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Marine & Freshwater Research is a multidisciplinary journal publishing original research and reviews on all aquatic environments and subject areas. More

Editor-in-Chief: Max Finlayson

 

 
 
 

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Published online 29 April 2016
Otolith chemistry as an indicator of movements of albacore (Thunnus alalunga) in the North Atlantic Ocean 
Igaratza Fraile, Haritz Arrizabalaga, Josu Santiago, Nicolas Goñi, Igor Arregi, Sonia Madinabeitia, R. J. David Wells and Jay R. Rooker

In this paper we measured stable isotopes (δ13C and δ18O) and trace elements (Mg, Mn, Sr, Ba) in otoliths of North Atlantic albacore (Thunnus alalunga) collected from the Bay of Biscay and Atlantic offshore waters to explore the potential existence of population structuring and migratory patterns of albacore in the eastern North Atlantic Ocean.

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Published online 29 April 2016
Palaeoecology to inform wetland conservation and management: some experiences and prospects 
Stewart J. Clarke and A. Jasmyn J. Lynch

We describe the role and value of palaeoecology to wetland management. We present examples of palaeoecology being used to support site-based conservation decisions for wetlands in the UK and discuss how knowledge of past ecological conditions can help with: landscape-scale conservation, a focus on ecosystem services and natural capital, and an interdisciplinary approach to managing social–ecological systems.

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Published online 29 April 2016
Distribution of fish larvae within a weakly tidal mangrove lagoon 
J. Jaxion-Harm and M. R. Speight

We surveyed fish larvae in a semi-isolated mangrove lagoon and tested three different catch methods: minnow traps, light traps, and plankton tow nets. Overall, parrotfish and snapper were the most common larvae from coral-reef fish families, and anchovies were the most common lagoon habitat specialists. Although light traps were the most successful method, they were not as effective in turbid water.

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Published online 28 April 2016
Validation of age determination using otoliths of the European anchovy (Engraulis encrasicolus L.) in the Bay of Biscay 
A. Uriarte, I. Rico, B. Villamor, E. Duhamel, C. Dueñas, N. Aldanondo and U. Cotano

Validation of the age determination using otoliths of European anchovy is presented along with a historical corroboration of the method and a summary of the annual growth in length. The paper also describes the three key pieces of information required, given a date of capture, for age determination: the typical annual growth pattern of otoliths, their seasonal edge formation by ages and the most typical checks.

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   | Supplementary Material (470 KB)  |        Open Access Article
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Published online 27 April 2016
Another New Zealand centenarian: age validation of black cardinalfish (Epigonus telescopus) using lead–radium and bomb radiocarbon dating 
Dianne M. Tracey, Allen H. Andrews, Peter L. Horn and Helen L. Neil

Current inadequacies in quality control throughout environmental DNA (eDNA) surveys create the potential for method error to produce false negative detections. We show how a secondary, generic primer, designed to co-amplify endogenous DNA sampled during species-specific eDNA surveys, can be used to monitor method success throughout all stages of eDNA analysis. This positive control enables the distinction of method error from informative non-amplification results, improving reliability in eDNA surveys.

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Published online 27 April 2016
Improving reliability in environmental DNA detection surveys through enhanced quality control 
Elise M. Furlan and Dianne Gleeson

Current inadequacies in quality control throughout environmental DNA (eDNA) surveys create the potential for method error to produce false negative detections. We show how a secondary, generic primer, designed to co-amplify endogenous DNA sampled during species-specific eDNA surveys, can be used to monitor method success throughout all stages of eDNA analysis. This positive control enables the distinction of method error from informative non-amplification results, improving reliability in eDNA surveys.

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Published online 20 April 2016
Daily growth patterns of juveniles and adults of the Peruvian anchovy (Engraulis ringens) in northern Chile 
Francisco Cerna and Guido Plaza

The daily growth patterns of juvenile and adult Peruvian anchovies in northern Chile for the recruitment and fishery seasons of 2009 and 2010 show high growth for the entire life history, maximising growth in the first year of life to reach a mean length at the first year of 16.3-cm total length.

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Published online 14 April 2016
Following fish feeding associations in marine and freshwater habitats 
José Sabino, Luciana P. Andrade, Ivan Sazima, Fabrício B. Teresa, Sergio R. Floeter, Cristina Sazima and Roberta M. Bonaldo

Following associations are composed of nuclear species that disturb the substratum when foraging, and followers that capitalise on food resources. We compared following associations between a marine reef and a freshwater stream. Associations in the freshwater resembled three iconic reef interactions. These similarities between the systems outnumbered the differences, probably because of the shared water environment and the simple requirements for this association.

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Published online 12 April 2016
Genetic relationships between landlocked and coastal populations of Lycengraulis grossidens (Engraulidae) in south-eastern South America: evidence for a continental colonisation route with secondary transitions to the coastal region 
Ana C. G. Mai, Lizandra J. Robe, Luis F. Marins and João P. Vieira

Lycengraulis grossidens originated from freshwater lineages and is currently distributed in estuaries and coastal zones. Nevertheless, based on otolith chemistry, there are landlocked individuals in the Uruguay River. The present study investigated the spatiotemporal scenario by which these landlocked individuals reached their current distribution: whether through a north-to-south continental route based on the connection between basins or from the marine environment and showed a phylogenetic history and biogeography consistent with a north-to-south continental colonisation route.

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Published online 12 April 2016
Restoring dissolved organic carbon subsidies from floodplains to lowland river food webs: a role for environmental flows? 
Darren S. Baldwin, Matthew J. Colloff, Simon M. Mitrovic, Nick R. Bond and Ben Wolfenden

We suggest that historically, dissolved carbon washed from lowland river floodplains during floods was an important energy source for lowland rivers. River regulation, floodplain isolation, and changes in land use have reduced the amount of carbon available to support riverine food webs. We argue that environmental flows could be used to help restore floodplain carbon subsidies back to the river channel.

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Published online 08 April 2016
Increased spreading potential of the invasive Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) at its northern distribution limit in Europe due to warmer climate 
Eli Rinde, Torulv Tjomsland, Dag Ø. Hjermann, Magdalena Kempa, Pia Norling and Venkat S. Kolluru

The Pacific oyster is a widely spread invasive species globally, with a great influence on native biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. How future climate will influence further spread and establishment of the species in the outer range of its present distribution is important knowledge to assess future risks and to plan mitigation actions. The present paper explores how future climate will affect the species spreading potential at its northern distribution limit in a temperate ecoregion, by three-dimensional oceanographic simulations using different climate scenarios.

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Published online 06 April 2016
Low functional redundancy and high variability in Sargassum browsing fish populations in a subtropical reef system 
Ben L. Gilby, Ian R. Tibbetts and Tim Stevens

Some fish species that are protected from fishing in no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) are important in improving the health of the coral reef itself. We show that it is important to determine how the abundance of these species changes over time and at different places so that we might be able to better place MPAs and better predict how the MPAs might function.

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Published online 04 April 2016
Response of fish assemblage structure to changing flood and flow pulses in a large subtropical river 
L. A. Espínola, A. P Rabuffetti, E Abrial, M. L. Amsler, M. C. A. Blettler, A. R. Paira, N. R. Simões and L. N. Santos

Fish assemblages of the Middle Paraná River floodplain were studied in the light of water variation. Several increases in water level and three flood pulses occurred during the period of study. Fish assemblage similarity was low between habitats during flood and flow pulses. Apparently, flow pulses would also function like floods, namely as mechanisms of spatio-temporal structuring of fish assemblages.

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Published online 01 April 2016
Negative effects of stagnation and drought on benthic invertebrate communities in lowland streams 
Liliana García and Isabel Pardo

This study used a creative mesocosm-approach to explore the effects of water reduction on abiotic and biotic components of streams, primarily on the macroinvertebrate community. The study was performed in two lowland streams with contrasting nutrients and used a before–after–control–impact-paired design. The negative observed effects of stagnation and drought on water quality and benthic invertebrate communities reflect the great susceptibility of lowland streams to global changes.

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Published online 24 March 2016
Quantitative food webs and invertebrate assemblages of a large River: a spatiotemporal approach in floodplain shallow lakes 
Débora A. Carvalho, Verónica Williner, Federico Giri, Carina Vaccari and Pablo A. Collins

We tested the hypothesis that the hydrological regime of large rivers affects the structure of invertebrate communities and food webs, by investigating two lakes with different connectivity to the fluvial system and over three hydroperiods. The present study exemplifies a quantitative approach to floodplain food-web analysis, which can be a valuable tool for the analysis of spatiotemporal variation in trophic interactions.

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Published online 24 March 2016
Biology of angel sharks (Squatina sp.) and sawsharks (Pristiophorus sp.) caught in south-eastern Australian trawl fisheries and the New South Wales shark-meshing (bather-protection) program 
V. Raoult, V. Peddemors and J. E. Williamson

The biology of angel sharks (Squatina sp.) and sawharks (Pristiophorus sp.) was assessed using animals captured in south-eastern Australia. Data indicated that there are morphological features that allow the separation of concurrent species, and we provide ratios that allow accurate predictions of total lengths from truncated specimens.

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Published online 24 March 2016
Spatial and temporal changes of three prey-fish assemblage structure in a hypersaline lagoon: the Coorong, South Australia 
M. A. Hossain, Q. Ye, S. C. Leterme and J. G. Qin

The present study investigated spatiotemporal variation of key prey fishes in the Murray Estuary and Coorong. Small-mouth hardyhead dominates the South Lagoon, and sandy sprat and Tamar goby occur in the North Lagoon at a low abundance, but both are absent from the South Lagoon. The change of prey-fish abundance is mainly driven by salinity. The study has improved our understanding on the dynamics of small-bodied fish species and key environmental factors regulating fish distribution.

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Published online 24 March 2016
Genetic structure and unique origin of the introduced blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis in the north-western Pacific: clues from mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) sequences 
Zhiqiang Han, Yangli Mao, Bonian Shui, Takashi Yanagimoto and Tianxiang Gao

In the present study we assessed the origin of introduced populations of Mytilus galloprovincialis in the north-western Pacific, providing new insight into the biogeography of M. galloprovincialis. The results showed that populations of M. galloprovincialis in the north-western Pacific were introduced from the middle Mediterranean Sea and that the Dalian population was the first colonised population in Chinese coastal waters.

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Published online 21 March 2016
Modelling the distribution and density of the invasive seaweed Sargassum muticum (Fucales, Sargassaceae) in shallow subtidal areas 
Giulia Cambiè, Diana Fernández-Márquez and Ramón Muiño

Introduced algae have the potential to substantially modify native communities. The present study describes the distribution and density of Sargassum muticum in shallow subtidal areas in Galicia (north-western Spain) and shows what factors might be behind its establishment. The study also demonstrates the usefulness of zero-inflated models to assess early and mid-stages of a seaweed invasion.

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Published online 21 March 2016
Exploring non-stationary and scale-dependent relationships between walleye (Sander vitreus) distribution and habitat variables in Lake Erie 
Changdong Liu, Rong Wan, Yan Jiao and Kevin B. Reid

The present study used the global and local regression models to explore the relationships between walleye abundance (Stizostedion vitreum) distribution and habitat variables in Lake Erie. The relationship was found to vary spatially and was scale-dependent. Our study highlights the importance of considering local regression. It also provides extra knowledge on zonation of species-habitat relationships and validates walleye management units to a degree.

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Published online 21 March 2016
Spatial and temporal variability of zooplankton–phytoplankton interactions in a large subtropical shallow lake dominated by non-toxic cyanobacteria 
Luana Morais da Rosa, Luciana de Souza Cardoso, Luciane Oliveira Crossetti and David da Motta-Marques

The size-specific and composition relationships between zooplankton and phytoplankton were evaluated in a large subtropical lake. The zooplankton to phytoplankton biomass ratio was usually very low, indicating a weak top-down control; however, the strength of this interaction varied with zooplankton composition and temporal or spatial variability of the environmental factors. The environmental variability induced by wind action and diversification of niches played a substantial role in the capacity of zooplankton in controlling the phytoplankton biomass.

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Published online 21 March 2016
Direct and indirect effects of near-future pCO2 levels on zooplankton dynamics 
Cédric L. Meunier, María Algueró-Muñiz, Henriette G. Horn, Julia A. F. Lange and Maarten Boersma

To disentangle the direct and indirect effects of ocean acidification on zooplankton growth, we undertook a study with two model organisms, Oxyrrhis marina and Acartia tonsa. Direct pH effects on consumers seem to be of lesser importance than the associated decrease in algal quality. The decrease in the quality of primary producers under high pCO2 conditions negatively affected zooplankton growth.

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Published online 21 March 2016
Strong genetic differentiation among populations of the freshwater shrimp Caridina cantonensis in Hong Kong: implications for conservation of freshwater fauna in urban areas 
Ling Ming Tsang, Kwok Ho Tsoi, Simon Kin-Fung Chan, Tony King-Tung Chan and Ka Hou Chu

Analysis of COI sequences of the shrimp Caridina cantonensis from streams in Hong Kong showed that populations from different streams are genetically distinct, whereas the genetic diversity within each stream is very low. The results suggested that a substantial amount of biodiversity might have been lost during the development of the city over the past century.

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Published online 18 March 2016
Growth and formation of annual zones in whole otoliths of Greenland halibut, a slow-growing deep-water fish 
O. T. Albert

To evaluate the method for age determination of Greenland halibut, a deep-water flatfish, juvenile fish were injected with a chemical compound that produces a time stamp in the otoliths. After up to 6 years at large, age readers identified the number of annual zones with a mean bias of 6 months or less, thus indicating that the current age reading protocol produces near-accurate age estimates.

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Published online 18 March 2016
Genetic analyses reveal limited dispersal and recovery potential in the large freshwater crayfish Euastacus armatus from the southern Murray–Darling Basin 
Nick S. Whiterod, Sylvia Zukowski, Martin Asmus, Dean Gilligan and Adam D. Miller

This paper investigated population genetic structure of Euastacus armatus across its present range to provide insight into recovery potential in the species. We revealed low levels of gene flow sufficient to maintain population sizes and genetic diversity, but also local genetic structuring and limitations on dispersal were evident. These findings forecast limited potential for natural recolonisation and recovery following the decline of local populations.

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Published online 18 March 2016
Taking advantage of adaptations when managing threatened species within variable environments: the case of the dwarf galaxias, Galaxiella pusilla (Teleostei, Galaxiidae) 
R. A. Coleman, T. A. Raadik, V. Pettigrove and A. A. Hoffmann

Management of invasive species largely focuses on early detection and eradication; however, once established, invaders could also be controlled by exploiting local adaptations in native species. The present research demonstrated that dwarf galaxias (Galaxiella pusilla), a threatened Australian freshwater fish, has adaptations to habitat drying that could underpin efforts to control invasive eastern gambusia (Gambusia holbrooki) within critical habitats.

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Published online 18 March 2016
Otoliths as individual indicators: a reappraisal of the link between fish physiology and otolith characteristics 
Peter Grønkjær

Otoliths are remarkable recorders that continuously store visual and chemical information about fish phenotype, life history and environment. This review highlights the coupling between fish physiology and otolith characteristics with a focus on questions that are fundamental, unanswered and with the potential to yield significant new insights into the variability in life history traits among individuals and the importance of this variability in a fluctuating and changing environment.

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Published online 11 March 2016
A technique for detection of larval fish in the digestive tract of predators by otolith marking 
M. I. Gómez and C. M. Fuentes

The present study proposes otolith marking as a method to unequivocally detect selected pre-flexion fish larvae in the digestive tracts of their fish predators, even several hours after their ingestion. Mark detection levels were high (>65%) even after 9 h from prey ingestion. This constitutes a single and inexpensive technique that could be applied in both laboratory and field experimental studies of predator–prey interactions.

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Published online 09 March 2016
Provision of environmental flows promotes spawning of a nationally threatened diadromous fish 
W. M. Koster, F. Amtstaetter, D. R. Dawson, P. Reich and J. R. Morrongiello

In this study, we investigated spawning responses of Australian grayling to environmental flows over 2 years in three coastal rivers. Spawning activity was highest during within-channel flow pulses, especially during periods of targeted managed flows. Peak spawning occurred in late autumn and was positively related to flow duration. Our study demonstrates the importance of quantifying flow-ecology relationships by targeted monitoring and research in order to develop appropriate flow regimes.

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Published online 09 March 2016
Mobilising fine sediment in a highly regulated upland snowmelt river using hydrological scaled experimental floods 
Daniel Coleman and Simon Williams

Regulated rivers lack large discharge events or floods, which play a critical role in controlling fine sediment deposition and the maintenance of healthy in-channel condition. Five large environmental floods were released into the regulated Snowy River to mitigate fine sediment accumulation within the river channel. This article identifies the effectiveness of multiple intra-annual floods of various magnitudes at mobilising fine sediment within the regulated river channel.

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Published online 07 March 2016
Regional shifts in phytoplankton succession and primary productivity in the San Antonio Bay System (USA) in response to diminished freshwater inflows 
Daniel L. Roelke, Hsiu-Ping Li, Carrie J. Miller-DeBoer, George M. Gable and Stephen E. Davis

In many coastal areas around the world freshwater inflows are threatened. The San Antonio Bay System (USA) is of particular interest because it is the winter home of the endangered whooping crane. Organisms of higher trophic levels might be deleteriously affected by reduced inflows because our study suggests that shifts in phytoplankton composition and location of productivity maxima will likely result from lower inflows.

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Published online 03 March 2016
The composition and health of fishes in residual dry season habitats in southern Africa (Strauch et al. 2015) 
Brian Marshall, Albert Chakona, Denis Tweddle, Paul Skelton, Roger Bills and John Minshull

We provide a comment to highlight and correct some errors contained in a recently published paper on the community composition of fishes in dry-land rivers in north-western Zimbabwe. With its errors, inadequate sampling and data collection, and the superficial and confusing data analysis, this paper cannot be said to have advanced our understanding of the fishes of Zimbabwe.

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Published online 01 March 2016
Testing otolith morphology for measuring marine fish biodiversity 
V. M. Tuset, M. Farré, J. L. Otero-Ferrer, A. Vilar, B. Morales-Nin and A. Lombarte

The shapes of sagittal otoliths of coastal fish assemblages of the north-west Mediterranean were described using geometric morphological analysis. Three morphological indices were estimated and compared with ecological, taxonomic, functional and morphological (from body fish shape) indices. The results revealed that otolith shape is a good variable for explaining the ecological structure of a fish assemblage and a useful tool for studying the diversity of fish assemblages.

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Published online 01 March 2016
Mangrove fish of São Tomé Island (Gulf of Guinea): new occurrences and habitat usage 
P. M. Félix, P. Chainho, R. F. Lima, J. L. Costa, A. J. Almeida, I. Domingos and A. C. Brito

Human disturbance of the sea–mangrove connection is currently hampering the natural hydrodynamics of both mangroves evaluated in this study (i.e. Conchas and Malanza). This, and the presence of the Mozambique tilapia, as elements of ecological disruption, may act as limiting factors for the potential biodiversity of the systems.

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Published online 01 March 2016
Using environmental (e)DNA sequencing for aquatic biodiversity surveys: a beginner’s guide 
Jennifer L. A. Shaw, Laura Weyrich and Alan Cooper

Environmental (e)DNA sequencing can be used to identify entire biological communities in a rapid and inexpensive way, and has the potential to benefit aquatic biodiversity surveys. The aim of this review is to provide guidance to non-geneticists regarding eDNA sequencing for biological surveys and to outline the requirements that need to be considered before the technique can be incorporated into aquatic biomonitoring programs.

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Published online 01 March 2016
Densities and biomass of larval sea lamprey populations (Petromyzon marinus Linnaeus, 1758) in north-western Spain and data comparisons with other European regions 
Sergio Silva, Rufino Vieira-Lanero, Sandra Barca and Fernando Cobo

Status and trends of larval populations of Petromyzon marinus were studied in north-western Spain by annual electrofishing surveys (2007–2011) and data from other European regions were compiled. The largest populations and the main fisheries of this threatened species are located in south-western Europe. Signs of population increases were registered; however, more data are needed to confirm a possible overall recovery.

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Published online 25 February 2016
Transport and transformation of dissolved organic matter in the Neuse River estuarine system, NC, USA, following Hurricane Irene (2011) 
Richard L. Miller, Matthew M. Brown and Ryan P. Mulligan

Changes in the quantity and quality of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in an estuarine system following a major rain event was examined using optical properties of DOM as a proxy for its chemical properties. A large pulse of terrestrial DOM entered the system that changed from higher to lower molecular weight DOM as it transited through the estuary, presumably caused by photodegradation.

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Published online 22 February 2016
Estimating the carbon biomass of marine net phytoplankton from abundance based on samples from China seas 
Yang Yang, Xiaoxia Sun, Mingliang Zhu, Xuan Luo and Shan Zheng

Significant regression relationships existed between carbon biomass and cell abundance for phytoplankton based on net samples from the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea. We established carbon biomass : cell abundance relationships for all phytoplankton cells, diatoms, dinoflagellates and each dominant genus. We suggest using these relationships to improve standing stock research in marine ecology.

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Published online 11 February 2016
Do vertebral chemical signatures distinguish juvenile blacktip shark (Carcharhinus limbatus) nursery regions in the northern Gulf of Mexico? 
Justin P. Lewis, William F. Patterson, John K. Carlson and Katherine McLachlin

The potential usefulness of vertebral chemistry to identify natal origin of blacktip sharks (Carcharhinus limbatus) in the northern Gulf of Mexico is demonstrated in this study. Regional differences in vertebral chemistry produced average classification accuracies of 81 and 85% for the 2012 and 2013 year-classes respectively. Important considerations are also discussed regarding the application of natural chemical tags to study connectivity of coastal elasmobranch populations.

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Published online 11 February 2016
Increases in humic and bioavailable dissolved organic matter in a forested New England headwater stream with increasing discharge 
Henry F. Wilson, Peter A. Raymond, James E. Saiers, William V. Sobczak and Na Xu

Movement of dissolved organic matter from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems represents a transfer of energy of fundamental importance to aquatic microbial food webs. In a headwater stream with homogenous forested land cover, the export of more humic dissolved organic matter increases during hydrologic events and biodegradation experiments indicate the potential for this material to act as a downstream energy source.

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Published online 11 February 2016
Population dynamics and secondary production of gastropods on a sheltered beach in south-eastern Brazil: a comparison between an herbivore and a scavenger 
Ricardo S. Cardoso and Tatiana M. B. Cabrini

Relationships between productivity and population biology (abundance, individual size, growth rates, longevity, secondary production and turnover rates) of two intertidal gastropods of different trophic levels, the herbivorous Cerithium atratum and the scavenger Nassarius vibex, in a sandflat environment were investigated. The life-history traits of the gastropod species responded to different trophic levels. Herbivores had higher abundance, growth and production efficiency than did scavengers.

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Published online 11 February 2016
American eel (Anguilla rostrata) substrate selection for daytime refuge and winter thermal sanctuary 
J. P. N. Tomie, D. K. Cairns, R. S. Hobbs, M. Desjardins, G. L. Fletcher and S. C. Courtenay

Summary.  American eels commonly occupy bays and estuaries of the southern Gulf of St Lawrence in both summer and winter. Winter use of this region is perplexing because seawater under winter ice is often cold enough to freeze and kill fish. We demonstrate that American eels lack antifreeze proteins, and instead, find thermal protection in mud burrows that are warmer than the overlying water.

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Published online 10 February 2016
Zooplankton generation following inundation of floodplain soils: effects of vegetation type and riverine connectivity 
Alicia K. Catlin, Kevin J. Collier and Ian C. Duggan

We investigated the potential for zooplankton to emerge following inundation of dry soils on the lower Waikato River floodplain, New Zealand. Our findings indicate that scrub and forested floodplains can be important areas for large-bodied zooplankton production, and that maintaining vegetative heterogeneity on floodplains may promote trophic subsidies for migrating juvenile fish as floodwaters subside.

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Published online 05 February 2016
Parameter-sparse modification of Fourier methods to analyse the shape of closed contours with application to otolith outlines 
Alf Harbitz

The shape of the closed contour of fish ear stones (otoliths) has proven to contain important information useful for fish stock management. To reveal shape differences between fish stocks, classical Fourier methods have been the most frequently used approach. A simple modification has been developed that needs considerably fewer Fourier descriptors to obtain a good, large-scale description of the contour.

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Published online 05 February 2016
Coral bleaching in turbid waters of north-western Australia 
A. Lafratta, J. Fromont, P. Speare and C. H. L. Schönberg

Using towed imagery in turbid waters enabled a rapid, large-scale survey that observed severe thermal coral bleaching in March 2013 off Onslow, north-western Australia. Despite predominance of bleaching resistant species we found over 50% of all corals bleached in 10–15-m water depth. Recurrent heat stress is assumed to have structured the local coral community, eliminating thermally vulnerable species.

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Published online 05 February 2016
Fish on the roof of the world: densities, habitats and trophic position of stone loaches (Triplophysa) in Tibetan streams 
Dean Jacobsen, Søren Kock Laursen, Ladislav Hamerlik, Karen Moltesen, Anders Michelsen and Kirsten Seestern Christoffersen

We surveyed Tibetan streams between 4459 and 5062 m above sea level to obtain data on densities, habitat preferences, feeding selectivity and food web position of the stone loach Triplophysa; some of the world’s highest living and ecologically least studied fish. Densities were highest near lakes (1.6 individuals m–2) and decreased with altitude and glacial influence. Triplophysa was omnivorous, but was always at the top of the food web.

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Published online 05 February 2016
Open water metabolism and dissolved organic carbon in response to environmental watering in a lowland river–floodplain complex 
Todd A. Wallace and Deborah Furst

The influence of environmental watering actions on dissolved organic carbon and open-water productivity within management areas and the adjacent river channel was assessed. The results contribute to our understanding of the role of terrestrial organic material in supporting aquatic food webs in lowland rivers, and demonstrate potential for environmental watering to have a positive influence on riverine productivity during periods of low water availability.

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Published online 27 January 2016
A bioeconomic analysis of conserving freshwater values in an agricultural landscape 
D. M. Warfe and J. G. Tisdell

We compared the effects of water allocations, conservation and climate change scenarios on economic returns from irrigation. Land use had the greatest economic returns, but land area suitable for irrigation rather than irrigation water itself was the major limitation. Annexing land for freshwater conservation values had only small effects on economic returns, suggesting that conservation and agricultural development are not necessarily antagonistic goals.

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Published online 13 January 2016
Review and conceptual models of agricultural impacts and water quality in waterways of the Great Barrier Reef catchment area 
Aaron M. Davis, Richard G. Pearson, Jon E. Brodie and Barry Butler

There has been minimal synthesis of the impacts of water-quality degradation from agriculture on freshwater ecosystems in northern Australia. The present study conceptualises the spatial and temporal processes driving water-quality pressures in Australia’s Great Barrier Reef catchment area, with associated ecological impacts. Hydrology mediates the timing and scale of pollutant delivery to freshwater ecosystems, and the risk periods and specific nature of water-quality impacts can differ markedly from those most affecting downstream marine environments.

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    | Supplementary Material (675 KB)
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Published online 12 January 2016
Avoid predation or take risks in basic activities? Predator–prey relationship in subtropical streams between decapods and caddisflies 
Cristina Cerezer, Cristiane Biasi, Gláucia Bolzan Cogo and Sandro Santos

The aim of the present study was to analyse the movement, feeding and case-building behaviours of Phylloicus in the presence of a likely decapod predator, Aegla longirostri. The study demonstrated that caddisfly is able to detect the presence of the predator and modify its activities. It increases its chances of survival by building its case of more resistant materials and by reducing its movement.

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Published online 12 January 2016
Distribution of rotifers and other meiofauna in the bryophytes and hyporheic zone of a karst hydrosystem – an example of a nested community 
Tvrtko Dražina, Maria Špoljar, Biserka Primc and Ivan Habdija

Freshwater sediments harbour minute but diverse microscopic fauna, dominated by rotifers and nematodes. In our research we try to define occurrence and vertical distribution of these organisms in a specific karst sediment – tufa. Deeper parts of sediments are mostly inhabited by surface fauna that is morphologically pre-adapted to life within sediment interstices and this seems to be general rule in freshwater ecosystems.

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Published online 12 January 2016
Contrasting and complex evolutionary histories within the terapontid grunter genus Hephaestus revealed by nuclear and mitochondrial genes 
Bradley J. Pusey, Andrew Bentley, Damien Burrows, Colton Perna, Aaron Davis and Jane Hughes

Contrasting evolutionary histories may be revealed by mitochondrial and nuclear information. Mitochondrial data suggested that the widespread sooty grunter (Hephaestus fuliginosus) comprised three separate species; however, nuclear information revealed it to be one species only. The phylogeny revealed by mitochondrial data was strongly influenced by historical hybridisation within Hephaestus. Both sources of genetic information indicated a need for a revision of Terapontidae.

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    | Supplementary Material (845 KB)
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Published online 08 January 2016
Wild populations of Sydney rock oysters differ in their proteomic responses to elevated carbon dioxide 
E. L. Thompson, L. Parker, V. Amaral, M. J. Bishop, W. A. O'Connor and D. A. Raftos

Much of the CO2 released into the atmosphere from burning fossil fuels is being absorbed by the oceans changing the pH and causing it to become more acidified. As a consequence, marine organisms are likely to exhibit many changes, with shelled organisms such as oysters being particularly susceptible. This research suggests that the local environments from which oysters originate may affect their capacity to respond to ocean acidification.

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    | Supplementary Material (263 KB)
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Published online 07 January 2016
Evaluating potential sources of variation in Chironomidae catch rates on sticky traps 
Joshua T. Smith, Jeffrey D. Muehlbauer and Theodore A. Kennedy

This study answers practical questions regarding sticky trap sampling artefacts. We evaluated whether catch rates and sex ratios of Chironomidae were affected by spraying traps with insecticide, placing traps at different heights above ground, and placing traps at different locations within a terrestrial habitat patch. Our results inform whether these variables warrant consideration in future sticky trap studies.

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Published online 05 January 2016
The coral communities of Yongle atoll: status, threats and conservation significance for coral reefs in South China Sea 
Meixia Zhao, Kefu Yu, Qi Shi, Hongqiang Yang, Bernhard Riegl, Qiaomin Zhang, Hongqiang Yan, Tianran Chen, Guohui Liu and Ziyun Lin

The South China Sea (SCS) is an area of extensive coral reef development, yet the understanding on the coral reefs of this region is still low. We analysed the coral communities of Yongle atoll, the biggest atoll in the Xisha Islands, central South China Sea. This baseline investigation highlighted the ecological value of these reefs. They should receive much more scientific and conservation attention.

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Published online 05 January 2016
Species composition and hybridisation of mussel species (Bivalvia: Mytilidae) in Australia 
Emi S. Ab Rahim, Thuy T. T. Nguyen, Brett Ingram, Cynthia Riginos, Kim J. Weston and Craig D. H. Sherman

The taxonomic status of mussels belonging to the genus Mytilus is explored for several Australian populations. The use of nuclear and mitochondrial genetic markers show that the majority (98.5%) of individuals are M. galloprovincialis. The analysis also revealed that southern and northern hemisphere haplotypes are present, suggesting the introduction of non-native M. galloprovincialis lineages into Australia.

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    | Supplementary Material (680 KB)
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Published online 05 January 2016
The potential of benthic iron and phosphorus fluxes to support the growth of a bloom forming toxic cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula, Moreton Bay, Australia 
Peter Hanington, Andrew Rose and Ron Johnstone

After significant benthic community change following a major flood event, sediment–water fluxes were measured to assess the potential of sediments to support the growth of Lyngbya majuscula. The results show that intermittent periods of oxygen depletion can trigger benthic releases of biologically significant amounts of iron that could support the initiation and growth of L. majuscula blooms.

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Published online 05 January 2016
Inherent variation in carbon and nitrogen isotopic assimilation in the freshwater macro-invertebrate Cherax destructor 
Debashish Mazumder, Li Wen, Mathew P. Johansen, Tsuyoshi Kobayashi and Neil Saintilan

A laboratory based feeding experiment was conducted to examine how well freshwater macro-invertebrate muscle tissues isotopic ratios reflect the variability of various diet types and diet combinations they are fed. The study provides experimental evidence of individual variability in dietary assimilation. The results help interpret the trophic ecology of individuals feeding on the same or similar diets in the food web.

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    | Supplementary Material (263 KB)
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Published online 17 December 2015
Age, growth and maturation of Sthenoteuthis oualaniensis in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean by statolith analysis 
Bi Lin Liu, Xin Jun Chen, Jian Hua Li and Yong Chen

This paper provides basic information on the age, growth and maturation of S. oualaniensis in the equatorial waters of the ETPO, by using statolith microstructure analysis. The study improves our knowledge of the key life-history and population parameters for S. oualaniensis in the less studied ETPO waters and helps in the assessment and management of this important species.

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Published online 15 December 2015
Changes in discharge affect more surface than subsurface breakdown of organic matter in a mountain stream 
Libe Solagaistua, Maite Arroita, Ibon Aristi, Aitor Larrañaga and Arturo Elosegi

Freshwater ecosystems are particularly vulnerable to the increasingly more frequent discharge fluctuations worldwide. Water depth and velocity modifications in streams affect the biota and the processes this biota is involved in. We have shown that the wet subsurface area of the stream can maintain organic matter decomposition rates along those discharge fluctuations, attenuating the effect on the total, reach scale, decomposition.

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Published online 15 December 2015
Shell shape as indicator of pollution in marine gastropods affected by imposex 
M. A. Primost, G. Bigatti and F. Márquez

Geometric morphometrics of marine gastropods allow detecting whether the imposex incidence associated with TBT pollution (neoformation of penis in females) is related to shell-shape variation. This non-destructive technique could help monitor polluted areas without sacrificing animals through the use of gastropod shells as indicators.

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Published online 10 December 2015
How water level management affects cladoceran assemblages in lakes lateral to a reservoir 
José Roberto Debastiani-Júnior and Marcos Gomes Nogueira

The effects of operational water level depletion on cladocerans from two lakes bordering a Brazilian run-of-river reservoir were studied. Cladocera showed different responses depending on the connection between lake and reservoir. It is proposed that continuous application of management may lead to a shift in the steady-state equilibrium of the system and loss of diversity.

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    | Supplementary Material (62 KB)
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Published online 10 December 2015
Potential invasions of phytoplankton in ship ballast water at South Korean ports 
Bonggil Hyun, Kyoungsoon Shin, Min-Chul Jang, Pung-Guk Jang, Woo-Jin Lee, Chul Park and Keun-Hyung Choi

The survival and growth of ballast water-mediated phytoplankton communities was assessed, taking into account the specific growth rate, time delay for growth and initial dispersal. Most invasions appeared to fail at the initial dispersal phase. However, they could grow fast enough to overcome the initial dispersal phase if they were dispersed in highly eutrophic waters.

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    | Supplementary Material (326 KB)
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Published online 10 December 2015
Photobiology of the zoanthid Zoanthus sociatus in intertidal and subtidal habitats 
Miguel C. Leal, Igor C. S. Cruz, Carlos R. Mendes, Ricardo Calado, Ruy K. P. Kikuchi, Rui Rosa, Amadeu M. V. M. Soares, João Serôdio and Rui J. M. Rocha

We investigated the photobiology of a symbiotic zoanthid inhabiting different tidal environments: subtidal, intertidal pools and intertidal areas exposed to air during low tide. Results show significant differences in symbiont cell density, pigment content and photochemical efficiency among tidal habitats. These findings suggest that aerial exposure conditions affect photochemical processes but have no dramatic consequences such as bleaching.

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    | Supplementary Material (67 KB)
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Published online 10 December 2015
Age- and sex-dependent changes in morphometric and metabolic variables in the long-lived freshwater mussel Diplodon chilensis 
Maria S. Yusseppone, Betina J. Lomovasky, Carlos M. Luquet, Maria C. Ríos de Molina and Iara Rocchetta

The aging process in long-lived bivalves could affect metabolic variables. The aim of this study was to analyse possible changes in metabolic and morphometric variables over the lifetime of the freshwater mussel Diplodon chilensis. We propose an age-range (20–30 years old) that would be better suited for bioremediation strategies and would ensure an enhancement of the water and sediment cleansing in Patagonian freshwater bodies.

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Published online 10 December 2015
Diversity of ammonia-oxidising bacteria and archaea in seven different estuarine sediments from Poyang Lake 
Ping Sheng, Yizun Yu, Xiaojuan Tian, Dongsheng Wang, Zhihong Zhang and Jiannan Ding

Poyang Lake is the largest fresh water lake in China. However, nitrogen levels of the lake are increasing because of industrialisation and urbanisation, threatening the stability of the overall ecosystem around the lake areas. Our study indicated that the diversity of ammonia-oxidising bacterial and archaeal communities varied among the different estuaries, and several environmental factors significantly affected those microbial diversities.

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    | Supplementary Material (99 KB)
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Published online 10 December 2015
Spatial partitioning in the use of structural woody habitat supports the cohabitation of two cod species in a large lowland river 
J. A. Lieschke, J. P. Lyon, P. D. Moloney and S. J. Nicol

The use of different structural woody habitats, distance to bank and the interaction between habitats and distance to bank was investigated for Murray cod and trout cod in the mid Murray river, Australia. The study found that both species increased in abundance when structural woody habitat with hollows was present. However, distance to bank also played an important role in abundances, which has important relevance for stream managers.

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Published online 10 December 2015
Community structure of deep-water decapod crustaceans below the oxygen minimum zone in the south-east Gulf of California and analysis of environmental drivers 
Vanesa Papiol and Michel E. Hendrickx

Oxygen Minimum Zones (OMZs) strongly affect the distribution of megafauna. Bathymetric and seasonal patterns of distribution of decapod crustaceans were studied on the continental slopes off the Mexican Pacific, under the largest OMZ of the world. Bathymetric patterns in community composition were related to the swimming capacity and feeding strategies, and seasonal patterns were related to the community size structure. Oxygen, temperature and food were important drivers of those patterns.

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Published online 27 November 2015
Industrial past, urban future: using palaeo-studies to determine the industrial legacy of the Barwon Estuary, Victoria, Australia 
J. M. Reeves, P. A. Gell, S. M. Reichman, A. J. Trewarn and A. Zawadzki

Globally, estuaries are focal points of industry and human activity, leading to alteration and contamination. By looking at the sediment archive, we trace the major impacts on the Barwon Estuary through time, pinpointing major historical events in the system. This approach can be applied to estuaries worldwide to understand the natural state of the system and trajectory of change.

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Published online 27 November 2015
Predicting natural instream woody-habitat loads across large river networks 
Adrian Kitchingman, Zeb Tonkin, Renae M. Ayres, Jarod Lyon, Justin C. Stout, Ian D. Rutherfurd and Paul Wilson

Knowledge of natural or pre-disturbance instream woody-habitat (IWH) loads is useful to guide such restoration programs; however, such datasets are often unavailable. In the present study, natural IWH loads were mapped along 105 km of undisturbed rivers in south-eastern Australia then modelled for all major Victorian rivers. Distinct IWH-loading trends were noticeable over larger spatial scales. Eastern Victoria showed relatively lower natural IWH loads than did western Victoria.

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Published online 27 November 2015
Quantitative electron microprobe mapping of otoliths suggests elemental incorporation is affected by organic matrices: implications for the interpretation of otolith chemistry 
A. McFadden, B. Wade, C. Izzo, B. M. Gillanders, C. E. Lenehan and A. Pring

The aim of this study was to investigate the role of otolith biomineralisation in the relationship between otolith chemistry and microstructure at a fine scale in order to understand the mechanism of elemental uptake. The results indicate that strontium incorporation may be assisted, in part, by the organic composition during otolith mineralisation, which potentially has implications for the interpretation of otolith strontium.

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Published online 27 November 2015
Role of palaeoecology in describing the ecological character of wetlands 
C. Max Finlayson, Stewart J. Clarke, Nick C. Davidson and Peter Gell

The Ramsar Convention on Wetlands has requested advice on the determination of reference conditions for assessing change and establishing the range of natural variability of wetlands. Palaeoecological approaches provide a ready means of considering the trajectories of change, and the nature and drivers of change over time, and can be used along with contemporary techniques.

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Published online 24 November 2015
Otolith chemistry discriminates water mass occupancy of Arctic fish in the Chukchi Sea 
Christine M. Gleason, Brenda L. Norcross and Karen J. Spaleta

Chemical signatures in fish otoliths have the potential to reconstruct fish movement patterns and habitat use of Arctic marine fish. A fish occupying different demersal habitats resulted in 76% correct classification of Arctic (or Polar) cod and 82% for Arctic staghorn sculpin into the habitat from which fish were captured. Chemical signatures were affected by water temperature, fish age and fish length.

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Published online 24 November 2015
Potential sources of red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) recruits estimated with Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis of otolith chemical signatures 
Beverly K. Barnett, William F. Patterson, Todd Kellison, Steven B. Garner and Alan M. Shiller

Little information is available about the occurrence, distribution or habitat utilisation of red snapper juveniles in US Atlantic Ocean waters. Otolith chemical constituents were used to parameterise Markov Chain Monte Carlo models as a first-step approach in addressing questions about potential nursery sources contributing recruits to red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) in waters from southern Florida to North Carolina.

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Published online 24 November 2015
Lead–radium dating of Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) – validation of the young-fish scenario 
Allen H. Andrews

Estimates of age and growth are important to fish stock assessments aimed at fishery sustainability, but for Pacific cod (Gadus macrocephalus) longevity varies by a factor of 3. One scenario describes a slow-growing fish with a lifespan exceeding 30 years, while the other is fast growing to a maximum age near 10 years. Lead–radium dating revealed that the old-fish scenario is not valid.

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Published online 24 November 2015
Estuarine fishes of the South Alligator River, Kakadu National Park, northern Australia 
Bradley J. Pusey, Mark J. Kennard, Helen K. Larson, Quentin Alsop, Michael Hammer and Duncan J. Buckle

The estuarine fish fauna of the South Alligator River was sampled by beam trawl in both wet and dry seasons. Species richness was greatest in the lower estuary and more species were detected during the wet season. Temporal change in assemblage structure was associated with seasonal variation in discharge concordant with changes in salinity and productivity. Sciaenidae and Engraulidae dominated species richness and abundance overall although the species involved changed between seasons.

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    | Supplementary Material (651 KB)
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Published online 23 November 2015
Colonisation patterns of supralittoral arthropods in naturally stranded wrack debris on Atlantic sandy beaches of Brazil and Spain 
M. Carmen Ruiz-Delgado, Jenyffer Vierheller Vieira, M. José Reyes-Martínez, Carlos Alberto Borzone, Raimundo Outerelo, Juan Emilio Sánchez-Moyano and Francisco José García-García

Marine subsidies represent a key element for the maintenance of biodiversity and functioning of sandy beaches. The colonisation patterns of macroinvertebrates associated with detached seaweed and mangrove propagules was investigated on Atlantic beaches. Marine subsidies were promptly invaded by a wide range of species, but a directional replacement was not detected. The results suggest that the colonisation process is driven by organic-debris characteristics and biological strategies of the species.

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    | Supplementary Material (694 KB)
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Published online 23 November 2015
Spatio-temporal spawning patterns of two riverine populations of the threatened Macquarie perch (Macquaria australasica) 
Zeb Tonkin, Joanne Kearns, Justin O'Mahony and John Mahoney

This study presents an important first description of spatio-temporal spawning patterns of two riverine Macquarie perch Macquaria australasica populations in south-eastern Australia. Spawning intensity was highly variable between sample sites, and displayed a strong positive association with water temperature. Our results provide opportunity for further testing of the environmental effects, habitat associations and subsequent management options aimed at enhancing spawning of this endangered species.

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    | Supplementary Material (203 KB)
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Published online 06 November 2015
First evidence of multiple paternity in the bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas) 
Agathe Pirog, Sébastien Jaquemet, Marc Soria and Hélène Magalon

The present study reveals the occurrence of multiple paternity in the bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas) showing high paternal skew. These results tend to support the hypothesis of convenience polyandry. This study contributes to a better understanding of this species reproduction and are important for both shark conservation and management plans.

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    | Supplementary Material (215 KB)
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Published online 06 November 2015
Identifying the drivers of the pelagic ecosystem of an oligotrophic bight (KwaZulu–Natal, South Africa) using stable isotopes (δ13C, δ15N) and C:N ratio analysis 
Ander M. de Lecea, Rachel Cooper and Albertus J. Smit

This study aims to understand the biological drivers of KwaZulu–Natal Bight, South Africa, which until now were believed to be oceanographic. Particulate material and zooplankton were collected from marine and riverine environments. Rivers were extremely important for biological communities close to shore in the wet season. In the dry season and offshore this was not the case. Highlighting the role of terrestrial particulate matter to the marine environment.

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    | Supplementary Material (257 KB)
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Published online 06 November 2015
Validation of the first annual increment deposition in the otoliths of European anchovy in the Bay of Biscay based on otolith microstructure analysis 
Naroa Aldanondo, Unai Cotano, Paula Álvarez and Andrés Uriarte

Traditionally, the age of the European anchovy has been determined on the basis of interpretation of annual growth increments. Based on otolith microstructure analysis, this study confirms that the first annulus is composed of an opaque band, which is deposited during spring and summer, and a translucent band, which is formed during autumn and winter. Consequently, the study validates age determination based on these structures and shows that otolith macrostructure analysis is a reliable tool for age determination of anchovy.

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Published online 06 November 2015
Where do elements bind within the otoliths of fish? 
Christopher Izzo, Zoë A. Doubleday and Bronwyn M. Gillanders

The element composition of fish ear bones (otoliths) is used extensively to reconstruct environmental histories of fish. Determining where elements are incorporated within otoliths is imperative to improving interpretations based on otolith chemistry. This study sought to determine whether elements were incorporated into the protein or mineral components of otoliths and the relative proportion of each element in each component.

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Published online 04 November 2015
Can tributary in-flows improve the recovery of the dissolved organic carbon regime in a snowmelt river regulated by a large reservoir? 
Ann-Marie Rohlfs, Simon M. Mitrovic, Simon Williams and Daniel Coleman

In regulated rivers, tributary organic matter inputs can make a particularly important contribution to the energetic resource base. We examined dissolved organic carbon dynamics below a large reservoir, and found that tributary carbon inputs to the main-stem were detectable but reduced by upstream diversions of tributary water. Our study is an example of the growing consideration of dissolved organic carbon in environmental water delivery and river rehabilitation.

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Published online 04 November 2015
Assessment of a metaviromic dataset generated from nearshore Lake Michigan 
Siobhan C. Watkins, Neil Kuehnle, C. Anthony Ruggeri, Kema Malki, Katherine Bruder, Jinan Elayyan, Kristina Damisch, Naushin Vahora, Paul O'Malley, Brieanne Ruggles-Sage, Zachary Romer and Catherine Putonti

Recent research has determined that bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria), play a crucial role in environmental processes. However, phage diversity is understudied in freshwater environments. The current study utilises data collected from extracting DNA directly from the environment, and begins to examine the phage community in Lake Michigan. The research finds that, within the lake, phages are highly diverse, but also highlights the importance of combined methodological approaches.

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    | Supplementary Material (169 KB)
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Published online 04 November 2015
Evaluating the hydrological, geothermal and anthropic factors in the Baños tarn (Spanish Pyrenees) 
Z. Santolaria, T. Arruebo, A. Pardo, C. Rodriguez-Casals, F. J. Lanaja and J. S. Urieta

Baños tarn is a low-altitude Pyrenean glacial lake with both geothermal and surface influxes, and significant local anthropic stressors. Hydrological changes affecting lake tributaries are the foremost factors driving seasonal changes in the ionic composition of the lake, determined by a slightly alkaline pH and a medium–high ionic content, whereas resuspension of organic matter and nutrients trapped in floor sediments by a long history of untreated waste water input is the main nutrient source for the Baños tarn water mass.

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    | Supplementary Material (85 KB)
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Published online 04 November 2015
Trophic positions and predator–prey mass ratio of the pelagic food web in the East China Sea and Sea of Japan 
Seiji Ohshimo, Hiroshige Tanaka, Koh Nishiuchi and Tohya Yasuda

Predator–prey mass ratio (PPMR) and trophic positions of the pelagic food web in the East China Sea and the Sea of Japan were estimated by using the stable isotope ratios (δ15N). The PPMRs based on additive and scaled models were respectively 5032 and 3430. The comparatively high PPMRs could reflect low ecosystem transfer efficiency and high metabolic rate.

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Published online 04 November 2015
Marine and estuarine phylogeography of the coasts of south-eastern Australia 
D. J. Colgan

Factors such as areas of unsuitable habitat, physical geography, ocean currents and sea surface temperatures explain many features of the phylogeography of the coasts of south-eastern Australia. More research is needed to explain how genetic variation can remain partitioned after barriers to gene flow are dissolved, to understand the phylogeographic effects of biotic interactions and to elucidate the cause(s) of population genetic instability frequently observed within both marine and estuarine species.

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Published online 04 November 2015
Seasonal variability in turbidity currents in Lake Ohau, New Zealand, and their influence on sedimentation 
R. Cossu, A. L. Forrest, H. A. Roop, G. B. Dunbar, M. J. Vandergoes, R. H. Levy, P. Stumpner and S. G. Schladow

This paper reports observations of turbidity currents and internal waves made in 2012–13 in Lake Ohau, New Zealand. Sediment input from river inflow occurs throughout the year but exhibits strong seasonal variation. We utilise these observations to establish a conceptual model to explain the observed infill stratigraphy in Lake Ohau and guide interpretation of the longer sedimentary record.

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Published online 04 November 2015
Finding the needle in the haystack: comparing sampling methods for detecting an endangered freshwater fish 
Mark Lintermans

Accurately detecting the presence of threatened species is vital for effective conservation management. Investigation of the detection power of six sampling methods for the endangered Macquarie perch found that fyke nets were far superior to all other methods. Some commonly used generic sampling methods had low detection efficiency, with such false negatives having serious implications for conservation management.

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Published online 04 November 2015
Carbon and nutrient subsidies to a lowland river following floodplain inundation 
Daryl L. Nielsen, Robert A. Cook, Nathan Ning, Ben Gawne and Rochelle Petrie

Inputs of terrestrial carbon and nutrients from floodplains into rivers is believed to be important to the functioning of lowland rivers. This study demonstrates that carbon in the form of dissolved organic carbon was the major component exported. However smaller amounts of carbon was also exported as invertebrates and algae that potentially could be readily incorporated into food webs

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Published online 27 October 2015
Unresolved diversity and monthly dynamics of eukaryotic phytoplankton in a temperate freshwater reservoir explored by pyrosequencing 
Thangavelu Boopathi and Jang-Seu Ki

Monthly dynamics of eukaryotic phytoplankton diversity and community structure in a freshwater reservoir were studied using small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU) pyrosequencing. Molecular analyses represented a typical pattern of seasonal phytoplankton succession in temperate regions and this was denoted predominantly by diatoms, dinoflagellates, cryptophytes and chlorophytes. This work emphasises the importance of pyrosequencing in monitoring phytoplankton communities.

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Published online 26 October 2015
Comparative dietary ecology of turtles (Chelodina burrungandjii and Emydura victoriae) across the Kimberley Plateau, Western Australia, prior to the arrival of cane toads 
N. N. FitzSimmons, P. Featherston and A. D. Tucker

We contrasted dietary ecology of two river turtles across four monsoonal river systems of the Kimberley Plateau in Western Australia. The study sites crossed a rainfall gradient and variable land use practices. The effects of biological invasion (short term), land use (medium term) and climate change (long term) affect the foraging habitats of turtles in these rivers. The dietary results offer a benchmark in before–after studies as invasive cane toads are expected to reach the study sites in 1–2 years.

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    | Supplementary Material (295 KB)
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Published online 26 October 2015
New parameterisation method for three-dimensional otolith surface images 
P. Marti-Puig, J. Danés, A. Manjabacas and A. Lombarte

This paper presents a new method for compacting data from three-dimensional (3-D) otolith shapes. These shapes are defined by means of clouds of points across their surfaces and they are finally represented by a small set of parameters able to capture 3-D information relevant to classification of fish species. The use of these new parameters provides a greater percentage of correctly classified specimens compared with those obtained from two-dimensional analysis.

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Published online 22 October 2015
Experimental effects of ash deposition on macroinvertebrate assemblages in peatland streams 
K. Johnston and B. J. Robson

The effects of ash from controlled fires on macroinvertebrate communities in UK headwater streams were investigated experimentally by depositing ash onto natural stream substrata in trays placed on streambeds. Ash deposition together with stream depth altered macroinvertebrate community composition. However, changes in species composition caused by ash deposition were smaller than differences among streams, suggesting that effects of ash may be small in these streams.

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Published online 22 October 2015
Image-enhanced burnt otoliths, bomb radiocarbon and the growth dynamics of redfish (Sebastes mentella and S. fasciatus) off the eastern coast of Canada 
Steven E. Campana, Alexandra E. Valentin, Shayne E. MacLellan and Joanne B. Groot

Many past attempts to age deep-water redfish (Sebastes mentella) and Acadian redfish (S. fasciatus) in the north-west Atlantic have been stymied by the use of inaccurate ageing methods, which have led to stock collapse in other deep-water species. Herein we report substantial improvements in methods for ageing Sebastes spp. through a combination of sectioning, burning and image enhancement. Bomb radiocarbon assays and microsatellite DNA confirmed both the accuracy of the ages and species identity, and demonstrated significant growth differences between both species and stocks to an age of 70 years.

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Published online 21 October 2015
Spatiotemporal dynamics of intermittent stream fish metacommunities in response to prolonged drought and reconnectivity 
Lucas J. Driver and David J. Hoeinghaus

Hydrological regimes are important drivers of community dynamics in intermittent streams. Investigation of stream fish communities from north Texas, USA, before, during and after a prolonged drought disturbance revealed that drought had significant impacts on fish abundance and diversity and population and community recovery. Continued alteration of stream habitats and changes in global climate may intensify future drought disturbances and have potentially large impacts on freshwater biodiversity at multiple scales.

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    | Supplementary Material (784 KB)
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Published online 21 October 2015
Otolith shape variation provides a marker of stock origin for north Atlantic bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus) 
Deirdre Brophy, Paula Haynes, Haritz Arrizabalaga, Igaratza Fraile, Jean Marc Fromentin, Fulvio Garibaldi, Ivan Katavic, Fausto Tinti, F. Saadet Karakulak, David Macías, Dheeraj Busawon, Alex Hanke, Ai Kimoto, Osamu Sakai, Simeon Deguara, Nouredinne Abid and Miguel Neves Santos

Otolith shape analysis discriminated between western and eastern Atlantic bluefin tuna with an accuracy of 83% and indicated that samples from known mixing areas in the east Atlantic and Mediterranean were predominantly of eastern origin. Otolith shape descriptors could be used in combination with other population markers to improve the accuracy of stock discrimination and estimation of mixing rates for Atlantic bluefin tuna.

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Published online 21 October 2015
Use of otolith quality flags to assess distributional dynamics in Baltic cod stocks 
Sven Stötera and Uwe Krumme

The mixing dynamics between the two Baltic Sea cod stocks are unclear. Analysis of spatiotemporal patterns in quality flag distribution of cod otoliths showed that the Darß and Drogden sills separated readable otoliths in shallow western waters from more unreadable otoliths in deeper eastern waters. There were no temporal trends suggesting stable mixing and no increased spillover from the east since 2007.

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   | Supplementary Material (2.9 MB)  |        Open Access Article
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Published online 21 October 2015
Substrate mapping of three rivers in a Ramsar wetland in Jamaica: a comparison of data collection (hydroacoustic v. grab samples), classification and kriging methods 
Kurt Prospere, Kurt McLaren and Byron Wilson

The knowledge of the distribution of substrate sediments is crucial to understanding and managing wetland aquatic bodies. We tested the ability of a hydroacoustic system to discern and map substrates in three rivers from the largest wetland in Jamaica, by using various classification algorithms and interpolation methods. At a lower spatial resolution, comparable maps were obtained by interpolating discrete sample points acquired from grab samples.

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Published online 19 October 2015
Accumulation of sulfidic sediments in a channelised inland river system, southern Australia 
Vanessa N. L. Wong, Michael D. Cheetham, Richard T. Bush, Leigh A. Sullivan and Nicholas J. Ward

This study identified sulfidic sediments in reaches of an inland freshwater river in south-eastern Australia. Sulfidic sediments preferentially accumulated where coarse sandy bed material was found. Conversely, limited sulfidic sediment accumulated where bed material was clay or silt dominated. Sulfidic sediment accumulation was not limited to lower-energy parts of the channel highlighting the dynamism of the system.

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    | Supplementary Material (349 KB)
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Published online 19 October 2015
Lobster in a bottle: a novel technique for observing the predation of juvenile spiny lobster (Jasus edwardsii) 
Jan Hesse, Jenni A. Stanley and Andrew G. Jeffs

A novel approach was developed for observing attempted predation on live juvenile spiny lobster (Jasus edwardsii) by presenting the lobster in a transparent container that was lit with infrared light to enable continuous monitoring, by video recording. This technique can be used to provide valuable information on overall relative predation pressure from comparative locations and habitats, as well as identify potential predators.

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    | Supplementary Material (36 MB)
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Published online 13 October 2015
How does the management of rice in natural ponds alter aquatic insect community functional structure? 
Marina S. Dalzochio, Renata Baldin, Cristina Stenert and Leonardo Maltchik

Functional approaches improve the understanding of how ecological communities respond to environmental changes. We compared functional diversity of aquatic insects among natural ponds, and organic and conventional rice fields, and the highest functional redundancy and richness were observed in natural ponds. As organic rice fields showed some functional similarity with natural ponds, the ecological benefits of organic production are highlighted.

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    | Supplementary Material (142 KB)
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Published online 13 October 2015
Assessment of stocking effectiveness for Murray cod (Maccullochella peelii) and golden perch (Macquaria ambigua) in rivers and impoundments of south-eastern Australia 
Jamin Forbes, Robyn J. Watts, Wayne A. Robinson, Lee J. Baumgartner, Prue McGuffie, Leo M. Cameron and David A. Crook

Murray cod and golden perch have been released from government and private hatcheries since the late 1970s in response to large scale wild fishery declines. Assessing success of these long-term stocking programs has been limited. Hatchery-reared fish were marked with calcein prior to release. The contribution of marked Murray cod varied by 7–94% and 9–98% for marked golden perch with higher proportions of marked fish found in impoundments than rivers. The comparatively low proportion of marked fish in rivers suggests that these populations are primarily self-supporting through natural recruitment rather than artificial enhancement. Identifying self-sustaining fish populations, and conversely, those that are heavily reliant on stocking, will allow delivery of hatchery-reared fish to areas where they are most needed.

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Published online 13 October 2015
Contribution of stocked fish to riverine populations of golden perch (Macquaria ambigua) in the Murray–Darling Basin, Australia 
David A. Crook, Damien J. O'Mahony, Bronwyn M. Gillanders, Andrew R. Munro, Andrew C. Sanger, Stephen Thurstan and Lee J. Baumgartner

Most stocking of native fish is conducted without information on its effectiveness or impacts. We stocked chemically tagged golden perch (Macquaria ambigua) fingerlings in three rivers of the Murray–Darling Basin (MDB), Australia. Subsequent sampling found that stocked fish contributed 18–100% of year classes within each river, demonstrating the potential for artificial stocking to strongly influence the abundance and structure of golden perch populations in the MDB.

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Published online 13 October 2015
Repeated vertical movements of mature anguillid eels in a lake 
Yuuki Y. Watanabe, Takaomi Arai, Daniel Limbong, Yunober Mberato and Nobuyuki Miyazaki

Mature anguillid eels in Lake Poso, Indonesia, are found to repeat up-and-down movements in the water column (maximum depth, 77 m), with slower, less active descents with shallower postures, followed by faster, more active ascents with steeper postures. These characteristic movements might be owing to the eels’ internal motivation for continuous swimming in preparation for oceanic migration.

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Published online 13 October 2015
Physiological plasticity v. inter-population variability: understanding drivers of hypoxia tolerance in a tropical estuarine fish 
Geoffrey Mark Collins, Timothy Darren Clark and Alexander Guy Carton

Hypoxia is increasing in freshwater and estuarine systems globally, yet we know little about the ability for tropical fish to acclimate to this changing environment. This study investigated the acclimation potential of two geographically separated populations of barramundi (L. calcarifer) to fluctuating oxygen availability. Hypoxia tolerance improved similarly in both populations and was driven primarily by physiological plasticity, rather than inherent variability between populations.

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Published online 13 October 2015
Adaptive management in action: using chemical marking to advance fish recovery programs in the Murray–Darling Basin 
Lee Baumgartner
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Published online 07 October 2015
Large tropical fishes and their use of the nearshore littoral, intertidal and subtidal habitat mosaic 
Merritt E. Adkins, Colin A. Simpfendorfer and Andrew J. Tobin

Shallow-coastal habitat research has previously focussed on larvae and juvenile fish communities and their use of these habitats as nurseries. The current study focuses on sampling a mosaic of shallow-coastal habitats and identifying the large-bodied fish communities utilising these habitats. We suggest these habitats may provide multiple functions for large-bodied fish communities and new insight into the additional functions of shallow-coastal habitats.

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Published online 07 October 2015
Comparison of life histories of two deep-water sharks from eastern Australia: the piked spurdog and the Philippine spurdog 
Cassandra L. Rigby, Ross K. Daley and Colin A. Simpfendorfer

A tropical population of the piked spurdog was found to be smaller and older at maturity than temperate populations. The Philippine spurdog was late maturing and long lived at 27 years. Both species were slow growing with conservative life history traits that make them vulnerable to exploitation but, in the event of overfishing, the deeper-dwelling Philippine spurdog is likely to take longer to recover.

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    | Supplementary Material (217 KB)
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Published online 05 October 2015
How sensitive are invertebrates to riparian-zone replanting in stream ecosystems? 
Darren P. Giling, Ralph Mac Nally and Ross M. Thompson

Replanting native vegetation adjacent to agricultural streams aims to improve in-stream biodiversity but the capacity of such replanting to combat the effects of large-scale land-use change is unknown. We tested whether aquatic macroinvertebrates responded to streamside replanting, but found that whole-catchment factors were more important. Replanting in degraded areas may not restore aquatic biodiversity within decades, necessitating careful consideration of restoration aims and monitoring methods.

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    | Supplementary Material (138 KB)
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Published online 05 October 2015
Trajectory of an anthropogenically induced ecological regime shift in a New Zealand shallow coastal lake 
Marc Schallenberg and Émilie Saulnier-Talbot

Shallow coastal lakes are sensitive to human-induced environmental changes. Post-colonial land-use change and water level control in and around Wainono Lagoon, South Canterbury, New Zealand, transformed it from a clear, macrophyte-dominated freshwater state to a turbid, hypereutrophic brackish system with little or no macrophytes. This study illustrates how the palaeolimnological approach can provide useful knowledge to assist the management and safeguard of these vulnerable ecosystems.

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Published online 05 October 2015
The potential effects of anthropogenic climate change on evaporation from water storage reservoirs within the Lockyer Catchment, south-east Queensland, Australia 
Ryan McGloin, Hamish McGowan and David McJannet

This study examines the potential impacts of anthropogenic climate change on evaporation from small reservoirs in the Lockyer catchment in south-east Queensland, Australia. Future projections indicated that evaporation is expected to increase by ~6% by 2050. This predicted increase in evaporation, combined with expected reductions in rainfall and runoff, means that water resources may be significantly affected in the future.

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Published online 05 October 2015
Assessing spatial variation of seagrass habitat structure in New Caledonia: an integrated approach 
Andrew D. Irving, Emma L. Jackson and Rebecca A. Hendry

A novel integrated sampling method was used to score the structure of seagrass meadows in the New Caledonian lagoon. On average, meadows scored at 69/100, indicating ‘fair-to-good’ structure, although significant variation was evident among sites and appeared to reflect differences in wave exposure. The study shows the value of integrated sampling methods for rapid spatio-temporal comparisons that can provide early warning signs of habitat decline.

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    | Supplementary Material (23 KB)
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Published online 30 September 2015
Home-range size in juveniles of the temperate reef fish, the common triplefin (Forsterygion lapillum) 
Paul J. Mensink and Jeffrey S. Shima

The size of an organism's home range dictates the spatial scale on which ecological processes occur. Many reef fish have limited home-ranges and here, we quantify variability in the home-ranges of juveniles of an abundant reef fish in New Zealand, the common triplefin. Results suggest that individual space use becomes restricted when densities of neighbouring conspecifics surpass a critical threshold, which could reduce individual fitness in high density areas as well as shape the spatial distribution of juveniles across a population.

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Published online 30 September 2015
Zoobenthos are minor dietary components of small omnivorous fishes in a shallow eutrophic lake 
Natsuru Yasuno, Yuki Chiba, Yasufumi Fujimoto, Kentaro Shindo, Tetsuo Shimada, Shuichi Shikano and Eisuke Kikuchi

We analysed isotopic composition of small omnivorous fishes (smaller than ~100 mm long) to examine whether they integrate littoral, pelagic and benthic pathways in a shallow, eutrophic lake (Lake Izunuma, Japan). Five omnivorous fish relied mostly on epiphytic algae and zooplankton, whereas zoobenthos (larval chironomids) contributed little to their diets. Thus, in Lake Izunuma, omnivorous fishes incorporated both littoral and pelagic production into the food web, but rarely benthic production.

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Published online 28 September 2015
Interspecific differences in larval production and dispersal in non-migratory galaxiids: implications for metapopulation structure 
Peter E. Jones and Gerard P. Closs

Poorly understood larval recruitment and dispersal can drive fish population dynamics; we studied how interspecific life-history differences affected these processes in a group of closely related galaxiids. Consistent with a priori predictions, the larvae of ‘fast’ life-history species were abundant and dispersed widely, whereas 'slow' life-history species produced low numbers of larvae which were relatively sedentary. We discuss the implications of these findings for metapopulation structure and how these species interact with invasive salmonids.

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    | Supplementary Material (158 KB)
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Published online 28 September 2015
Microphytoplankton and ciliate communities’ structure and distribution in a stressed area of the south coast of Sfax, Tunisia (eastern Mediterranean Sea) 
Amira Rekik, Jannet Elloumi, Dorra Chaari and Habib Ayadi

The environmental parameters, microphytoplankton and ciliate communities in the area were studied in two seasons at 20 stations along the coast south of Sfax. The results showed that the environmental parameters indicated high nutrient levels. Seventy-eight microphytoplankton species and 58 ciliates species were identified in all stations. Some species reported in this study are commonly found in the stressed coastal waters.

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Published online 28 September 2015
Variation in morphology and life-history strategy of an exploited sparid fish 
D. M. Parsons, M. A. Morrison, B. M. Gillanders, K. D. Clements, S. J. Bury, R. Bian and K. T. Spong

Defining population units that balance productivity and yield is a fundamental aspect of resource management. We investigated the presence of groups of snapper with different life-history strategies within the Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand, using a range of techniques. Snapper collected from a known spawning area possessed distinct morphology and stable isotope ratios, suggesting the existence of a semi-pelagic group of snapper within the Hauraki Gulf stock.

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Published online 28 September 2015
Feeding ecology of two sympatric species of Acetes (Decapoda: Sergestidae) in Panguil Bay, the Philippines 
Ephrime B. Metillo, Emily E. Cadelinia, Ken-ichi Hayashizaki, Takashi Tsunoda and Shuhei Nishida

Krill-like shrimps A. erythraeus and A. intermedius live together in Panguil Bay, Philippines and have an overlapping diet of primarily zooplankton and detritus. However, they partition the feeding niche with differences in prey types, gut fullness over 24 h and among months, sources of plant detritus, and with A. erythraeus confined to more brackish waters and A. intermedius dwelling in more saline marine waters of the bay.

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Published online 28 September 2015
Marine and continental distribution and dynamic of the early spawning migration of twaite shad (Alosa fallax (Lacépède, 1803)) and allis shad (Alosa alosa (Linnaeus, 1758)) in the north-west of the Iberian Peninsula 
D. J. Nachón, M. Mota, C. Antunes, M. J. Servia and F. Cobo

The aim of the present study was to determine the distribution and migration of twaite and allis shad in the north-west of the Iberian Peninsula. To this end, official data records of marine landings were collected and freshwater field sampling campaigns were undertaken. Results show that both species exhibit a coastal distribution near the rivers where they spawn, namely the Minho and Ulla rivers.

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Published online 28 September 2015
Low diversity of helminth parasites in Sardina pilchardus and Engraulis encrasicolus (Clupeidae) from the Bay of Biscay 
Aurélie Dessier, Christine Dupuy, Thomas Trancart, Alexandre Audras, Paco Bustamante and Claudia Gérard

Studies of the parasitic helminths in Sardina pilchardus and Engraulis encrasicolus from the Bay of Biscay revealed the occurrence of only three species of nematodes in both fish species. This low diversity of helminth parasites, compared with the 39 and 15 taxa for S. pilchardus and E. encrasicolus respectively described throughout their distribution range, suggests a low free-living biodiversity in the Bay of Biscay, potentially indicative of stressed ecosystems.

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Published online 28 September 2015
Geographic distribution of the short-tailed river stingray (Potamotrygon brachyura): assessing habitat loss and fishing as threats to the world’s largest obligate freshwater elasmobranch 
Luis O. Lucifora, Santiago A. Barbini, Sabina Llamazares Vegh, Pablo A. Scarabotti, Facundo Vargas, Agustín Solari, Ezequiel Mabragaña and Juan M. Díaz de Astarloa

Freshwater elasmobranchs are threatened but little known. This paper shows that Potamotrygon brachyura is associated to large lowland rivers, and that most of its range in the Río de la Plata is subject to high levels of habitat modification, whereas in the Uruguay and Paraná basins fishing pressure is its main stressor. P. brachyura may function as an umbrella species.

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Published online 25 September 2015
Using palaeoecological and palaeoenvironmental records to guide restoration, conservation and adaptive management of Ramsar freshwater wetlands: lessons from the Everglades, USA 
Melanie Ann Riedinger-Whitmore

Paleoecological records show how climate, environmental factors and human activities influenced the origin and development of the Everglades, the largest Ramsar wetland in the USA. This review highlights research and describes how paleoecological data are used in restoration plans and ecological models for Everglades management. Paleoecological studies of Ramsar wetlands can enhance our understanding about properties that determine the ecological character of wetlands, and can guide restoration and conservation activities.

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Published online 21 September 2015
Comparative mitogenomic analyses reveal cryptic diversity of the bryozoan Bugula neritina Linnaeus, 1758, in the Yellow Sea 
Xin Shen, Mei Tian, Ka Hou Chu, Jin Feng Wang, Shuai Chen, Hui Lian Liu, Xiao Heng Zhao and Fang Qing Zhao

The mitochondrial genome of Bugula neritina sampled from Qingdao, China, was determined, and was compared with that of a specimen sampled from Taean Gun, South Korea. The results indicated that the two specimens are genetically distinct species. The new type from Qingdao is designated as Type Y, for its occurrence in the Yellow Sea. The geographical range of different types of B. neritina awaits further studies.

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    | Supplementary Material (558 KB)
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Published online 16 September 2015
A new tool in the toolbox for large-scale, high-throughput fisheries mark-recapture studies using genetic identification 
Russell W. Bradford, Peta Hill, Campbell Davies and Peter Grewe

Management procedures for high-value fisheries can be hampered by a lack of fishery-independent estimates of abundance and mortality. Traditionally these estimates have been derived in part with the use of tagging technologies. This paper provides a description of a new tagging technology which may allow managers to take advantage of fishery-independent gene tag technology within large-scale, high-throughput tagging programs.

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   | Supplementary Material (1.5 MB)  |        Open Access Article
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Published online 16 September 2015
High-resolution movements of critically endangered hawksbill turtles help elucidate conservation requirements in northern Australia 
Xavier Hoenner, Scott D. Whiting, Mark Hamann, Colin J. Limpus, Mark A. Hindell and Clive R. McMahon

Despite being critically endangered, the behaviour of hawksbill turtles remains poorly understood, especially for populations nesting in the Northern Territory, Australia. Satellite telemetry showed that adult females remain close to their rookery during the breeding period before migrating to feed in the Gulf of Carpentaria. National and international conservation efforts are required to mitigate human impacts including illegal tortoiseshell trade or seabed mining exploitation.

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Published online 10 September 2015
Population structure in a wide-ranging coastal teleost (Argyrosomus japonicus, Sciaenidae) reflects marine biogeography across southern Australia 
Thomas C. Barnes, Claudia Junge, Steven A. Myers, Mathew D. Taylor, Paul J. Rogers, Greg J. Ferguson, Jason A. Lieschke, Stephen C. Donnellan and Bronwyn M. Gillanders

Predatory scale-fish may be under pressure on a global scale due to anthropogenic forces; the legendary sciaenid Argyrosomus japonicus (mulloway, jewfish or kob) is no exception. Despite the species forming important fisheries much of its biology is poorly understood, we set out to alleviate this by investigating the genetic population structure at two levels, first, between South Africa and Australia and second, within Australia; our results report significant structuring. An understanding of the population structure of fish can help ensure a sustainable future

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    | Supplementary Material (395 KB)
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Published online 07 September 2015
Surviving under pressure and protection: a review of the biology, ecology and population status of the highly vulnerable grouper Epinephelus daemelii 
Malcolm P. Francis, David Harasti and Hamish A. Malcolm

Epinephelus daemelii is a threatened grouper species restricted to the south-western Pacific Ocean. Its biology, behaviour and limited habitat make it vulnerable to overfishing. Despite protection, incidental bycatch still occurs. Its abundance is low, except in remote regions with no fishing. Further prohibitions on fishing are likely to be important for the recovery and long-term survival of this species.

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Published online 07 September 2015
Spatial genetic subdivision among populations of the highly migratory black marlin Istiompax indica within the central Indo-Pacific 
Samuel M. Williams, Michael B. Bennett, Julian G. Pepperell, Jess A. T. Morgan and Jennifer R. Ovenden

Highly migratory marine fishes are often assumed to lack population structure due to the absence of physical barriers to gene flow. We used genetic markers to evaluate the population structure of the black marlin throughout the central Indo-Pacific. The nuclear markers revealed three contemporary populations that are likely driven by reproductive philopatry, whereas the mitochondrial markers identified pronounced historic clade structure.

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    | Supplementary Material (122 KB)
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Published online 04 September 2015
Using sedimentary diatoms to identify reference conditions and historical variability in shallow lake ecosystems in the Yangtze floodplain 
Xuhui Dong, Xiangdong Yang, Xu Chen, Qian Liu, Min Yao, Rong Wang and Min Xu

Reference condition and historical variability of aquatic ecosystems are key features of wetland systems. Based on diatom records from 10 Yangtze lakes, this study defined their ecological and chemical reference conditions, the historical variability and its controlling factors. This study demonstrates the robustness of palaeolimnological techniques in reconstructing the historical ecological characters of lake ecosystems, which may provide essential information for the management of wider types of wetland.

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Published online 04 September 2015
Widespread occurrence of coral diseases in the central Maldives 
Simone Montano, Giovanni Strona, Davide Seveso, Davide Maggioni and Paolo Galli

Coral diseases have been poorly studied in the Indian Ocean, and particularly in the Republic of Maldives. The results of this study represent the first comprehensive assessment of coral diseases in this archipelago and provide a useful baseline that can serve as a gauge for monitoring future change. The study reveals that large colonies are more susceptible to coral diseases than small ones, and that the dominant genus Acropora hosts the highest number of diseased colonies.

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    | Supplementary Material (235 KB)
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Published online 04 September 2015
Developing a habitat classification typology for subtidal habitats in a temperate estuary in New South Wales, Australia 
Tom R. Davis, David Harasti and Stephen D. A. Smith

Effective estuarine management depends on adequate data about habitats. This study presents the first quantitative assessment of subtidal habitats within the Port Stephens estuary, using a methodology that was cost-effective and robust. We identified previously undocumented habitat types and found strong correlations between habitat types and depth.

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Published online 04 September 2015
Trophic relationships of the platypus: insights from stable isotope and cheek pouch dietary analyses 
Melissa Klamt, Jenny A. Davis, Ross M. Thompson, Richard Marchant and Tom R. Grant

As a top predator, the platypus has the potential to exert a strong top-down influence within riverine food webs. We utilised a combination of cheek pouch content analysis and stable isotope analysis to determine the platypuses' diet. Whereas the cheek-pouch content analysis identified the majority of the prey organisms, stable isotope analysis suggested that soft-bodied organisms (e.g. larval dipterans) are also a strong contributor to the platypuses' diet.

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Published online 01 September 2015
Tasman Sea biological response to dust storm events during the austral spring of 2009 
A. J. Gabric, R. Cropp, G. McTainsh, H. Butler, B. M. Johnston, T. O'Loingsigh and Dien Van Tran

The marine biological impact of ‘Red Dawn’ dust storm that affected eastern Australia during the spring of 2009 is examined. Dust transport modelling confirms this storm event deposited up to three times the average monthly amount of dust to the adjacent ocean. Phytoplankton biomass in the Tasman Sea increased significantly due to the atmospheric deposition of dust-associated nutrients.

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Published online 01 September 2015
Primacy of bottom-up effects on a butterflyfish assemblage 
Susannah M. Leahy, Garry R. Russ and Rene A. Abesamis

Understanding what factors determine the number and type of fish on coral reefs is important for effective management of these fragile systems. In this study, we compared the effects of habitat and predation on two major feeding types of butterflyfish, and found that live coral and macroalgae were the strongest determinants of butterflyfish abundance. These results encourage wider-scale management of coral reefs to promote coral health.

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Published online 31 August 2015
Assessing wetland degradation and loss of ecosystem services in the Niger Delta, Nigeria 
Ayansina Ayanlade and Ulrike Proske

Freshwater wetlands in the Niger Delta, Nigeria, are increasingly under threat from human activities. In the two studied wetlands substantial ecosystem service loss has occurred over the last ~30 years. These results highlight the need for better wetland conservation measures in Nigeria.

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Published online 31 August 2015
The Gippsland Lakes: management challenges posed by long-term environmental change 
Paul I. Boon, Perran Cook and Ryan Woodland

The Gippsland Lakes is one of the largest Ramsar-listed wetlands in south-eastern Australia. The ecology of the Lakes has changed markedly over the past 120+ years as a result of the permanent opening to the ocean at Lakes Entrance and the regulation of inflowing rivers. Sea-level rise will exacerbate these changes, and how to manage them is a daunting challenge to natural-resource managers.

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Published online 31 August 2015
Implications of environmental trajectories for Limits of Acceptable Change: a case study of the Riverland Ramsar site, South Australia 
Peter R. Newall, Lance N. Lloyd, Peter A. Gell and Keith F. Walker

Changing climate threatens to exacerbate impacts of water extraction upon Australia’s high value aquatic ecosystems. This study of the Riverland Ramsar site suggests that individually, climate change and water extraction will each change the ecological character of the site. Results suggest that future management of wetlands in south-eastern Australia will need to consider regional vulnerability, refuge prioritisation and ecological returns-on-water-investments.

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Published online 31 August 2015
High-resolution, multiproxy palaeoenvironmental changes recorded from Two Mile Lake, southern Western Australia: implications for Ramsar-listed playa sites 
C. Gouramanis, P. De Deckker, D. Wilkins and J. Dodson

Sedimentary records recovered from saline playa lakes offer unique opportunities to investigate environmental and climatic variation in arid and semi-arid zones. Multiproxy records and multiple dating techniques are applied to derive a very high resolution record of environmental and climatic variability from the Two Mile Lake playa in southern Western Australia. Palaeorecords can define environmental baseline conditions and variability that can be utilized in managing playa systems.

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    | Supplementary Material (543 KB)
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Published online 27 August 2015
The contribution of migratory mesopelagic fishes to neuston fish assemblages across the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans 
M. Pilar Olivar, J. Ignacio González-Gordillo, Jordi Salat, Guillem Chust, Andrés Cózar, Santiago Hernández-León, M. Luz Fernández de Puelles and Xabier Irigoien

The neuston is a rich environment inhabited by a large variety of species. Some myctophids (mesopelagic fishes) reach this layer during their night feeding migrations, constituting an important resource competitor for the neustonic-dwelling species. Surface temperature is the main environmental variable shaping the distribution of neustonic species, whereas myctophids are also influenced by the minimum oxygen concentrations in the water column.

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Published online 27 August 2015
Biology of a marine estuarine-opportunist fish species in a microtidal estuary, including comparisons among decades and with coastal waters 
Lauren J. Veale, Peter G. Coulson, Norman G. Hall and Ian C. Potter

This study explored the benefits to a marine fish species of using both estuaries and nearshore coastal waters as nursery habitats. The abundance, growth and reproductive status of Pelates octolineatus in a large estuary are thus compared with those in marine waters. Many individuals use the estuary for an extended period and grow faster there than in coastal marine waters.

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Published online 27 August 2015
Reproductive pattern and sexual system of the nocturnal seagrass shrimp Ambidexter symmetricus (Decapoda: Caridea: Processidae) in a Florida bay 
Jennifer A. Rasch and Raymond T. Bauer

The goal of our research was to analyse the reproductive ecology and sexual system in a nocturnal seagrass shrimp. We found sex ratios support a gonochoric sexual system, seasonal breeding with successive spawns, sexual dimorphism and that the interaction of time of year, shrimp sex and parasite presence influenced shrimp size. This data support hypotheses about latitudinal trends in other marine species.

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Published online 27 August 2015
Patterns of shelter use and their effects on the relative survival of subadult California spiny lobster (Panulirus interruptus) 
Amalia M. Harrington and Kevin A. Hovel

The California spiny lobster is an ecologically and economically important species on southern California rocky reefs. We used manipulative experiments to determine how sheltering behaviors observed on naturally-occurring reefs influence the survival of subadult lobsters. Our study is the first to demonstrate the survival benefit of selecting shelters based on the size, and not just the presence, of other lobsters.

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Published online 27 August 2015
A comparison of the physiological responses, behaviour and biotransformation of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins in a surf-clam (Paphies donacina) and the green-lipped mussel (Perna canaliculus) 
Islay D. Marsden, Andrea M. Contreras, Lincoln MacKenzie and Murray H.G. Munro

Paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) occurs when people consume shellfish containing algal toxins known as saxitoxins. Both surf clams and green-lipped mussels readily accumulate these toxins. After 8 days of detoxification, toxin concentrations in the mussels had fallen, but in the clams, concentrations remained higher than was safe for human consumption. Mussels and clams can therefore be used to monitor the health risks associated with toxic algal blooms.

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Published online 31 July 2015
Patterned fen formation and development from the Great Sandy Region, south-east Queensland, Australia 
Patrick Moss, John Tibby, Felicity Shapland, Russell Fairfax, Philip Stewart, Cameron Barr, Lynda Petherick, Allen Gontz and Craig Sloss

This paper examines formation and development of the only known subtropical, Southern Hemisphere patterned fen wetlands from Fraser Island, Queensland, through the examination of swamp sediments and fossil pollen. The development of these globally important wetlands occurs within the broader Wire Rush wetlands, which formed from 12 000 years ago and are important refuge areas for the region’s unique animals.

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Published online 31 July 2015
A Ramsar-wetland in suburbia: wetland management in an urbanised, industrialised area 
S. J. Kermode, H. Heijnis, H. Wong, A. Zawadzki, P. Gadd and A. Permana

Towra Point Nature Reserve, in Sydney’s Botany Bay, is an internationally important wetland which is at risk due to human activities. This research aimed to check whether contamination from industry and urbanisation of the region have had negative impact, and found that levels of arsenic, lead and zinc are elevated on the southern side of the embayment. We propose that trigger levels outlined in water and sediment quality guidelines should be included in the Towra Point Plan of Management, so that elevated levels will initiate a management response from relevant authorities.

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    | Supplementary Material (51 KB)
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Published online 21 July 2015
Wandering wetlands: spatial patterns of historical channel and floodplain change in the Ramsar-listed Macquarie Marshes, Australia 
Timothy J. Ralph, Paul P. Hesse and Tsuyoshi Kobayashi

Natural channel change has caused parts of the Macquarie Marshes to be abandoned in the 20th Century and other wetland areas to form. Historical analysis shows that natural wetland changes lead to anachronistic conservation reserve boundaries where reserves include only a small portion of the floodplain. Adaptive management is required to recognise the natural dynamics of floodplain wetlands within static conservation reserve systems.

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    | Supplementary Material (18 KB)
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blank image Marine and Freshwater Research
Volume 67 Number 5 2016

 
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Novel method for shark age estimation using near infrared spectroscopy 
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C. L. Rigby , B. B. Wedding , S. Grauf and C. A. Simpfendorfer
pp. 537-545

Reliable age information is vital for effective shark fisheries management, yet traditional ageing has some limitations. Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) was investigated as an alternative approach using vertebrae from the great hammerhead and the spot-tail shark, the ages of which were validated to 10 years. NIRS successfully predicted their ages, is rapid and could be used to age large numbers of sharks quickly.

 
  
 

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Typhoon effects on phytoplankton responses in a semi-closed freshwater ecosystem 
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Chia-Ying Ko , Chao-Chen Lai , Tzong-Yueh Chen , Huang-Hsiung Hsu and Fuh-Kwo Shiah
pp. 546-555

The effects of typhoons upon freshwater ecosystem remain unclear. We analysed a 2-year time series of phytoplankton responses with typhoon events and found a significantly increased phytoplankton response both during the typhoon periods and during the non-typhoon periods occurring between two typhoons. Given that phytoplankton plays an important role in assimilating CO2 and contributes to the sinking of atmospheric CO2 to the bottom of the water column, typhoon-induced phytoplankton blooms may additionally serve to mitigate local warming under climate change.

 
  
 

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Feeding dynamics of the fiddler crab (Uca annulipes) in a non-tidal mangrove forest 
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N. Peer , N. A. F. Miranda , R. Perissinotto and J. L. Raw
pp. 556-565

Lack of tidal influence in estuarine habitats is predicted to increase globally but we do not yet understand the associated ecological consequences. Gut chlorophyll levels of a fiddler crab showed that feeding dynamics vary with season, time of day and between sexes in a non-tidal mangrove habitat. These results provide insight into the response of macrobenthos to environmental change.

 
  
 

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Spatio-temporal variability of the surf-zone fauna of two Ecuadorian sandy beaches 
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Jose R. Marin Jarrin , Sandra L. Miño Quezada , Luis E. Dominguez-Granda , Sonnia M. Guartatanga Argudo and Maria del Pilar Cornejó R. de Grunauer
pp. 566-577

Sandy beaches and their surf-zones are the most common coastal habitat and are inhabited by diverse fauna, including economically important species. The present study described the small swimming-area fauna of two Ecuadorian sandy beaches and found that their communities varied most strongly between beaches, and less so between seasons, potentially due to the influence of adjacent rivers and oceanic currents. Our results suggest that despite the environmental stability often portrayed for tropical environments, Ecuadorian surf-zone fauna are spatially and temporally variable.

 
    | Supplementary Material (231 KB)
 

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First data on the age, growth and sexual maturity of the piked spurdog, Squalus megalops (Chondrichthyes: Squalidae), in the Gulf of Gabès (central Mediterranean Sea) 
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Sondes Marouani , Hasna Kadri and Mohamed Nejmeddine Bradai
pp. 578-585

The occurrence of Squalus megalops in the Gulf of Gabès (central Mediterranean Sea) is recently confirmed; life cycle of this shark is crucial for its conservation. Thus, growth, longevity, natural mortality and size and age at maturity of, are reported. The data approve that S. megalops have a k-strategy in its life history.

 
  
 

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Reproduction of French angelfish Pomacanthus paru (Teleostei: Pomacanthidae) and implications for management of the ornamental fish trade in Brazil 
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Caroline Vieira Feitosa , Simone Marques , Maria Elisabeth de Araújo and Beatrice Padovani Ferreira
pp. 586-593

Pomacanthus paru is one of the most exported species in the Brazilian aquarium trade and is caught by traps as bycatch. This species was gonochoristic, exhibited size dimorphism and the size at maturity of females was 23.30 cm. At the spawning stage, females may be more vulnerable to trap fishing. Management measures should consider implementing trap-free areas in spawning grounds.

 
  
 

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Population dynamics of a high-latitude coral Alveopora japonica Eguchi from Jeju Island, off the southern coast of Korea 
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Christophe Vieira , Shashank Keshavmurthy , Se-Jong Ju , Kiseong Hyeong , Inah Seo , Chang-Keun Kang , Hyun-Ki Hong , Chaolun Allen Chen and Kwang-Sik Choi
pp. 594-604

The coral Alveopora japonica in Jeju Island, South Korea, has increased in number over past decades and has encroached upon the macroalgal substrates affecting both the presence of macroalgae and abalone populations, which feed on macroalgae. To assess the dynamics the population increase, population-ecology studies of this coral was conducted from two locations at north and south of the Island. Population-age and -size structures at both sites reflected a healthy status and indicated a local stability, with a stationary size structure allowing population maintenance over time. The present study provided data to develop population-dynamics models to predict the potential outcomes of A. japonica populations to alternative management scenarios in Jeju Island.

 
    | Supplementary Material (241 KB)
 

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Olfactory responses of coral-reef fishes to coral degradation and crown-of-thorns (Acanthaster planci) 
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Amy G. Coppock , Naomi M. Gardiner and Geoffrey P. Jones
pp. 605-611

Coral degradation is a major threat toward coral-reef ecosystems, a factor that is likely to be problematic for species that exhibit specific habitat preferences. The ability of juvenile coral reef fishes to identify poor habitats, namely degraded coral and the presence of crown-of-thorns starfish, through smell was investigated. Whereas the crown-of-thorns elicited a limited response (unless feeding), the smell of degraded coral was actively avoided, such reactions are important for predicting ecosystem alterations resulting from environmental change.

 
  
 

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Comparison of in situ and satellite sea surface-temperature data from South Australia and Tasmania: how reliable are satellite data as a proxy for coastal temperatures in temperate southern Australia? 
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B. Stobart , S. Mayfield , C. Mundy , A. J. Hobday and J. R. Hartog
pp. 612-625

Studies of marine life increasingly use sea-surface temperature from satellites assuming it represents conditions in the water column, yet this assumption has rarely been tested. We compared satellite and water column temperatures spanning a wide geographic range across southern Australia and found they were generally similar, but can differ considerably depending on local conditions. Therefore, although satellite temperatures should be adequate for many broad-scale studies, they should be validated prior to using in finer-scale studies.

 
  
 

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Influence of oceanic fronts on mesozooplankton abundance and grazing during spring in the south-western Atlantic 
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Rubens M. Lopes , Catarina R. Marcolin and Frederico P. Brandini
pp. 626-635

Oceanic fronts are often considered as sites of enhanced biological production, influencing fish stocks and the global carbon cycle. We evaluated zooplankton biomass and grazing across a latitudinal gradient in the South-west Atlantic Ocean, and found that subtropical and subpolar frontal areas have higher zooplankton activity than surrounding waters. Our results suggest that these frontal systems have a significant effect on zooplankton, ultimately affecting deep-water carbon sequestration.

 
  
 

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Demersal chondrichthyans in the western Mediterranean: assemblages and biological parameters of their main species 
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Sergio Ramírez-Amaro , Francesc Ordines , Bàrbara Terrasa , Antonio Esteban , Cristina García , Beatriz Guijarro and Enric Massutí
pp. 636-652

Demersal chondrichthyan assemblages were compared in four geographical subareas established by the General Fisheries Commission for the Mediterranean in the western Mediterranean. Present study revealed two assemblages related to depth, with similar bathymetric ranges in all subareas, namely continental shelf and slope. However diversity, abundance and biomass values were different between subareas which reflects the effects of the distinct fishing and oceanographic parameters.

 
  
 

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Determining optimal sampling strategies for monitoring threatened endemic macro-invertebrates in Australia 
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R. A. Rossini , R. J. Fensham and G. H. Walter
pp. 653-665

Australian artesian springs are hot spots for aquatic diversity but data deficiency hinders conservation efforts. This study compared existing study methods for sampling the diversity and abundance of macro-invertebrates in springs and found that diversity can be sampled rapidly and with little bias, yet abundance measures are sensitive to method. This means we can pool existing disparate data sources pertaining to diversity at a national scale, and offer an optimised strategy for all taxa encountered.

 
    | Supplementary Material (173 KB)
 

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The effects of growth anomaly on susceptibility of Montipora capitata to turf algal overgrowth 
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D. C. Claar and M. Takabayashi
pp. 666-670

Disease affects not only the biological function of coral, but it may also affect the ability of corals to compete with other species in their environment. This study evaluated the effect of growth anomalies (GAs) on the susceptibility of the coral M. capitata to algal overgrowth. The relationship between GA and algal overgrowth was weak, implying that other factors (e.g. environmental conditions) are driving this interaction.

 
  
 

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Morphologically similar, coexisting hard corals (Porites lobata and P. solida) display similar trophic isotopic ratios across reefs and depths 
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Jeremiah G. Plass-Johnson , Christopher D. McQuaid and Jaclyn M. Hill
pp. 671-676

Few studies have accounted for morphology when comparing interspecific differences in the isotopic values of corals. In this study we show that the δ13C and δ15N values of Porites lobata and P. solida have few differences across reefs and depths. This suggests that resource partitioning among corals is mostly driven by resource acquisition, rather than being inherently species-specific.

 
    | Supplementary Material (368 KB)
 

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Identification of human-made physical barriers to fish passage in the Wet Tropics region, Australia 
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Frederieke J. Kroon and Seonaid Phillips
pp. 677-681

Physical barriers in streams and rivers can deny fish access to habitat and food beyond these structures. This study identified a total of 3748 bridges, culverts and causeways in Australia’s Wet Tropics region that could potentially be barriers to fish passage. This inventory provides a first step in the prioritisation of potential barriers for removal and remediation to improve native fish movement and fisheries production.

 
  
 

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These articles have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication. They are still in production and have not been edited, so may differ from the final published form.

    MF16075  Accepted 28 April 2016
    Understanding change in the ecological character of Ramsar wetlands: perspectives from a deeper time - synthesis
    Peter Gell, Max Finlayson, Nicholas Davidson
    Abstract


    MF15445  Accepted 25 April 2016
    Opening the floodgates to the recovery of nektonic assemblages in a temperate coastal wetland
    Craig Boys, Bruce Pease
    Abstract


    MF15284  Accepted 25 April 2016
    MITIGATING THE EFFECTS OF BARRIERS TO FRESHWATER FISH MIGRATIONS: THE AUSTRALIAN EXPERIENCE
    John Harris, Richard Kingsford, William Peirson, Lee Baumgartner
    Abstract


    MF16026  Accepted 20 April 2016
    Bioaccumulation, oxidative stress and cellular damage in the intertidal gastropod, Bembicium nanum, exposed to a metal contamination gradient.
    Rodney Ubrihien, Anne Taylor, Bill Maher
    Abstract


    MF16092  Accepted 19 April 2016
    Understanding change in the ecological character of Wetlands
    Max Finlayson, Peter Gell
    Abstract


    MF16143  Accepted 20 April 2016
    Fish Otoliths as indicators in ecosystem based management: results of the 5th International Otolith Symposium (IOS2014)
    Audrey Geffen, Beatriz Morales-Nin, Bronwyn Gillanders
    Abstract


    MF15325  Accepted 19 April 2016
    Nocturnal sampling reveals usage patterns of intertidal marsh and sub-tidal creeks by penaeid shrimp and other nekton in south-eastern Australia
    Alistair Becker, Matthew Taylor
    Abstract


    MF16049  Accepted 18 April 2016
    Assessing sea level rise risks to coastal floodplains in the Kakadu Region, Northern Australia, using a tidally-driven hydrodynamic model
    Peter Bayliss, Kate Saunders, Leo Dutra, Lizandra Melo, James Hilton, Mahesh Prakash, Fletcher Woolard
    Abstract


    MF16010  Accepted 18 April 2016
    Persistence, loss and appearance of bacteria upstream and downstream
    Lisa Dann, Renee Smith, Thomas Jeffries, Jody McKerral, Peter Fairweather, Rod Oliver, James Mitchell
    Abstract


    MF15304  Accepted 13 April 2016
    Carrion consumption and its importance in a freshwater trophic generalist: the invasive apple snail Pomacea canaliculata
    Lucía Saveanu, Enzo Manara, Pablo Martín
    Abstract


    MF16114  Accepted 11 April 2016
    Is the Kuroshio Current a strong barrier for the dispersal of the gizzard shad Konosirus punctatus in the East China Sea?
    Na Song, Tianxiang Gao, Yiping Ying, Takashi Yanagimoto, Zhiqiang Han
    Abstract


    MF16029  Accepted 12 April 2016
    First report of Aphanizomenon favaloroi occurrence in Europe associated with saxitoxins and a massive fish kill in Lake Vistonis, Greece
    Maria Moustaka-Gouni, Anastasia Hiskia, Savvas Genitsaris, Matina Katsiapi, Korina Manolidi, Sevasti-Kiriaki Zervou, Christophoros Christophoridis, Theodoros Triantis, Triantafyllos Kaloudis, Sotiris Orfanidis
    Abstract


    MF15371  Accepted 12 April 2016
    Scale dependent lateral exchanges of organic carbon in a dryland river during a high flow experiment
    Alistar Robertson, Adrienne Burns, Terry Hillman
    Abstract


    MF15134  Accepted 08 April 2016
    Susceptibility of coral assemblages to successive bleaching events at Moorea, French Polynesia
    Andrew Carroll, Peter Harrison, Mehdi Adjeroud
    Abstract


    MF15468  Accepted 31 March 2016
    A comparison of temperature regimes in dry season waterholes in the Flinders and Gilbert catchments in northern Australia.
    Jim Wallace, Nathan Waltham, Damien Burrows
    Abstract


    MF16081  Accepted 31 March 2016
    Understanding change in the ecological character of internationally important wetlands: Editorial
    Nicholas Davidson
    Abstract


    MF16062  Accepted 30 March 2016
    Comparable cross-taxa risk perception via chemical cues in marine and freshwater crustaceans
    Rohan Brooker, Danielle Dixson
    Abstract


    MF16024  Accepted 22 March 2016
    Abundance patterns at the invasion front: The case of Siganus luridus in Linosa (Sicily-Strait, Central Mediterranean Sea)
    Ernesto Azzuro, Giulio Franzitta, Marco Milazzo, Michel Bariche, Emanuela Fanelli
    Abstract


    MF15162  Accepted 21 March 2016
    The influence of small changes in riparian forest complexity on aquatic insect bioindicators in Brazilian subtropical streams
    Ana Siegloch, Rafael Schmitt, Marcia Spies, Mauricio Petrucio, Malva Hernández
    Abstract


    MF15391  Accepted 19 March 2016
    Potential of submerged macrophytes to support food webs in lowland agricultural streams
    Robyn Paice, Jane Chambers, Belinda Robson
    Abstract


    MF15068  Accepted 18 March 2016
    Common carp disrupt ecosystem structure and function through middle-out effects
    Mark Kaemingk, Jeffrey Jolley, Craig Paukert, David Willis, Kjetil Henderson, Richard Holland, Greg Wanner, Mark Lindvall
    Abstract


    MF15345  Accepted 16 March 2016
    Spatio-temporal variation among demersal ichthyofauna in a subtropical estuary bordering World Heritage Listed and marine protected areas: implications for resource management
    Fernanda Possatto, Matt Broadhurst, Charles Gray, Henry Spach, Marcelo Lamour
    Abstract


    MF15206  Accepted 14 March 2016
    Effect of temperature and ration on the otolith to somatic size relationship in juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha): A test of the direct proportionality assumption
    David Stormer, Francis Juanes
    Abstract


    MF15207  Accepted 10 March 2016
    Does the relative value of submerged aquatic vegetation for penaeid shrimps vary with proximity to a tidal inlet? Preliminary evidence from a subtropical coastal lagoon
    Zeferino Blanco-Martínez, Roberto Pérez-Castañeda
    Abstract


    MF15183  Accepted 09 March 2016
    The effect of survey method on detection probabilities of frogs and tadpoles in large wetland complexes
    Skye Wassens, Andrew Hall, Jennifer Spencer
    Abstract


    MF16005  Accepted 09 March 2016
    Occurrence of juvenile bull sharks (Carcharhinus leucas) in the Navua River in Fiji
    Diego Cardeñosa, Kerstin Glaus, Juerg Brunnschweiler
    Abstract


    MF15336  Accepted 09 March 2016
    Eight river principles for navigating the science-policy interface
    Martin Thoms, Melissa Parsons, Joe Flotemersch
    Abstract


    MF15253  Accepted 08 March 2016
    Aggregations and reproductive events of the narrownose smooth-hound shark, Mustelus schmitti, in relation to temperature and depth in coastal waters of the southwestern Atlantic Ocean (38-42° S)
    Mariano Elisio, Jorge Colonello, Federico Cortés, Andres Jaureguizar, Gustavo Somoza, Gustavo Macchi
    Abstract


    MF15249  Accepted 08 March 2016
    Seasonal and diel effects on acoustic fish biomass estimates: Application to a shallow reservoir with untargeted common carp (Cyprinus carpio)
    Imed Djemali, Jean Guillard, Daniel L. Yule
    Abstract


    MF15473  Accepted 03 March 2016
    Evaluating the effectiveness of two tagging devices in the sea cucumber Holothuria (Halodeima) grisea
    Ruber Rodríguez-Barreras, Julián López Morell, Alberto Sabat
    Abstract


    MF15419  Accepted 04 March 2016
    Socio-ecological aspects of sustaining Ramsar wetlands in three biodiverse developing countries
    Jasmyn Lynch, Elikana Kalumanga, Guillermo Ospina
    Abstract


    MF15451  Accepted 02 March 2016
    Sedimentation in dryland river waterholes: a threat to aquatic refugia?
    Michael Reid, Martin Thoms, Kathryn Fitzsimmons, Stephen Chilcott
    Abstract


    MF15365  Accepted 03 March 2016
    Carbon sources for aquatic food webs of riverine and lacustrine tropical waterholes with variable groundwater influence.
    Neil Pettit, Danielle Warfe, Paul Close, Bradley Pusey, Rebecca Dobbs, Christy Davies, Dominic Valdez, Peter Davies
    Abstract


    MF15359  Accepted 29 February 2016
    Regionalization of freshwater fish assemblages in the Murray-Darling Basin, Australia
    Serena Hamilton, Carmel Pollino, Keith Walker
    Abstract


    MF15160  Accepted 29 February 2016
    The effects of altered flow and bed sediment on macroinvertebrates in stream mesocosms
    Ivor Growns, John Murphy, Iwan Jones
    Abstract


    MF15329  Accepted 28 February 2016
    THE IMPERATIVE NEED FOR NATIONALLY COORDINATED BIOASSESSMENT OF RIVERS AND STREAMS
    Susan Nichols, Leon Barmuta, Bruce Chessman, Peter Davies, Fiona Dyer, Evan Harrison, Charles Hawkins, Iwan Jones, Ben Kefford, Simon Linke, Richard Marchant, Leon Metzeling, Katie Moon, Ralph Ogden, Michael Peat, Trefor Reynoldson, Ross Thompson
    Abstract


    MF15291  Accepted 25 February 2016
    NUTRIENT ADDITION EFFECTS, RECOVERY THEREAFTER, AND THE ROLE OF MACROPHYTES IN NUTRIENT DYNAMICS OF A MEDITERRANEAN SHALLOW LAKE: A MESOCOSM EXPERIMENT
    Carmen Ferriol, María Rosa Miracle, Eduardo Vicente
    Abstract


    MF15350  Accepted 24 February 2016
    Multiple stressors associated with acid sulfate soil effluent influence mud crab Scylla serrata predation on Sydney rock oysters Saccostrea glomerata
    Cassandra N. Glaspie, Rochelle D. Seitz
    Abstract


    MF15408  Accepted 22 February 2016
    Alpha and beta diversity of freshwater meiofauna at different spatial scales in a Neotropical lotic system
    Thiago Araujo, Hélio Checon, Andre Rinaldo Garraffoni
    Abstract


    MF15372  Accepted 17 February 2016
    Lotic bacterioplankton and phytoplankton community changes under dissolved organic carbon amendment: evidence for competition for nutrients
    Richard Carney, Justin Seymour, Douglas Westhorpe, Simon Mitrovic
    Abstract


    MF15326  Accepted 17 February 2016
    Difference in the trophic structure of fish communities between artificial and natural habitats on a tropical estuary
    Pedro Pereira, Marcus Santos, Daniel Lippi, Pedro Silva, Breno Barros
    Abstract


    MF15280  Accepted 17 February 2016
    DOC and DON concentrations and exports upstream and downstream of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metropolis, Texas, USA
    Jacqueline Aitkenhead-Peterson, Meredith Steele
    Abstract


    MF15297  Accepted 16 February 2016
    Zooplankton responses to freshwater inflows and organic matter pulses in a wave-dominated estuary
    James Hitchcock, Simon Mitrovic, Wade Hadwen, Ivor Growns, Ann-Marie Rohlfs
    Abstract


    MF15154  Accepted 15 February 2016
    Structure, dynamics and stability of a Mediterranean river food web
    Ignacio Peralta-Maraver, Manuel Jesús López-Rodríguez, José Manuel Tierno de Figueroa
    Abstract


    MF15323  Accepted 14 February 2016
    ZN REQUIREMENT FOR TWO PHYTOPLANKTON STRAINS OF THE TASMAN SEA
    Marie Sinoir, Andrew Bowie, Mathieu Mongin, Edward Butler, Christel Hassler
    Abstract


    MF15399  Accepted 13 February 2016
    Slow life history traits of a neritic predator, the bronze whaler (Carcharhinus brachyurus)
    Michael Drew, Charlie Huveneers, Paul Rogers
    Abstract


    MF14322  Accepted 09 February 2016
    Basal carbon sources and planktonic food web in a tropical lake: an isotopic approach
    Paula Reis, Luiz Martinelli, Francisco Barbosa
    Abstract


    MF15427  Accepted 09 February 2016
    Contrasting population structures of three Pristis sawfishes with different patterns of habitat use
    Nicole M Phillips, Jennifer Chaplin, Stirling Peverell, David Morgan
    Abstract


    MF15165  Accepted 07 February 2016
    Efficacy of Baited Remote Underwater Video Systems and bait type in the cool-temperature zone for monitoring no take marine reserves
    Aidan Walsh, Neville Barrett, Nicole Hill
    Abstract


    MF15434  Accepted 04 February 2016
    The distribution, significance and vulnerability of Australian rhodolith beds: a review
    Adela Harvey, Robert Harvey, Eve Merton
    Abstract


    MF15376  Accepted 25 January 2016
    25-year longevity for European hake (Merluccius merluccius) from novel use of bomb radiocarbon dating in the Mediterranean Sea
    Sergio Vitale, Allen Andrews, Pietro Rizzo, Salvatore Gancitano, Fabio Fiorentino
    Abstract


    MF15407  Accepted 11 November 2015
    The urgent global need to understand port and harbour ecosystems
    Emma Johnston, Luke Hedge, Mariana Mayer Pinto
    Abstract


52


The Most Read ranking is based on the number of downloads from the CSIRO PUBLISHING website of articles published in the previous 12 months. Usage statistics are updated daily.

Rank Paper Details
1. Published 5 November 2015
Long-term ecological trends of flow-dependent ecosystems in a major regulated river basin

Matthew J. Colloff, Peter Caley, Neil Saintilan, Carmel A. Pollino and Neville D. Crossman

2. Using environmental (e)DNA sequencing for aquatic biodiversity surveys: a beginner’s guide

Jennifer L. A. Shaw, Laura Weyrich and Alan Cooper

3. Published 29 July 2015
Marine plastic pollution: using community science to address a global problem

Paul. E. Duckett and Vincenzo Repaci

4. Published 16 December 2015
The 'Great Southern Reef': social, ecological and economic value of Australia's neglected kelp forests

Scott Bennett, Thomas Wernberg, Sean D. Connell, Alistair J. Hobday, Craig R. Johnson and Elvira S. Poloczanska

5. Published 24 February 2016
Human impacts on connectivity in marine and freshwater ecosystems assessed using graph theory: a review

Megan I. Saunders, Christopher J. Brown, Melissa M. Foley, Catherine M. Febria, Rebecca Albright, Molly G. Mehling, Maria T. Kavanaugh and Dana D. Burfeind

6. Published 24 November 2015
Sydney Harbour: a review of anthropogenic impacts on the biodiversity and ecosystem function of one of the world

M. Mayer-Pinto, E. L. Johnston, P. A. Hutchings, E. M. Marzinelli, S. T. Ahyong, G. Birch, D. J. Booth, R. G. Creese, M. A. Doblin, W. Figueira, P. E. Gribben, T. Pritchard, M. Roughan, P. D. Steinberg and L. H. Hedge

7. Published 22 May 2015
Age and size compositions, habitats, growth and reproductive characteristics of a terapontid (Pelates octolineatus) in coastal waters

Lauren Veale, Peter Coulson, Norman Hall, Alex Hesp and Ian C. Potter

8. Published 24 March 2016
Big data opportunities and challenges for assessing multiple stressors across scales in aquatic ecosystems

K. A. Dafforn, E. L. Johnston, A. Ferguson, C.L. Humphrey, W. Monk, S. J. Nichols, S. L. Simpson, M. G. Tulbure and D. J. Baird

9. Published 29 June 2015
Geographic variation in long-term trajectories of change in coral recruitment: a global-to-local perspective

P. J. Edmunds, R. Steneck, R. Albright, R. C. Carpenter, A. P. Y. Chui, T.-Y. Fan, S. Harii, H. Kitano, H. Kurihara, L. Legendre, S. Mitarai, S. Muko, Y. Nozawa, J. Padilla-Gamino, N. N. Price, K. Sakai, G. Suzuki, M. J. H. van Oppen, A. Yarid and R. D. Gates

10. Published 22 May 2015
Repairing Australia's estuaries for improved fisheries production – what benefits, at what cost?

Colin Creighton, Paul I. Boon, Justin D. Brookes and Marcus Sheaves

11. Published 24 February 2016
DNA barcoding Australian macroinvertebrates for monitoring programs: benefits and current short comings

Michael Shackleton and Gavin N. Rees

12. Published 16 December 2015
How good are we at assessing the impact of ocean acidification in coastal systems? Limitations, omissions and strengths of commonly used experimental approaches with special emphasis on the neglected role of fluctuations

M. Wahl, V. Saderne and Y. Sawall

13. Published 28 September 2015
River metabolism and carbon dynamics in response to flooding in a lowland river

Robert A. Cook, Ben Gawne, Rochelle Petrie, Darren S. Baldwin, Gavin N. Rees, Daryl L. Nielsen and Nathan S. P. Ning

14. Published 24 November 2015
Sydney Harbour: what we do and do not know about a highly diverse estuary

E. L. Johnston, M. Mayer-Pinto, P. A. Hutchings, E. M. Marzinelli, S. T. Ahyong, G. Birch, D. J. Booth, R. G. Creese, M. A. Doblin, W. Figueira, P. E. Gribben, T. Pritchard, M. Roughan, P. D. Steinberg and L. H. Hedge

15. Published 29 July 2015
Evidence for a broad-scale decline in giant Australian cuttlefish (Sepia apama) abundance from non-targeted survey data

Thomas A. A. Prowse, Bronwyn M. Gillanders, Barry W. Brook, Anthony J. Fowler, Karina C. Hall, Michael A. Steer, Camille Mellin, N. Clisby, Jason E. Tanner, Tim M. Ward and Damien A. Fordham

16. Published 29 June 2015
Does the telemetry technology matter? Comparing estimates of aquatic animal space-use generated from GPS-based and passive acoustic tracking

Ross G. Dwyer, Hamish A. Campbell, Terri R. Irwin and Craig E. Franklin

17. Published 16 December 2015
The value of a broad temporal and spatial perspective in understanding dynamics of kelp forest ecosystems

Daniel C. Reed, Andrew R. Rassweiler, Robert J. Miller, Henry M. Page and Sally J. Holbrook

18. Published 24 March 2016
New diagnostics for multiply stressed marine and freshwater ecosystems: integrating models, ecoinformatics and big data

D. J. Baird, P. J. Van den Brink, A. A. Chariton, K. A. Dafforn and E. L. Johnston

19. Published 22 May 2015
Movement patterns and habitat use of juvenile mangrove whiprays (Himantura granulata)

Lauren E. Davy, Colin A. Simpfendorfer and Michelle R. Heupel

20. Published 29 June 2015
Development of habitat prediction models to reduce by-catch of sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus) within the purse-seine fishery in the eastern Pacific Ocean

Raul O. Martinez-Rincon, Sofia Ortega-Garcia, Juan G. Vaca-Rodriguez and Shane P. Griffiths


      
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