofleini, an important by-catch species in pot fisheries in Alaska. I found a significant negative correlation of octopus counts with winter sea-surface temperatures over the past 30 months. Environmental variables affecting recruitment together with visual surveys may allow better prediction of trends in octopus abundance than by-catch statistics.

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Published online 01 April 2015
The association between coral communities and disease assemblages in the Wakatobi Marine National Park, south-eastern Sulawesi, Indonesia 
J. Haapkylä, J. Melbourne-Thomas and M. Flavell

The Coral Triangle, including Indonesia, is a hotspot for coral reef diversity, but the effects of coral disease in this region are poorly understood. This study reports changes in coral cover and disease prevalence in a remote part of Indonesia, and relates these changes to features of the coral community. Declines in coral cover and increases in both the number of diseases and overall disease prevalence over a 7-year period underlie potential changes in coral communities in this biodiversity hotspot.

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Published online 01 April 2015
Spatial and temporal habitat use by white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) at an aggregation site in southern New Zealand 
Malcolm P. Francis, Clinton Duffy and Warrick Lyon

White sharks aggregating at fur seal colonies near Stewart Island, southern New Zealand, were tagged to identify their temporal and spatial patterns of occupancy, and to inform management measures that aim to separate sharks from fishing effort. White sharks were present from late summer to early winter, peaking in autumn (March–June). The population comprised mainly subadult and adult males and subadult females, and individual sharks showed fine-scale spatial and temporal variability in abundance. These sharks travel well beyond their aggregation sites, but the behaviour and dynamics of white sharks in other parts of New Zealand remain poorly understood.

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Published online 01 April 2015
Resilience to climate change: complex relationships among wetland hydroperiod, larval amphibians and aquatic predators in temporary wetlands 
Katrin Lowe, J. Guy Castley and Jean-Marc Hero

The environmental factors influencing breeding of a temporary wetland breeding frog (Litoria olongburensis) from eastern Australia were examined. The species showed breeding flexibility in response to highly variable and unpredictable rainfall conditions. This flexibility may reflect an adaptive capacity to predicted changes in frequency and reliability of precipitation as a result of climate change, and may apply to other temporary wetland species.

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Published online 19 March 2015
High clonality in Acropora palmata and Acropora cervicornis populations of Guadeloupe, French Lesser Antilles 
A. Japaud, C. Bouchon, J.-L. Manceau and C. Fauvelot

In Guadeloupe, the two endangered Acropora species are critically declining, like in the rest of Caribbean reefs. While examining the genetic status of two main remnant populations, we found an extremely high clonality in both species. This is alarming in the context of ongoing global warming as long periods of clonal growth without sexual recruitment may lead to the extinction of these populations.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Soft bodies make estimation hard: correlations among body dimensions and weights of multiple species of sea cucumbers 
James Prescott, Shijie Zhou and Andhika P. Prasetyo

Sound management of sea cucumber fisheries requires biological information including body measurements. We used hierarchical Bayesian errors-in-variables models to establish correlations among three types of weight measures and two body dimensions. The results can be applied to sea cucumbers in other areas and can be useful for data standardisation and size-based fisheries management.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Mobulid ray by-catch in longline fisheries in the south-western Atlantic Ocean 
F. Mas, R. Forselledo and A. Domingo

This paper presents the first by-catch assessment of mobulid rays in pelagic longline fisheries over the south-western Atlantic. At least two species were indentified and, although by-catch frequency was low, some uncertainties remained regarding their post-capture mortality. This work sheds light on mobulids’ interaction with longline fisheries, expands known distribution ranges, and raises concern about the potential effect of these fisheries on mobulid populations.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Artificial irrigation ponds and sea coast as foraging habitat for larids breeding in protected wetlands 
Esther Sebastián-González, Francisco Botella, Otso Ovaskainen, Antonio Delgado and José Antonio Sánchez-Zapata

Questions related to the preservation of foraging sites of breeding birds have received little attention, although they can be of major importance for population persistence. Here, we used stable isotopes and field observations to evaluate the relative importance of man-made irrigation ponds as foraging areas for a larid community of conservation concern. Our study showed that larids breeding in mixed colonies segregate spatially in their foraging niche between marine and freshwater environments. Both breeding and foraging habitats need to be addressed when analysing larid population dynamics and conservation strategies.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Patterns of connectivity and population structure of the southern calamary Sepioteuthis australis in southern Australia 
Timothy M. Smith, Corey P. Green and Craig D. H. Sherman

Southern calamary are an important fisheries species and understanding levels of connectivity across their distribution is important for management purposes. Genetic discrimination techniques suggested that there is a high level of gene flow and connectivity throughout their distribution. Such results indicate the southern calamary population has the potential to maintain a level of resilience to altering conditions if large scale mixing is maintained.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Year-round maturity of the chaetognath Aidanosagitta regularis in the Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand 
Wesley H. Webb and Mary A. Sewell

The reproductive biology of planktonic chaetognaths is poorly known, particularly with regard to the importance of seasonal factors. We undertook a year of semilunar plankton sampling in the Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand, to survey sexual maturity of Aidanosagitta regularis; surprisingly, breeding of A. regularis appeared unconstrained by seasonal factors, as reproductively mature individuals were available year-round. This has implications for embryological study of the chaetognaths.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Lake Eyre golden perch (Macquaria sp.) spawning and recruitment is enhanced by flow events in the hydrologically variable rivers of Lake Eyre Basin, Australia 
B. J. Cockayne, D. Sternberg, D. W. Schmarr, A. W. Duguid and R. Mathwin

Understanding the links between fish recruitment and riverine flows is integral for setting priorities for river-management strategies. We found that within-channel flow events soon after months of no-flow were important spawning triggers for the endemic Lake Eyre golden perch (Macquaria sp.). Subsequent fish recruitment was also strongly associated with the number of flow-events per year. These results highlight the importance of maintaining the naturally variable flow regime of Australia’s arid- and semi-arid zone rivers.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Behavioural responses to simulated bird attacks in marine three-spined sticklebacks after exposure to high CO2 levels 
Joacim Näslund, Erik Lindström, Floriana Lai and Fredrik Jutfelt

Ocean acidification (OA), caused by increased levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the sea water, has previously been reported to affect the behaviour of fishes. Here, we find that some behaviours (lateralisation and freezing) were affected by OA in three-spined sticklebacks, but the general response to a bird predator (spatial avoidance) was not affected. Thus, the general avoidance behaviour appears to be robust to elevated CO2 levels, despite some behaviours being altered.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Activity, substrate selection, and effect of a simulated Amazon flood regime on the behaviour of the apple snail, Pomacea bridgesii 
Timoteo Tadashi Watanabe, Gustavo Yomar Hattori and Bruno Sampaio Sant'Anna

The present study investigated the behaviour of the apple snail Pomacea bridgesii on a simulated flood-pulse water regime. The results show that there are differences between day and night behaviours (activity and substrate selection). There were also differences between behaviours in dry and maximum water-level periods. Therefore, the floodplain regime influences the activity of P. brigesii displaying adaptations to minimise water loss.

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Published online 19 March 2015
Temperature, length of growth season and phytoplankton abundance in the Gulf of Maine 
Knut Seip

Does global warming of the sea surface decrease or increase phytoplankton abundance? This paper shows that, although within-season phytoplankton abundance decreases with increasing water temperature, annual average phytoplankton abundance increases with average water temperature, likely because an increase of 1°C lengthens the growth season by ~20 days. However, it is not known if higher annual average phytoplankton abundance translates into larger stocks of zooplankton and fish.

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Published online 19 March 2015
The influence of water quality on hyporheic invertebrate communities in agricultural catchments 
Samuel Kibichii, Hugh B. Feeley, Jan-Robert Baars and Mary Kelly-Quinn

Understanding the role of agriculture in water quality and river health is vital. This study investigated the effect of agricultural run-off on the chemical and biological status of the hyporheic zone, and indicates that hyporheic zones are degraded in intensely farmed catchments. These findings emphasise the importance of holistic catchment management in the protection and sustainability of freshwater systems.

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Published online 18 March 2015
Spatial variation in life-history traits of Oithona spp. in a shallow temperate estuarine system (Río de la Plata, south-west Atlantic) during spring 
G. D. Cepeda, R. P. Di Mauro, M. C. Hozbor, D. Cucchi Colleoni, D. Hernández and M. D. Viñas

Oithona nana and O. helgolandica population dynamics and the influence of physical and trophic factors were studied at an estuarine system. O. nana proliferates near river runoff, mainly because a retention mechanism and a potential ecological advantage of this species denoted in body size and egg number and size. O. helgolandica populations did not increase in this system.

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Published online 18 March 2015
Breeding habitat selection in an obligate beach bird: a test of the food resource hypothesis 
Anna Cuttriss, Grainne S. Maguire, Glenn Ehmke and Michael A. Weston

One beach is not the same as another as far as a beach nesting-bird, the Hooded Plover, is concerned. They breed in sites with more invertebrate prey, and which have different assemblages of prey species, compared with sites where they do not breed. Thus, beaches apparently vary in terms of their ability to support this threatened bird species.

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Published online 18 March 2015
Influence of boat anchoring on Pinna nobilis: a field experiment using mimic units 
Maite Vázquez-Luis, Joseph A. Borg, Carlos Morell, Gàlia Banach-Esteve and Salud Deudero

The effect of boat anchoring on the Mediterranean endemic bivalve Pinna nobilis was assessed experimentally in the field by deploying non-biological mimic units. Boat anchoring influence was three times higher in affected than in control areas, having also an adverse effect on Posidonia oceanica meadows. Moreover, lower values of natural P. nobilis density and size classes were recorded from the affected areas.

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Published online 13 March 2015
Community structure of reef fishes on a remote oceanic island (St Peter and St Paul’s Archipelago, equatorial Atlantic): the relative influence of abiotic and biotic variables 
Osmar J. Luiz, Thiago C. Mendes, Diego R. Barneche, Carlos G. W. Ferreira, Ramon Noguchi, Roberto C. Villaça, Carlos A. Rangel, João L. Gasparini and Carlos E. L. Ferreira

Reef-fish communities on large coral-reef systems are incredible complex; in contrast, isolated oceanic islands represent an opportunity to understand processes on ecologically simpler ecosystems. This study investigated the reef-fish community of the world’s smallest tropical oceanic island and found that environmental drivers, especially depth, are more important than biotic interactions in its organisation, probably because of low species-richness. The low-species richness translates in low functional redundancy, indicating that remote islands may be more vulnerable to human impacts than interconnected reef systems.

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Published online 13 March 2015
Biomonitoring of the environmental contamination by organotins in the Gulf of Tunis: occurrence of imposex in Stramonita haemastoma (Linnaeus, 1767) 
Wafa Boulajfene, Jihen Boukhicha, Alan Deidun, Daniela Berto, Teresa Romeo, Oum Kalthoum Ben Hassine and Sabiha Tlig-Zouari

Imposex is mainly caused by organotins’ accumulation in gastropods tissues. This research aimed to study the imposex in of Stramonita haemastoma individuals collected along the rocky coastline of the Gulf of Tunis. Sexual modifications occurred to different degrees in all stations essentially close to harbours. An inverse relationship between the distances from harbours and the occurrence of imposex was observed.

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Published online 10 March 2015
Important sources of variation to be considered when using fin clips as a surrogate for muscle in trophic studies using stable isotopes 
David E. Galván, Manuela Funes, Ana L. Liberoff, Florencia Botto and Oscar O. Iribarne

Sampling muscle is the prevalent technique for stable isotope analysis in fish and typically involves the death of the individuals. Fin-clipping is a non-lethal, easy-to-implement sampling technique that preserves fish welfare. This study assessed the suitability of caudal fin as a replacement for muscle in trophic studies. Results support the use of caudal fin as a surrogate for muscle but also showed that fin-muscle relationship varies among species and it is affected by fish size.

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Published online 10 March 2015
Mesozooplankton community in a seasonally hypoxic and highly eutrophic bay 
Min-Chul Jang, Kyoungsoon Shin, Pung-Guk Jang, Woo-Jin Lee and Keun-Hyung Choi

Low summer oxygen in a highly eutrophic and seasonally hypoxic coastal bay was attributed to high phytoplankton stocks, together with high temperature and stratification of the water column. A distinct mesozooplankton community was identified in summer of large freshwater discharge. The abundance of a marine cladoceran was positively related to oxygen levels, suggesting that hypoxic conditions may have lethal or sublethal effects.

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Published online 10 March 2015
Temporal dynamics of allochthonous coarse particulate organic matter in a subtropical Atlantic rainforest Brazilian stream 
Leonardo Kleba Lisboa, Aurea Luiza Lemes da Silva, Ana Emilia Siegloch, José Francisco Gonçalves Júnior and Mauricio Mello Petrucio

We quantified and identified the allochthonous leaf litter entering a headwater Atlantic Rain Forest stream throughout 1 year. We found that most organic matter entered the stream by a lateral input pathway, driven mainly by precipitation, as well as by changes to the leaf litter input of tree species throughout the year.

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Published online 10 March 2015
Water level decrease and increased water stability promotes phytoplankton growth in a mesotrophic subtropical lake 
Eduardo V. Fuentes and Mauricio M. Petrucio

Understanding the mechanisms that favour increase in phytoplankton biomass and bloom formation in freshwater ecosystems is a major challenge for managers and researchers, especially in environments dominated by cyanobacteria. Based on 5 years of observation, our study evaluated the importance of climatic factors in determining environmental conditions such as water level and mixing regime in a subtropical lake used for public water supply. The results show the importance of daily stratifications events for the accumulation of phytoplankton biomass.

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Published online 25 February 2015
Evidence for a broad-scale decline in giant Australian cuttlefish (Sepia apama) abundance from non-targeted survey data 
Thomas A. A. Prowse, Bronwyn M. Gillanders, Barry W. Brook, Anthony J. Fowler, Karina C. Hall, Michael A. Steer, Camille Mellin, N. Clisby, Jason E. Tanner, Tim M. Ward and Damien A. Fordham

The breeding aggregation of the giant Australian cuttlefish (Sepia apama) in northern Spencer Gulf, Southern Australia, has declined dramatically since the turn of the century. Our analysis of long-term by-catch and harvest records for the population indicated that this trend was not due to the failure of the species to aggregate, nor due to the aggregation occurring elsewhere, but was part of a systemic decline in the abundance of the population over this period. We evaluated a suite of potential climatic and harvest-related stressors for this species but could not attribute this decline in abundance to specific causes.

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Published online 25 February 2015
Re-evaluation of the diversity and distribution of diazotrophs in the South China Sea by pyrosequencing the nifH gene 
Peng Xiao, Yongguang Jiang, Yang Liu, Wenhua Tan, Wenhua Li and Renhui Li

In this study, pyrosequencing was used to investigate the diversity and composition of putative diazotrophs in the South China Sea. The result showed that Trichodesmium and γ-proteobacteria were the two dominant species among the putative N2-fixing microorganism community. The predominance of the two genotypes in the South China Sea contributed to low diversity of putative diazotrophs.

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Published online 25 February 2015
The dynamics of attached and free-living bacterial population in tropical coastal waters 
Siew Wen Lee, Choon Weng Lee, Chui Wei Bong, Kumaran Narayanan and Edmund Ui-Hang Sim

Attached bacteria can play a major role in carbon and nutrient cycling but their importance differs among habitats. We investigated the dynamics of attached and free-living bacteria in the coastal waters of Malaysia, and found that attached bacteria formed a larger fraction of total bacteria in eutrophic relative to oligotrophic waters, and showed a preference for chlorophyll-a based particles.

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Published online 25 February 2015
Food preferences of the estuarine crab Sesarma catenata estimated through laboratory experiments 
Leandro Bergamino and Nicole B. Richoux

Laboratory feeding-preference experiments showed that the estuarine crab Sesarma catenata preferred decomposed leaves of terrestrial riparian trees, followed by decomposed and mature leaves of the marshgrass Spartina maritima. The relative low carbon : nitrogen ratios of S. maritima and high bacterial production associated with decomposed terrestrial leaves may explain the trophic behaviour of S. catenata.

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Published online 25 February 2015
Marine plastic pollution: using community science to address a global problem 
Paul. E. Duckett and Vincenzo Repaci

Plastic pollution has become a global problem for marine ecosystems in recent decades. However, to resolve this environmental disaster will require changing the attitudes and lifestyles of people. Here we engaged a community to highlight the high levels of plastics that exist on their local beaches in an attempt to inspire local change.

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Published online 19 February 2015
Dissolved organic carbon characteristics in an acidified groundwater-dependent ecosystem 
Azra Mat Daud, Suzanne McDonald and Carolyn E. Oldham

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays an important role in groundwater-dependent wetlands, through its ability to mediate microbial processes and therefore the fate of pollutants. This work explores the effect of acidity on the structure of DOC, which in turn affects its reactivity. We have shown that the DOC structure is highly variable in both space and time, and dependent on local hydrology.

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Published online 19 February 2015
Effects of benthic substrate, nutrient enrichment and predatory fish on freshwater crayfish (kōura, Paranephrops planifrons) population characteristics in seven Te Arawa (Rotorua) lakes, North Island, New Zealand 
I. A. Kusabs, J. M. Quinn and D. P. Hamilton

Populations of kōura, or freshwater crayfish (Paranephrops planifrons), were quantified along a eutrophication gradient in seven Te Arawa lakes using the tau kōura, a traditional Māori harvesting method. Our results suggest that benthic substrate is more important in determining kōura population abundance than nutrient enrichment (using chlorophyll-a as a proxy) or predatory fish (rainbow trout abundance). Lake trophic status in conjunction with lake morphology appeared to indirectly affect kōura distribution in the sheltered, steep sided lakes, through hypolimnetic deoxygenation.

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Published online 19 February 2015
Development of habitat prediction models to reduce by-catch of sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus) within the purse-seine fishery in the eastern Pacific Ocean 
Raul O. Martinez-Rincon, Sofia Ortega-Garcia, Juan G. Vaca-Rodriguez and Shane P. Griffiths

By-catch has been considered as a main issue that may compromise suitability in marine ecosystems. In this work we propose a habitat prediction model approach to mitigate by-catch of sailfish based on spatial and environmental. Our results show that this approach may be considered as an additional fisheries management tool that may be used to support temporary spatial-temporal closure to reduce sailfish by-catch.

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Published online 19 February 2015
Residency and movement dynamics of southern rock lobster (Jasus edwardsii) after a translocation event 
Adrian Linnane, Shane Penny, Peter Hawthorne and Matthew Hoare

Lobsters translocated from an offshore (>100-m depth) to two inshore sites (<20-m depth) in South Australia were largely resident but occasionally, highly directed movement was observed in some individuals. Where movement was observed, it was highly directional in a south-west bearing from inshore to offshore sites. Female lobsters travelled significantly further than males.

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Published online 04 February 2015
Does the telemetry technology matter? Comparing estimates of aquatic animal space-use generated from GPS-based and passive acoustic tracking 
Ross G. Dwyer, Hamish A. Campbell, Terri R. Irwin and Craig E. Franklin

Underwater passive acoustic telemetry and satellite telemetry are key technologies for observing aquatic animal movements. Using a dual-tagging approach, we show that estimates of travel distance, home range and the conclusions reached can vary according to the technology by which these data were obtained. This study provides recommendations and methodologies whereby telemetry technology biases may be quantified and minimised.

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    | Supplementary Material (1.6 MB)
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Published online 04 February 2015
Geographic variation in long-term trajectories of change in coral recruitment: a global-to-local perspective 
P. J. Edmunds, R. Steneck, R. Albright, R. C. Carpenter, A. P. Y. Chui, T.-Y. Fan, S. Harii, H. Kitano, H. Kurihara, L. Legendre, S. Mitarai, S. Muko, Y. Nozawa, J. Padilla-Gamino, N. N. Price, K. Sakai, G. Suzuki, M. J. H. van Oppen, A. Yarid and R. D. Gates

The declining cover of stony corals on tropical reefs is at the centre of the coral reef crisis, and while much is known about the factors killing corals, little is known about the factors determining their ability to replace themselves. In this paper we exploit four well-studied coral reef locations in the Caribbean and Pacific to evaluate the role of long-term variation in coral recruitment and the success of young corals in driving changes in coral cover. Our results reveal dramatic differences among locations in the capacity of corals to replace themselves through sexual reproduction (i.e. post-settlement success), with these effects probably playing an important role in determining the rate at which coral cover is lost (or gained) on present-day reefs.

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    | Supplementary Material (283 KB)
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Published online 30 January 2015
Differences in the macrozoobenthic fauna colonising empty bivalve shells before and after invasion by Corbicula fluminea 
M. I. Ilarri, A. T. Souza, V. Modesto, L. Guilhermino and R. Sousa

Little is known about the effect of different shell morphologies on the macrozoobenthic community. The associated fauna did not vary among empty shells of four bivalve species. The invasive species C. fluminea shells partially replaced the role of empty shells of native species as a physical substratum.

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Published online 30 January 2015
pH-dependent toxicity of serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors in taxonomically diverse freshwater invertebrate species 
Rumya Sundaram, Bradley W. Smith and Thomas M. Clark

The toxicity of three antidepressants in diverse freshwater species was positively correlated with ambient pH, and varied among drugs and taxa. The environmental impact of these pollutants thus becomes greater as pH increases, and is greater in habitats containing sensitive species. The results suggest that sublethal effects will also be influenced by ambient pH, and other psychotropic amine drugs will behave in a similar way.

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Published online 30 January 2015
Feeding niche preference of the mudsnail Peringia ulvae 
Cristiano V. M. Araújo, Matilde Moreira-Santos, Joana Patrício, Irene Martins, Ignacio Moreno-Garrido, Julián Blasco, João C. Marques and Rui Ribeiro

The decline of seagrass beds has been accelerated by opportunistic macroalgae blooms. The feeding behaviour of mudsnail Peringia ulvae was studied with the aim of assessing its potential role in preventing the occurrence of macroalgal blooms. Snails grazed on all opportunistic macroalgae tested; however, sediment was the feeding niche preferred. Therefore, the hypothesis that P. ulvae has a role in preventing macroalgal blooms was not supported.

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    | Supplementary Material (203 KB)
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Published online 30 January 2015
Movement patterns and habitat use of juvenile mangrove whiprays (Himantura granulata) 
Lauren E. Davy, Colin A. Simpfendorfer and Michelle R. Heupel

Understanding the movements and space use of animals is necessary to identify vital habitats and better manage vulnerable species. We used acoustic telemetry to examine movement patterns of juvenile Himantura granulata in an intertidal bay. The majority of rays remained within the intertidal bay for the entire monitoring period, demonstrating the importance of intertidal habitats to H. granulata. Rays exhibited refuging behaviour in mangrove and reef habitats, suggesting that predation risk may be a principal factor influencing the movement of small rays.

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Published online 30 January 2015
Repairing Australia's estuaries for improved fisheries production – what benefits, at what cost? 
Colin Creighton, Paul I. Boon, Justin D. Brookes and Marcus Sheaves

With Australia's narrow continental shelf, Australia's estuaries, embayments and coastal waters are essential to fisheries productivity and marine biodiversity. Yet these are our most degraded ecosystems. This Business Case demonstrates that an investment in repair of $350 million would be repaid just from increased value of commercial fish catch in less than 5 years – probably a far greater return on investment than any of Australia's previous environmental initiatives.

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Published online 30 January 2015
Age and size compositions, habitats, growth and reproductive characteristics of a terapontid (Pelates octolineatus) in coastal waters 
Lauren Veale, Peter Coulson, Norman Hall, Alex Hesp and Ian C. Potter

On the lower Western Australian coast, the terapontid Pelates octolineatus uses seagrass as a nursery area during the first year of life, and then moves out into sparser seagrass in deeper waters, where it matures at the end of its second year of life at total lengths (TL) of 140–170 mm. This species attained a maximum TL of ~256 mm and maximum age of 10 years. A sine-based growth curve emphasised that growth is seasonal and instantaneous growth rates were shown to peak in the warm summer months and to decline in amplitude with age. Gonadal recrudescence occurs in early spring as water temperature and day length increases and spawning peaks in late-spring to mid-summer when water temperatures are approaching their maxima.

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    | Supplementary Material (365 KB)
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Published online 30 January 2015
Barcoding deep-water chondrichthyans from mainland Portugal 
T. Moura, M. C. Silva and I. Figueiredo

DNA barcodes were used to identify deep-water chondrichthyans occurring off Portugal mainland. Cytochrome c oxidase I proved to be adequate for species identification, with almost all putative species analysed (Chimaeriformes, Hexanchiformes, Squaliformes, Carcharhiniformes and Lamniformes), recovered as well supported monophyletic clades. Results suggest that three different Centrophorus species occur off the Portuguese mainland, C. saquamosus, C. granulosus and C. uyato.

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Published online 30 January 2015
Digging up the dirty past: evidence for stormwater 
Anna Lintern, Ana Deletic, Paul Leahy and David McCarthy

This study uses sediment cores from a floodplain lake to identify the effect of residential development on heavy metal inputs into aquatic systems. We find that the stormwater from residential areas can be an important contributor to heavy metal contamination of aquatic systems. Therefore, future residential development should incorporate stormwater treatment tools to protect aquatic environments from degradation.

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    | Supplementary Material (1.4 MB)
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Published online 30 January 2015
Out in the wash: spatial ecology of a temperate marine shallow rocky-reef species derived using acoustic telemetry 
Jerom R. Stocks, Charles A. Gray and Matthew D. Taylor

Characterising the movement and habitat affinities of fish is a fundamental component in understanding the functioning of marine ecosystems. Acoustic telemetry was employed at two coastal temperate rocky-reefs in south-east Australia to examine the movements, spatial utilisation and residency of the herbivorous teleost Girella elevata. Spatial metrics of habitat use highlighted the susceptibility of G. elevata to recreational fishing pressure. Such studies are providing important data for spatial management measures such as marine protected areas and increasing our understanding of the latitudinal interactions of fish populations.

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Published online 30 January 2015
Land use structures fish assemblages in reservoirs of the Tennessee River 
L. E. Miranda, J. M. Bies and D. A. Hann

Inputs of nutrients, sediments and detritus from catchments can promote selected components of reservoir fish assemblages, while hindering others. We compared fish assemblages in reservoirs of two sub-basins of the Tennessee River representing differing intensities of agricultural development, and hypothesised that fish assemblage structure indicated by species percentage composition would differ among reservoirs in the two sub-basins. We observed a shift from an invertivore-based fish assemblage in forested catchments to a detritivore-based fish assemblage in agricultural catchments that may be a widespread pattern among reservoirs and other aquatic ecosystems.

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blank image Marine and Freshwater Research
Volume 66 Number 5 2015

 
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Age and growth of the white shark, Carcharodon carcharias, in the western North Atlantic Ocean 
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Lisa J. Natanson and Gregory B. Skomal
pp. 387-398

Accurate age estimates are essential for the sustainable management and conservation of all fish populations, including sharks. In this study, we use vertebral band counts coupled with bomb carbon validation to estimate the age and growth of white sharks in the western North Atlantic. Our findings indicate that this species grows significantly slower and lives considerably longer than previously thought.

   | Supplementary Material (412 KB)
 

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Diversity in immature-shark communities along a tropical coastline 
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Peter M. Yates, Michelle R. Heupel, Andrew J. Tobin, Stephen K. Moore and Colin A. Simpfendorfer
pp. 399-410

Fishery-independent surveys were undertaken to investigate shark communities along ~400 km of the tropical eastern coast of Australia. Multivariate analyses identified significant spatial heterogeneity in immature-shark communities. Results demonstrated that data on nursery function from restricted areas may not accurately portray patterns occurring over broader geographic scales, and this diversity may provide population-level benefits for sharks.

 
    | Supplementary Material (545 KB)
 

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Atypical correlation of otolith strontium : calcium and barium : calcium across a marine–freshwater life history transition of a diadromous fish 
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Paul Hamer, Angela Henderson, Michael Hutchison, Jodie Kemp, Corey Green and Pierre Feutry
pp. 411-419

Inferring fish movements between marine and freshwater from otolith chemistry generally assumes that the strontium : calcium ratio is positively related to salinity and the barium : calcium ratio negatively related. This study of jungle perch (Kuhlia rupestris) provides an example where both otolith strontium : calcium and barium : calcium increased upon transition from marine to freshwater. While this atypical result driven by variation in ambient calcium challenges the above assumption, variation in the otolith element : calcium ratios remained consistent with variation in the ambient ratios.

 
  
 

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Age and growth of sharptooth catfish, Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822) (Clariidae), in the Lower Okavango Delta, Botswana 
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Thethela Bokhutlo, Olaf L. F. Weyl, Ketlhatlogile Mosepele and G. Glenn Wilson
pp. 420-428

Managing any inland fishery requires reliable age data and accurate estimates of growth rate. We used otolith-derived age estimates to compare patterns of age and growth for Clarias gariepinus from the Lower Okavango Delta in northern Botswana to those from the Upper Delta and found that two distinct populations of C. gariepinus may exist between the two regions. The fairly short life span and high variability in growth of C. gariepinus in the Lower Okavango Delta are important indicators that it is imperative to maintain natural habitat and flow regime for sustainable management of fishery resources in flood pulsed ecosystems.

 
  
 

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The influence of an offshore artificial reef on the abundance of fish in the surrounding pelagic environment 
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Molly E. Scott, James A. Smith, Michael B. Lowry, Matthew D. Taylor and Iain M. Suthers
pp. 429-437

Underwater video was used to observe the fish assemblage surrounding an offshore artificial reef, in Sydney, Australia. We found up to 10 times more fish on the reef itself than at 30, 100 and 500 m from the reef. This suggests that artificial reefs are very effective at increasing fish abundance, but generally act on a localised scale (<30 m).

 
    | Supplementary Material (390 KB)
 

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Linkages between reach-scale physical habitat and invertebrate assemblages in upland streams 
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Victoria S. Milner, Nigel J. Willby, David J. Gilvear and Charles Perfect
pp. 438-448

In minimally disturbed river systems, identifying the influence of physical habitat on biological structure is important if the effects of alterations to physical habitat are to be understood. This study determined whether four channel types in an existing process-based geomorphic typology had distinct physical habitat and macroinvertebrate community composition. The findings reveal geomorphic typing of rivers can provide an initial assessment of ecological status and physical habitat conditions.

   |        Open Access Article
 

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Plant litter diversity affects invertebrate shredder activity and the quality of fine particulate organic matter in streams 
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Isabel Fernandes, Sofia Duarte, Fernanda Cássio and Cláudia Pascoal
pp. 449-458

We tested how loss of litter diversity and time after loss of diversity affect leaf breakdown by invertebrate shredders. Changes in plant litter diversity affected shredders activity (leaf consumption and FPOM production), and the quality of food resources (FPOM and shredders) to higher trophic levels in streams; such effects are likely to become stronger with time after loss of diversity.

 
    | Supplementary Material (339 KB)
 

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Small-scale genetic structure in a stream-dwelling caddisfly in eastern Canada 
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J. A. Addison, A. L. Einfeldt, N. N. Kang and S. J. Walde
pp. 459-468

We used mtDNA sequences to study the population genetic structure in the stream dwelling caddisfly Rhyacophila minor. We detected significant genetic subdivision across a spatial scale of only 45 km, and a phylogeographic break that corresponded with the characteristics of bedrock and surficial geology. This study demonstrates the roles that limited gene flow and genetic drift have in driving population differentiation at small spatial scales.

 
  
 

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From perennial to temporary streams: an extreme drought as a driving force of freshwater communities 
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Carmen L. Elias, Ana Raquel Calapez, Salomé F. P. Almeida and Maria João Feio
pp. 469-480

Changes in trait proportions were used to assess the effects of an uncommon drought event in diatom and macroinvertebrate communities in Atlantic-temperate perennial streams. The trait proportions of these temperate communities were also compared with those from temporary Mediterranean streams. This study suggests that the effects of drying were long-lasting for macroinvertebrates. However, only the diatom shifted towards proportions occurring in Mediterranean streams.

 
  
 

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These articles have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication. They are still in production and have not been edited, so may differ from the final published form.

    MF14370  Accepted 20 April 2015
    Spatial genetic subdivision among populations of the highly-migratory species (Istiompax indica) within the central Indo-Pacific
    Samuel Williams, Mike Bennett, Julian Pepperell, Jessica Morgan, Jenny Ovenden
    Abstract


    MF14262  Accepted 17 April 2015
    Using sedimentary diatoms to identify reference conditions and historical variability in shallow lake ecosystems in the Yangtze floodplain
    Xuhui Dong, Xiangdong Yang, Xu Chen, Qian Liu, Min Yao, Rong Wang, Min Xu
    Abstract


    MF14246  Accepted 14 April 2015
    How does the management of rice in natural ponds alter aquatic insect community functional structure?
    Marina Dalzochio, Renata Baldin, Cristina Stenert, Leonardo Maltchik
    Abstract


    MF14423  Accepted 13 April 2015
    A new tool in the toolbox for large-scale, high-throughput fisheries mark-recapture studies using genetic identification.
    Russell Bradford, Peta Hill, Campbell Davies, Peter Grewe
    Abstract


    MF15012  Accepted 11 April 2015
    Primacy of bottom-up effects on a butterflyfish assemblage
    Susannah Leahy, Garry Russ, Rene Abesamis
    Abstract


    MF15003  Accepted 09 April 2015
    Geographic distribution of the short-tailed river stingray, Potamotrygon brachyura: assessing habitat loss and fishing as threats to the world's largest obligate freshwater elasmobranch
    Luis Lucifora, Santiago Barbini, Sabina Llamazares Vegh, Pablo Scarabotti, Facundo Vargas, Agustín Solari, Ezequiel Mabragaña, Juan Díaz de Astarloa
    Abstract


    MF14424  Accepted 08 April 2015
    Olfactory responses of coral reef fishes to coral degradation and crown-of-thorns (Acanthaster planci)
    Amy Coppock, Naomi Gardiner, Geoffrey Jones
    Abstract


    MF14360  Accepted 09 April 2015
    How sensitive are invertebrates to riparian-zone replanting in stream ecosystems?
    Darren Giling, Ralph Mac Nally, Ross Thompson
    Abstract


    MF15023  Accepted 07 April 2015
    DETERMINING OPTIMAL SAMPLING STRATEGIES FOR MONITORING THREATENED ENDEMIC MACRO-INVERTEBRATES IN AUSTRALIA’S DISCHARGE SPRINGS
    Renee Rossini, Rod Fensham, Gimme Walter
    Abstract


    MF14391  Accepted 04 April 2015
    The contribution of migratory mesopelagic fishes to neuston fish assemblages across the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans.
    Pilar Olivar, Juan Gonzalez-Gordillo, Jordi Salat, Guillem Chust, Andres Cózar, Maria Fernández de Puelles, Xabier Irigoyen
    Abstract


    MF14397  Accepted 31 March 2015
    Identification of human-made physical barriers to fish passage in the Wet Tropics region, Australia
    Frederieke Kroon, Seonaid Phillips
    Abstract


    MF14374  Accepted 30 March 2015
    A comparison of the physiological responses, behaviour and biotransformation of PSP toxins in a surf clam Paphies donacina and the green-lipped mussel Perna canaliculus
    Islay Marsden, Andrea Contreras, Lincoln MacKenzie, Murray Munro
    Abstract


    MF14357  Accepted 30 March 2015
    Influence of oceanic fronts on mesozooplankton abundance and grazing during spring in the Southwestern Atlantic
    Rubens Lopes, Catarina Marcolin, Frederico Brandini
    Abstract


    MF15004  Accepted 28 March 2015
    Trophic relationships of the platypus: insights from stable isotope and cheek pouch dietary analyses
    Melissa Klamt, Jennifer Davis, Ross Thompson, Richard Marchant, Tom Grant
    Abstract


    MF14248  Accepted 25 March 2015
    Morphologically similar, coexisting hard corals (Porites lobata and P. solida) display similar trophic isotopic ratios across reefs and depths
    Jeremiah Plass-Johnson, Christopher McQuaid, Jaclyn Hill
    Abstract


    MF14426  Accepted 25 March 2015
    Algal composition and biomass in the tropical soda lake Chitu with focus on seasonal variability of Arthrospira fusiformis (Cyanophyta)
    Tadesse Ogato, Demeke Kifle, Brook Lemma
    Abstract


    MF14319  Accepted 20 March 2015
    Using paleoenvironmental records to guide restoration, conservation and adaptive management of Ramsar freshwater wetlands: Lessons from the Everglades, USA
    Melanie Riedinger-Whitmore
    Abstract


    MF14264  Accepted 20 March 2015
    Reproductive biology of an endemic amphidromous goby, Cotylopus acutipinnis, from La Réunion Island
    Nils Teichert, Pierre Valade, Alexis Fostier, Henri Grondin, Philippe Gaudin
    Abstract


    MF14251  Accepted 20 March 2015
    Wandering wetlands: spatial patterns of historical channel and floodplain change in the Ramsar-listed Macquarie Marshes, Australia
    Timothy Ralph, Paul Hesse, Tsuyoshi Kobayashi
    Abstract


    MF14218  Accepted 18 March 2015
    SPATIO-TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF THE SURF ZONE FAUNA OF TWO ECUADORIAN SANDY BEACHES
    Jose Marin Jarrin, Sandra Miño Quezada, Luis Dominguez Granda, Sonnia Guartatanga Argudo, Maria Cornejo
    Abstract


    MF14330  Accepted 17 March 2015
    Population dynamics of a high latitude coral Alveopora japonica Eguchi from Jeju Island, off the south coast of Korea
    Christophe Vieira, Keshavmurthy Shashank, Se-Jong Ju, Kiseong Hyeong, Inah Seo, Chang-Keun Kang, Hyun-Ki Hong, Chaolun Allen Chen, Kwang-Sik Choi
    Abstract


    MF14294  Accepted 17 March 2015
    Typhoon effects on phytoplankton responses in a semi-closed freshwater ecosystem
    Chia-Ying Ko, Chao-Chen Lai, Tzong-Yueh Chen, Huang-Hsiung Hsu, F.-K. Shiah
    Abstract


    MF14200  Accepted 09 March 2015
    The effects of growth anomaly on susceptibility of Montipora capitata to turf algal overgrowth
    Danielle Claar
    Abstract


    MF14059  Accepted 09 March 2015
    Distribution and spatial modelling of a soft coral habitat in the Port Stephens-Great Lakes Marine Park: implications for management
    Davina Poulos, Christopher Gallen, Thomas Davis, David Booth, David Harasti
    Abstract


    MF14325  Accepted 03 March 2015
    Phytoplankton dynamics in a subtropical tidal creek: influences of rainfall and water residence time on composition and biomass
    Susan Badylak, Edward Phlips, Nicole Dix, Jane Hart, Akeapot Srifa, Daniel Haunert, Zhenli He, Jean Lockwood, Peter Stofella, Detong Sun, Yuagen Yang
    Abstract


    MF14340  Accepted 02 March 2015
    Comparison of in situ and satellite sea surface temperature data from South Australia and Tasmania: How reliable are satellite data as a proxy for coastal temperatures in temperate southern Australia?
    Ben Stobart, Stephen Mayfield, Craig Mundy, Alistair Hobday, Jason Hartog
    Abstract


    MF14254  Accepted 26 February 2015
    A data-driven method for selecting candidate reference sites for stream bioassessment programs using generalised dissimilarity models
    Peter Rose, Mark Kennard, Fran Sheldon, David Moffatt, Gavin Butler
    Abstract


    MF14151  Accepted 27 February 2015
    Assessing threats from coral and CCA disease on the reefs of New Caledonia
    Greta Aeby, Aline Tribollet, Gregory Lasne, Thierry Work
    Abstract


    MF14228  Accepted 25 February 2015
    Aspects of the reproductive biology of dusky, spinner and sandbar sharks (Family Carcharhinidae) from the Tasman Sea
    Pascal Geraghty, William Macbeth, Jane Williamson
    Abstract


    MF14117  Accepted 23 February 2015
    Muddy Waters: The influence of high suspended sediment concentration on the diving behaviour of a bimodally respiring freshwater turtle from north-eastern Australia.
    Jason Schaffer, Mark Hamann, Richard Rowe, Damien Burrows
    Abstract


    MF14358  Accepted 20 February 2015
    Human impacts on connectivity in marine and freshwater ecosystems assessed using graph theory: a review
    Megan Saunders, Christopher Brown, Melissa Foley, Catherine Febria, Rebecca Albright, Molly Mehling, Maria Kavanaugh, Dana Burfeind
    Abstract


    MF14256  Accepted 19 February 2015
    Relative importance of physical and biological factors regulating tintinnid populations: a field study with frequent samplings in Sendai Bay, Japan
    Takehiro Kazama, Jotaro Urabe
    Abstract


    MF14266  Accepted 19 December 2014
    A test of metabolic and consumptive responses to local and global perturbations: enhanced resources stimulate herbivores to counter expansion of weedy species
    Chloe McSkimming, Bayden Russell, Jason Tanner, Sean Connell
    Abstract


    MF14116  Accepted 15 February 2015
    Age and growth dynamics of spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias, in the Adriatic Sea (Eastern Mediterranean Sea)
    Romana Gračan, Scott Heppell, Gordana Lacković, Bojan Lazar
    Abstract


    MF14230  Accepted 14 February 2015
    Can tributary in-flows improve DOC regime recovery in a snowmelt river regulated by a large reservoir?
    Ann-Marie Rohlfs, Simon Mitrovic, Simon Williams, Daniel Coleman
    Abstract


    MF14363  Accepted 12 February 2015
    Zinc and Nickel Binary Mixtures Act Additively on the Tropical Mysid Mysidopsis juniae
    Livia Figueiredo, Jeamylle Nillin, Allyson Silva, Evila Damasceno, Susana Loureiro, Leticia Lotufo
    Abstract


    MF14356  Accepted 12 February 2015
    First data on the age, growth and sexual maturity of the piked spurdog, Squalus megalops (Chondrichthyes: Squalidae), in the Gulf of Gabès (Central Mediterranean Sea)
    Sondes Marouani, Hasna Kadri, MOHAMED BRADAI
    Abstract


    MF14353  Accepted 12 February 2015
    The effect of elevated CO2 on autotrophic picoplankton abundance and production in a eutrophic lake (Lake Taihu, China)
    Shengnan Li, Jian Zhou, Lijun Wei, Fanxiang Kong, Xiaoli Shi
    Abstract


    MF14345  Accepted 10 February 2015
    Genetic analyses reveal declining trends and low effective population size in an overfished South African sciaenid species, the dusky kob (Argyrosomus japonicus)
    Luca Mirimin, Brett Macey, Sven Kerwath, Stephen Lamberth, Aletta Bester-van der Merwe, Paul Cowley, Paulette Bloomer, Rouvay Roodt-Wilding
    Abstract


    MF14307  Accepted 10 February 2015
    A Ramsar-wetland in suburbia: Wetland management in an urbanised, industrialised area.
    Stephanie Kermode, Henk Heijnis, Henri Wong, Atun Zawadzki, Patricia Gadd, Aditya Permana
    Abstract


    MF14216  Accepted 09 February 2015
    The hypoxia that developed in a microtidal estuary following an extreme storm produced dramatic changes in the benthos
    James Tweedley, Christopher Hallett, Richard Warwick, K Clarke, Ian Potter
    Abstract


    MF14193  Accepted 10 February 2015
    High-resolution, multi-proxy palaeoenvironmental changes recorded from Two Mile Lake, southern Western Australia: Implications for Ramsar-listed playa sites
    Chris Gouramanis, Patrick de deckker, Daniel Wilkins, John Dodson
    Abstract


    MF14210  Accepted 09 February 2015
    Diversity partitioning of a phytoplankton community in tropical semi-arid salterns
    Raiane Costa, Joseline Molozzi, Luiz Hepp, Renato Rocha, José Barbosa
    Abstract


    MF14342  Accepted 08 February 2015
    Estimating the dynamics of spawning aggregations using biological and fisheries data
    Andre Punt, David Smith, Malcolm Haddon, Sarah Russell, Geoff Tuck, Tim Ryan
    Abstract


    MF14109  Accepted 05 February 2015
    Comparative assessment of aquatic macroinvertebrate diversity in irrigated rice fields and wetlands through different spatial scales: an additive partitioning approach
    Mateus Pires, Carla Kotzian, Marcia Spies, Vanessa Baptista
    Abstract


    MF14331  Accepted 03 February 2015
    DNA barcoding Australian macroinvertebrates for monitoring programs: benefits and current short comings
    Michael Shackleton, Gavin Rees
    Abstract


    MF14326  Accepted 02 February 2015
    Triggering larval settlement behavior and metamorphosis of the burrowing ghost shrimp Lepidophthalmus siriboia (Callianassidae): Do cues matter?
    Kácia Campos, Fernando Abrunhosa, Darlan Simith
    Abstract


    MF14219  Accepted 03 February 2015
    VARIABILITY OF THE CARBONATE CHEMISTRY IN A SHALLOW, SEAGRASS-DOMINATED ECOSYSTEM: IMPLICATIONS FOR OCEAN ACIDIFICATION EXPERIMENTS
    Roberta Challener, Lisa Robbins, James McClintock
    Abstract


    MF14277  Accepted 31 January 2015
    Improving our ability to collect eggs of the threatened Australian grayling, Prototroctes maraena
    Frank Amtstaetter, David Dawson, Justin O'Connor
    Abstract


    MF14318  Accepted 26 January 2015
    Spatial and temporal variation of kelp forests and associated macroalgal assemblages along the Portuguese coast
    Daniela Pinho, Iacopo Bertocci, Francisco Arenas, João Franco, David Jacinto, João Castro, Raquel Vieira, Isabel Pinto, Thomas Wernberg, Fernando Tuya
    Abstract


    MF14247  Accepted 27 January 2015
    Relationship between otolith chemistry and age in a widespread pelagic teleost Arripis trutta: influence of adult movements on stock structure and implications for management.
    Julian Hughes, John Stewart, Bronwyn Gillanders, Damian Collins, Iain Suthers
    Abstract


    MF14308  Accepted 22 January 2015
    Substrate type affects the abundance and size of a coral reef sponge between depths
    Alan Duckworth
    Abstract


    MF14189  Accepted 16 January 2015
    Historical water plant occurrence and environmental change in two contrasting catchments
    Michelle Casanova
    Abstract


    MF14245  Accepted 16 January 2015
    Electrosensory-driven feeding behaviours of the Port Jackson shark (Heterodontus portusjacksoni) and Western shovelnose ray (Aptychotrema vincentiana)
    Ryan Kempster, Channing Egeberg, Nathan Hart, Shaun Collin
    Abstract


    MF14232  Accepted 12 January 2015
    Shifts in shell mineralogy and metabolism of Concholepas concholepas juveniles along the Chilean coast
    Laura Ramajo, Alejandro Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos Duarte, Marco Lardies, Nelson Lagos
    Abstract


    MF14007  Accepted 13 January 2015
    Bottlenose dolphin communities from the southern Brazilian coast: Do they exchange genes or are they just neighbors?
    Ana Paula Borges Costa, Pedro Fruet, Fabio Daura-Jorge, Paulo César Simões-Lopes, Paulo Henrique Ott, Victor Hugo Valiati, Larissa Oliveira
    Abstract


    MF14316  Accepted 08 January 2015
    Growth and spatiotemporal distribution of juvenile shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, in the western and central North Pacific
    Mikihiko Kai, Ko Shiozaki, Seiji Ohshimo, Kotaro Yokawa
    Abstract


    MF14311  Accepted 06 January 2015
    Diversity and abundance of epibiota on invasive and native estuarine gastropods depend on substratum and salinity
    Jakob Thyrring, Mads Thomsen, Ane Kirstine Brunbjerg, Thomas Wernberg
    Abstract


    MF14335  Accepted 24 December 2014
    Distribution and trophic dynamics of riparian tetragnathid spiders in a large river system
    Paradzayi Tagwireyi, Mazeika Sullivan
    Abstract


    MF14301  Accepted 22 December 2014
    The productivity of the macroinvertebrate prey of the platypus in the upper Shoalhaven River, New South Wales
    Richard Marchant, Tom Grant
    Abstract


    MF14215  Accepted 22 December 2014
    Ciguatera toxins in wild coral reef fish along the southern coast of China
    Ni Wu, Qingliu Huan, Kemei Du, Rong Hu, Tianjiu Jiang
    Abstract


    MF14121  Accepted 22 December 2014
    Condition of larvae of western rock lobster (Panulirus cygnus) in cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies of the Leeuwin Current off Western Australia
    Miao Wang, Richard O’Rorke, Anya Waite, Lynnath Beckley, Peter Thompson, Andrew Jeffs
    Abstract


    MF14038  Accepted 22 December 2014
    UV radiation effects on the embryos of anchoveta Engraulis ringens and common sardine Strangomera bentincki off Central Chile.
    Paulina Vásquez Rojas, Alejandra Llanos-Rivera, Leonardo Castro, Camila Fernández
    Abstract


    MF14272  Accepted 21 December 2014
    High sediment temperatures influence the emergence of dormant aquatic biota
    Daryl Nielsen, Elke Jasper, Nathan Ning, Susan Lawler
    Abstract


    MF14344  Accepted 16 December 2014
    Phosphorus speciation, transformation and retention in the Three Gorge Reservoir, China
    Xiangbin Ran, Hongtao Chen, Junfeng Wei, Qingzhen Yao, Tiezhu Mi, Zhigang Yu
    Abstract


    MF14317  Accepted 13 December 2014
    First observations of dusky sharks (Carcharhinus obscurus) attacking a humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) calf
    Matt Dicken, Alison Kock, Morne Hardenberg
    Abstract


    MF14187  Accepted 11 December 2014
    Implications of Environmental Trajectories for Limits of Acceptable Change: a case study of the Riverland Ramsar Site, South Australia
    Peter Newall, Lance Lloyd, Peter Gell, Keith Walker
    Abstract


    MF14305  Accepted 08 December 2014
    Age determination and growth estimation from otolith micro-increments and fin spine sections of blue marlin, Makaira nigricans, in the western North Pacific
    Tamaki Shimose, Kotaro Yokawa, Katsunori Tachihara
    Abstract


    MF14163  Accepted 04 December 2014
    Facing the future: The importance of substratum features for ecological engineering of artificial habitats in the rocky intertidal
    Louise Firth, Freya White, Meredith Schofield, Michael Hanley, Michael Burrows, Richard Thompson, Martin Skov, Ally Evans, Pippa Moore, Steve Hawkins
    Abstract


    MF14295  Accepted 03 December 2014
    Controlling inputs from the land to sea: limit-setting, cumulative impacts and Ki Uta ki Tai
    David Schiel, Clive Howard-Williams
    Abstract


    MF14154  Accepted 19 November 2014
    How good are we at assessing the impact of ocean acidification in coastal systems? Limitations, omissions and strengths of commonly used experimental approaches with a special emphasis on the neglected role of fluctuations.
    Martin Wahl, Yvonne Sawall, Vincent Saderne
    Abstract


    MF14222  Accepted 31 October 2014
    The Gippsland Lakes: management challenges posed by long-term environmental change
    Paul Boon, Perran Cook, Ryan Woodland
    Abstract


    MF14211  Accepted 13 October 2014
    Transient effects of an invasive kelp on the community structure and primary productivity of an intertidal assemblage
    Paul South, Stacie Lilley, Leigh Tait, Tommaso Alestra, Mike Hickford, Mads Thomsen, David Schiel
    Abstract


    MF14155  Accepted 01 October 2014
    Climate-driven shifts in species’ distributions may exacerbate the impacts of storm disturbances on northeast Atlantic kelp forests
    Daniel Smale, Thomas Vance
    Abstract


    MF14229  Accepted 23 September 2014
    Cusps and butterflies: multiple stable states in marine systems as catastrophes
    Peter Petraitis, Steve Dudgeon
    Abstract


    MF14158  Accepted 16 August 2014
    The value of a broad temporal and spatial perspective in understanding dynamics of kelp forest ecosystems
    Daniel Reed, Andrew Rassweiler, Robert Miller, Henry Page, Sally Holbrook
    Abstract


    MF14152  Accepted 14 August 2014
    A host-specific habitat former controls biodiversity across ecological transitions in a rocky intertidal facilitation cascade
    Mads Thomsen, Isis Metcalfe, Paul South, David Schiel
    Abstract


77


The Most Read ranking is based on the number of downloads from the CSIRO PUBLISHING website of articles published in the previous 12 months. Usage statistics are updated daily.

Rank Paper Details
1. Published 25 September 2014
How much wetland has the world lost? Long-term and recent trends in global wetland area

Nick C. Davidson

2. Published 28 July 2014
Maximum age and missing time in the vertebrae of sand tiger shark (Carcharias taurus): validated lifespan from bomb radiocarbon dating in the western North Atlantic and southwestern Indian Oceans

M. S. Passerotti, A. H. Andrews, J. K. Carlson, S. P. Wintner, K. J. Goldman and L. J. Natanson

3. Published 25 September 2014
A snapshot of the limnology of eastern Australian water bodies spanning the tropics to Tasmania: the land-use, climate, limnology nexus

Jie Christine Chang, Craig Woodward and James Shulmeister

4. Published 26 August 2014
Combining in-trawl video with observer coverage improves understanding of protected and vulnerable species by-catch in trawl fisheries

Vanessa F. Jaiteh, Simon J. Allen, Jessica J. Meeuwig and Neil R. Loneragan

5. Published 26 August 2014
Ecological effects of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) in a semi-arid floodplain wetland

Lorenzo Vilizzi, Leigh A. Thwaites, Benjamin B. Smith, Jason M. Nicol and Chris P. Madden

6. Published 24 October 2014
Habitat and space use of an abundant nearshore shark, Rhizoprionodon taylori

S. E. M. Munroe, C. A. Simpfendorfer and M. R. Heupel

7. Published 25 September 2014
Historical changes in mean trophic level of southern Australian fisheries

Heidi K. Alleway, Sean D. Connell, Tim M. Ward and Bronwyn M. Gillanders

8. Published 27 April 2015
Age and growth of the white shark, Carcharodon carcharias, in the western North Atlantic Ocean

Lisa J. Natanson and Gregory B. Skomal

9. Published 28 July 2014
Facilitating upstream passage of small-bodied fishes: linking the thermal dependence of swimming ability to culvert design

Essie M. Rodgers, Rebecca L. Cramp, Matthew Gordos, Anna Weier, Sarah Fairfall, Marcus Riches and Craig E. Franklin

10. Published 26 February 2015
Collaborative approaches to accessing and utilising historical citizen science data: a case-study with spearfishers from eastern Australia

Daniel C. Gledhill, Alistair J. Hobday, David J. Welch, Stephen G. Sutton, Matthew J. Lansdell, Mathew Koopman, Adrian Jeloudev, Adam Smith and Peter R. Last

11. Published 24 June 2014
Recognising wetland ecosystem services within urban case studies

Robert J. McInnes

12. Published 24 October 2014
Does coastal topography constrain marine biogeography at an oceanographic interface?

Jonathan M. Waters, Scott A. Condie and Luciano B. Beheregaray

13. Published 7 November 2014
Population structure and biology of shortfin mako, Isurus oxyrinchus, in the south-west Indian Ocean

J. C. Groeneveld, G. Cliff, S. F. J. Dudley, A. J. Foulis, J. Santos and S. P. Wintner

14. Published 30 May 2014
Persistence of central Australian aquatic invertebrate communities

J. Brim-Box, J. Davis, K. Strehlow, G. McBurnie, A. Duguid, C. Brock, K. McConnell, C. Day and C. Palmer

15. Published 27 January 2015
Quantifying uncertainty in environmental indices: an application to an estuarine health index

Melissa J. Dobbie and David Clifford

16. Published 30 May 2014
Photosynthetic responses to submergence in mangrove seedlings

Mwita M. Mangora, Matern S. P. Mtolera and Mats Björk

17. Published 28 July 2014
Environmental flow management using transparency and translucency rules

Ivor Growns and Ivars Reinfelds

18. Published 30 May 2014
Optimising an integrated pest-management strategy for a spatially structured population of common carp (Cyprinus carpio) using meta-population modelling

Paul Brown and Dean Gilligan

19. Published 7 November 2014
Age and growth of the whale shark (Rhincodon typus) in the north-western Pacific

Hua Hsun Hsu, Shoou Jeng Joung, Robert E. Hueter and Kwang Ming Liu

20. Published 30 April 2014
Customary and recreational fishing pressure: large-bodied fish assemblages in a tropical, intermittent Australian river

Paul G. Close, Rebecca J. Dobbs, David J. Tunbridge, Peter C. Speldewinde, Danielle M. Warfe, Sandy Toussaint and Peter M. Davies


      
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