Australian Health Review Australian Health Review Society
Journal of the Australian Healthcare & Hospitals Association
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Management of patients brought in by ambulance to the emergency department: role of the Advanced Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist

Rita Kinsella A D , Tom Collins A , Bridget Shaw A , James Sayer B , Belinda Cary A , Andrew Walby A and Sallie Cowan A C
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A St Vincent’s Hospital, Physiotherapy Department, Victoria Parade, Fitzroy, Vic. 3065, Australia. Email: Tom.Collins@svha.org.au; Bridget.Shaw@svha.org.au; Belinda.Cary@svha.org.au; Andrew.Walby@svha.org.au

B The Alfred Hospital, PO Box 315, Prahran, Vic. 3181, Australia. Email: j.sayer@alfred.org.au

C The School of Physiotherapy, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010, Australia. Email: s.cowan@unimelb.edu.au

D Corresponding author. Email: Rita.Kinsella@svha.org.au

Australian Health Review - https://doi.org/10.1071/AH16094
Submitted: 25 April 2016  Accepted: 9 March 2017   Published online: 9 May 2017

Abstract

Objective The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of the Advanced Musculoskeletal Physiotherapist (AMP) in managing patients brought in by ambulance to the emergency department (ED).

Methods This study was a dual-centre observational study. Patients brought in by ambulance to two Melbourne hospitals over a 12-month period and seen by an AMP were compared with a matched group seen by other ED staff. Primary outcome measures were wait time and length of stay (LOS) in the ED.

Results Data from 1441 patients within the Australasian Triage Scale (ATS) Categories 3–5 with musculoskeletal complaints were included in the analysis. Subgroup analysis of 825 patients aged ≤65 years demonstrated that for Category 4 (semi-urgent) patients, the median wait time to see the AMP was 9.5 min (interquartile range (IQR) 3.25–18.00 min) compared with 25 min (IQR 10.00–56.00 min) to see other ED staff (P ≤ 0.05). LOS analysis was undertaken on patients discharged home and demonstrated that there was a 1.20 greater probability (95% confidence interval 1.07–1.35) that ATS Category 4 patients managed by the AMP were discharged within the 4-hour public hospital target compared with patients managed by other ED staff: 87.04% (94/108) of patients managed by the AMPs met this standard compared with 72.35% (123/170) of patients managed by other ED staff (P = 0.002).

Conclusions Patients aged ≤65 years with musculoskeletal complaints brought in by ambulance to the ED and triaged to ATS Category 4 are likely to wait less time to be seen and are discharged home more quickly when managed by an AMP. This study has added to the evidence that AMPs improve patient flow in the ED, freeing up time for other ED staff to see higher-acuity, more complex patients.

What is known about the topic? There is a growing body of evidence establishing that AMPs improve the flow of patients presenting with musculoskeletal conditions to the ED through reduced wait times and LOS and, at the same time, providing good-quality care and enhanced patient satisfaction.

What does this paper add? Within their primary contact capacity, AMPs also manage patients who are brought in by ambulance presenting with musculoskeletal conditions. To the authors’ knowledge, there is currently no available literature documenting the performance of AMPs in the management of this cohort of patients.

What are the implications for practitioners? This study has added to the body of evidence that AMPs improve patient flow in the ED and illustrates that AMPs, by seeing patients brought in by ambulance, are able to have a positive impact on the pressures increasingly facing the Victorian Ambulance Service and emergency hospital care.


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