Australian Mammalogy Australian Mammalogy Society
Journal of the Australian Mammal Society
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Home-range studies in a reintroduced brush-tailed rock-wallaby (Petrogale penicillata) population in the Grampians National Park, Victoria

Jenny Molyneux A B E , David A. Taggart A B , Anthony Corrigan C and Sean Frey D
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Department of Earth and Environmental Science, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia.

B Conservation Ark, Royal Zoological Society of South Australia, Frome Road, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia.

C Ecodiversity, ‘Kilara’, Yellowbox Road, The Angle, NSW 2620, Australia.

D Parks Canada, Riding Mountain National Park of Canada, Wasagaming, Manitoba R0J 2H0, Canada.

E Corresponding author. Email: jennifer.molyneux@adelaide.edu.au

Australian Mammalogy 33(2) 128-134 https://doi.org/10.1071/AM10039
Submitted: 29 October 2010  Accepted: 29 April 2011   Published: 12 September 2011

Abstract

In 2008, after 9 years of presumed local extinction, brush-tailed rock-wallabies (Petrogale penicillata) were reintroduced at Moora Moora Creek in the Grampians National Park, western Victoria. Since little is known about this species in Victoria, the reintroduction presented an important opportunity to gain information on the species’ ecology. Radio-tracking was undertaken and home range determined for three individuals released 11 months before this study and a further five individuals that were released at the commencement of the study in October 2009. Home-range size showed little variation amongst individuals, with a mean overall home range of 26 ha (±1.69, s.e.) and a mean core home range of 2.5 ha (±0.24, s.e.). Newly reintroduced individuals showed higher levels of association with wallabies from the same release and greater site fidelity when known conspecifics were close. Within 5 months of release, newly reintroduced animals showed home ranges similar in both size and distribution to those of animals released 11 months prior.

Additional keywords: activity patterns, macropodid, marsupial, radio-tracking, social organisation.


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