Australian Health Review Australian Health Review Society
Journal of the Australian Healthcare & Hospitals Association
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Human dimension of health service management

Jo. M. Martins A , Godfrey Isouard B C E and Brenda Freshman D
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A 103 Cabarita Road, Avalon, NSW 2107, Australia. Email: jmartins@tpg.com.au

B University of New of New England, 1 Elm Avenue, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia.

C Australasian College of Health Service Management (ACHSM), 9/5 Devlin Street, Ryde, NSW 2112, Australia.

D Department of Health Care Administration, Ukleja Center for Ethical Leadership, California State University, Long Beach CA, USA. Email: Brenda.Freshman@csulb.edu

E Corresponding author. Email: gisouard@une.edu.au

Australian Health Review - https://doi.org/10.1071/AH17063
Submitted: 6 April 2017  Accepted: 17 July 2017   Published online: 13 November 2017

Abstract

This article identifies three relevant and valid constructs that are associated with personal and organisational performance that can be used in the training of current and future health service managers: personal engagement at work, emotional intelligence and conflict resolution. A review was undertaken of the literature in human resources management to identify key concepts that bind and strengthen the management of organisations. A curriculum content analysis was then performed of postgraduate health management courses in Australia to assess the extent of inclusion in these areas. Three concepts and practices of relevance to the human dimension of health management, namely personal engagement at work, emotional intelligence and conflict resolution, were found to: (1) have concept validity; (2) be associated with personal and organisational performance; and (3) be capable of being imparted by training. The analysis indicated that none of the competencies and/or skills identified has been given emphasis in postgraduate health management courses in Australia. Competence in the management of human relationships in health services has been given low priority in university postgraduate training in health management in Australia. The current situation poses challenges to all stakeholders of health services.


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