Australian Health Review Australian Health Review Society
Journal of the Australian Healthcare & Hospitals Association
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Creating a new investment pool for innovative health systems research

Tracey-Lea Laba A B , Anushka Patel A and Stephen Jan A
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A The George Institute for Global Health, University of Sydney, PO Box M201 Missenden Road, Camperdown, NSW 2050, Australia. Email: patel@georgeinstitute.org.au; sjan@georgeinstitute.org.au

B Corresponding author. Email: tlaba@georgeinstitute.org.au

Australian Health Review 41(2) 173-175 https://doi.org/10.1071/AH15230
Submitted: 10 December 2015  Accepted: 22 March 2016   Published: 14 October 2016

Abstract

Recent trends in health research funding towards ‘safe bets’ is discouraging investment into the development of health systems interventions and choking off a vital area of policy-relevant research. This paper argues that to encourage investment into innovative and perceivably riskier health systems research, researchers need to create more attractive business cases by exploring alternative approaches to the design and evaluation of health system interventions. At the same time, the creation of dedicated funding opportunities to support this work, as well as for relevant early career researchers, is needed.


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