Australian Health Review Australian Health Review Society
Journal of the Australian Healthcare & Hospitals Association
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Turning attention to clinician engagement in Victoria

Christine Jorm A C , Robyn Hudson B and Euan Wallace AM B
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A The University of Sydney, Room 215, A27 Edward Ford Building, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

B Safer Care Victoria, 50 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne, Vic. 3000, Australia. Email: robyn.hudson@dhhs.vic.gov.au; euan.wallace@dhhs.vic.gov.au

C Corresponding author. Email: christine.jorm@sydney.edu.au

Australian Health Review - https://doi.org/10.1071/AH17100
Submitted: 11 April 2017  Accepted: 28 September 2017   Published online: 16 November 2017

Abstract

The engagement of clinicians with employing organisations and with the broader health system results in better safer care for patients. Concerns about the adequacy of clinician engagement in the state of Victoria led the Victorian Department of Health and Human Services to commission a scoping study. During this investigation more than 100 clinicians were spoken with and 1800 responded to surveys. The result was creation of a clear picture of what engagement and disengagement looked like at all levels – from the clinical microsystem to state health policy making. Multiple interventions are possible to enhance clinician engagement and thus the care of future patients. A framework was developed to guide future Victorian work with four elements: setting the agenda, informing, involving and empowering clinicians. Concepts of work or employee engagement that are used in other industries don’t directly translate to healthcare and thus the definition of engagement chosen for use centred on involvement. This was designed to encourage system managers to ensure clinicians are full participants in design, planning and evaluation and in all decisions that affect them and their patients.

Additional keywords: leadership, organisational culture, quality, safety.


References

[1]  Martin GP, Learmonth M. A critical account of the rise and spread of ‘leadership’: the case of UK healthcare. Soc Sci Med 2012; 74 281–8.
A critical account of the rise and spread of ‘leadership’: the case of UK healthcare.CrossRef |

[2]  Jorm C, Parker M. Medical leadership is the new black: or is it? Aust Health Rev 2015; 39 217–9.
Medical leadership is the new black: or is it?CrossRef |

[3]  McDonald R.. Leadership and leadership development in healthcare settings – a simplistic solution to complex problems? Int J Health Policy Manag 2014; 3 227–9.
Leadership and leadership development in healthcare settings – a simplistic solution to complex problems?CrossRef |

[4]  Dixon-Woods M, McNicol S, Martin G. Ten challenges in improving quality in healthcare: lessons from the Health Foundation’s programme evaluations and relevant literature. BMJ Qual Saf 2012; 21 876–84.
Ten challenges in improving quality in healthcare: lessons from the Health Foundation’s programme evaluations and relevant literature.CrossRef |

[5]  Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). Targeting zero. Supporting the Victorian hospital system to eliminate avoidable harm and strengthen quality of care. Report of the Review of Hospital Safety and Quality Assurance in Victoria. Melbourne: DHHS; 2016.

[6]  Jorm C. Clinical engagement – scoping paper. Melbourne: Victorian Department of Health and Human Services; 2017. Available at: https://www2.health.vic.gov.au/about/publications/policiesandguidelines/clinical-engagement-scoping-paper [verified 3 March 2017].

[7]  Guest D. Employee engagement: a sceptical analysis. Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance. 2014; 1 141–56.
Employee engagement: a sceptical analysis.CrossRef |

[8]  Bailey C, Madden A, Alfes K, Fletcher L. The meaning, antecedents and outcomes of employee engagement: A narrative synthesis. Int J Manag Rev 2017; 19 31–53.
The meaning, antecedents and outcomes of employee engagement: A narrative synthesis.CrossRef |

[9]  Purcell J. Disengaging from engagement. Hum Resour Manage J 2014; 24 241–54.
Disengaging from engagement.CrossRef |

[10]  Nahrgang JD, Morgeson FP, Hofmann DA. Safety at work: a meta-analytic investigation of the link between job demands, job resources, burnout, engagement, and safety outcomes. J Appl Psychol 2011; 96 71–94.
Safety at work: a meta-analytic investigation of the link between job demands, job resources, burnout, engagement, and safety outcomes.CrossRef |

[11]  MacLeod D, Clarke N. Engaging for success: enhancing performance through employee engagement: a report to governmen. London: Department for Business, Innovation and Skills; 2009.

[12]  West M, Dawson J. Employee engagement and NHS performance. London: The King’s Fund; 2012.

[13]  Dromey J. Meeting the challenge: successful employee engagement in the NHS. London: IPA. 2014. Available at: http://www.ipa-involve.com/resources/publications/meeting-the-challenge/ [verified 24 October 2017]

[14]  Jorm C. Reconstructing medical practice – engagement, professionalism and critical relationships in health care. Hampshire: Ashgate; 2012.

[15]  Batalden P, Davidoff F. What is “quality improvement” and how can it transform healthcare? Qual Saf Health Care 2007; 16 2–3.
What is “quality improvement” and how can it transform healthcare?CrossRef |

[16]  Bonias D, Leggat SG, Bartram T. Encouraging participation in health system reform: is clinical engagement a useful concept for policy and management? Aust Health Rev 2012; 36 378–83.
Encouraging participation in health system reform: is clinical engagement a useful concept for policy and management?CrossRef |

[17]  Rana S. High-involvement work practices and employee engagement. Hum Resour Dev Int 2015; 18 308–16.
High-involvement work practices and employee engagement.CrossRef |



Export Citation

View Altmetrics