Australian Mammalogy Australian Mammalogy Society
Journal of the Australian Mammal Society
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Does the ‘extinct’ eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus) persist in Barrington Tops, New South Wales?

Greta J. Frankham A , Sean Thompson B , Sandy Ingleby A , Todd Soderquist C and Mark D. B. Eldridge A D
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Australian Museum Research Institute, Australian Museum, 1 William Street, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia.

B NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service, Office of Environment and Heritage, Gloucester, NSW 2422, Australia.

C Office of Environment and Heritage, North West Region, Armidale, NSW 2350, Australia.

D Corresponding author. Email: mark.eldridge@austmus.gov.au

Australian Mammalogy 39(2) 243-247 https://doi.org/10.1071/AM16029
Submitted: 20 June 2016  Accepted: 22 October 2016   Published: 25 November 2016

Abstract

The eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus) is believed to be extinct on the Australian mainland, with the last confirmed record in 1963. Recently an eastern quoll specimen was located that had been found in northern Barrington Tops National Park (200 km north of Sydney) in 1989. Partial sequences (~200 bp) of the mitochondrial DNA gene Cytochrome b were obtained from the Barrington Tops specimen and compared with sequences from known mainland and Tasmanian eastern quolls. The genetic data, while limited, are most consistent with the Barrington Tops specimen being derived from the ‘extinct’ mainland eastern quoll population. This suggests that eastern quolls survived for decades longer on the Australian mainland than previously thought and raises the possibility that they may still persist in remote areas such as Barrington Tops.

Additional keywords: Australia, marsupial, mitochondrial DNA, dasyurid, extinction.


References

Baker, A. M. (2015). Family Dasyuridae (carnivorous marsupials). In ‘Handbook of the Mammals of the World. Volume 5. Marsupials and Monotremes’. (Eds D. E. Wilson and R. A. Mittermeier.) pp. 232–348. (Lynx Edicions: Barcelona.)

Cardoso, M., Mooney, N., Eldridge, M. D. B., Firestone, K. B., and Sherwin, W. B. (2014). Genetic monitoring reveals significant population structure in eastern quolls – implications for the conservation of a threatened carnivorous marsupial. Australian Mammalogy 36, 169–177.

Dickman, C. R., Lunney, D., and Matthews, A. (2001). Ecological attributes and conservation of dasyurid marsupials in New South Wales. Pacific Conservation Biology 7, 124–133.
Ecological attributes and conservation of dasyurid marsupials in New South Wales.CrossRef |

Eldridge, M. D. B., and Herbert, C. A. (2015). Terrestrial mammal diversity, conservation and management in Australia. In ‘Austral Ark: The State of Wildlife in Australia and New Zealand’. (Eds A. Stow, N. Maclean and G. I. Holwell.) pp. 298–319. (Cambridge University Press: Cambridge.)

Fancourt, B. A. (2016). Diagnosing species decline: a contextual review of threats, causes and future directions for management and conservation of the eastern quoll. Wildlife Research 43, 197–211.
Diagnosing species decline: a contextual review of threats, causes and future directions for management and conservation of the eastern quoll.CrossRef |

Fancourt, B. A., Hawkins, C. E., and Nicol, S. C. (2013). Evidence of rapid population decline of the eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus) in Tasmania. Australian Mammalogy 35, 195–205.
Evidence of rapid population decline of the eastern quoll (Dasyurus viverrinus) in Tasmania.CrossRef |

Ford, F. (2014). ‘John Gould’s Extinct and Endangered Mammals of Australia.’ (National Library of Australia: Canberra.)

Jones, M. (2008). Eastern quoll Dasyurus viverrinus. In ‘The Mammals of Australia’. 3rd edn. (Eds S. Van Dyck and R. Strahan.) pp. 62–64. (New Holland: Sydney.)

Kennedy, M. (Ed.) (1992). ‘Australasian Marsupials and Monotremes: An Action Plan for their Conservation.’ (IUCN: Gland, Switzerland.)

Maxwell, S., Burbidge, A. A., and Morris, K. (Eds) (1996). ‘The 1996 Action Plan for Australian Marsupials and Monotremes.’ (Wildlife Australia: Canberra.)

Menkhorst, P. W. (1995). ‘Mammals of Victoria. Distribution, Ecology and Conservation.’ (Oxford University Press: Melbourne.)

Peacock, D., and Abbott, I. (2014). When the ‘native cat’ would ‘plague’: historical hyperabundance in the quoll (Marsupialia: Dasyuridae) and an assessment of the role of disease, cats and foxes in its curtailment. Australian Journal of Zoology 62, 294–344.
When the ‘native cat’ would ‘plague’: historical hyperabundance in the quoll (Marsupialia: Dasyuridae) and an assessment of the role of disease, cats and foxes in its curtailment.CrossRef |

Ronquist, F., and Huelsenbeck, J. P. (2003). MRBAYES 3: Bayesian phylogenetic inference under mixed models. Bioinformatics 19, 1572–1574.
MRBAYES 3: Bayesian phylogenetic inference under mixed models.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD3sXntlKms7k%3D&md5=02d1ce4bc08174873e94010e1c055fcaCAS |

Spencer, P. B. S., Schmidt, D., and Hummel, S. (2010). Identification of historical specimens and wildlife seizures originating from highly degraded sources of kangaroos and other macropods. Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology 6, 225–232.
Identification of historical specimens and wildlife seizures originating from highly degraded sources of kangaroos and other macropods.CrossRef | 1:STN:280:DC%2BC3cjms1emsA%3D%3D&md5=d99fa9427070e74f401da513abbf6db9CAS |

Tamura, K., Peterson, D., Peterson, N., Stecher, G., Nei, M., and Kumar, S. (2011). MEGA5: molecular evolutionary genetics analysis using maximum likelihood, evolutionary distance, and maximum parsimony methods. Molecular Biology and Evolution 28, 2731–2739.
MEGA5: molecular evolutionary genetics analysis using maximum likelihood, evolutionary distance, and maximum parsimony methods.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BC3MXht1eiu73K&md5=2c355a4a27d08457798e7c3a33d35f63CAS |

Thompson, J. D., Gibson, T. J., Plewniak, F., Jeanmougin, F., and Higgins, D. G. (1997). The Clustal X windows interface: flexible strategies for multiple sequence alignment aided by quality analysis tools. Nucleic Acids Research 25, 4876–4882.
The Clustal X windows interface: flexible strategies for multiple sequence alignment aided by quality analysis tools.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DyaK1cXntFyntQ%3D%3D&md5=5dabf4e403a93574d21144b0640f5621CAS |

Woinarski, J. C. Z., Burbidge, A. A., and Harrison, P. L. (Eds) (2014). ‘The Action Plan for Australian Mammals 2012.’ (CSIRO Publishing: Melbourne.)

Woinarski, J. C. Z., Burbidge, A. A., and Harrison, P. L. (2015). Ongoing unravelling of a continental fauna: decline and extinction of Australian mammals since European settlement. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 112, 4531–4540.
Ongoing unravelling of a continental fauna: decline and extinction of Australian mammals since European settlement.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BC2MXitlagsbg%3D&md5=a6ad886626e944c94a13456264b5b511CAS |



Export Citation

View Altmetrics