Australian Health Review Australian Health Review Society
Journal of the Australian Healthcare & Hospitals Association
RESEARCH ARTICLE

How do we capture the emergency nurse practitioners’ contribution to value in health service delivery?

Natasha Jennings A E , Matthew Lutze B , Stuart Clifford C and Michael Maw D
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Emergency and Trauma Centre, The Alfred Hospital, Commercial Road, Prahran, Vic. 3004, Australia.

B St George Hospital, Gray Street, Kogarah, NSW 2217, Australia. Email: Matthew.Lutze@health.nsw.gov.au

C Mudgee Health Service, Lewis Street, Mudgee, NSW 2850, Australia. Email: Stuart.Clifford@health.nsw.gov.au

D The MORDUN Group, PO Box 3253, Mornington, Vic. 3931, Australia. Email: michael.maw@themordungroup.com

E Corresponding author. Email: N.Jennings@alfred.org.au

Australian Health Review 41(1) 89-90 https://doi.org/10.1071/AH15155
Submitted: 5 May 2015  Accepted: 8 April 2016   Published: 26 May 2016

Abstract

The emergency nurse practitioner is now a well established and respected member of the healthcare team. Evaluation of the role has focused on patient safety, effectiveness and quality of care outcomes. Comparisons of the role continue to focus on cost, with findings based on incomplete and almost impossible to define, recognition of contribution to service delivery by paralleled practitioners. Currently there is no clear definition as to how nurse practitioners contribute to value in health service delivery. Robust and rigorous research needs to be commissioned taking into consideration the unique hybrid nature of the emergency nurse practitioner role and focusing on the value they contribute to health care delivery.


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