Australian Mammalogy Australian Mammalogy Society
Journal of the Australian Mammal Society
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Quantifying predation attempts on arboreal marsupials using wildlife crossing structures above a major road

Kylie Soanes A C , Briony Mitchell B and Rodney van der Ree B
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A School of Ecosystem and Forest Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic. 3052, Australia.

B Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology, Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, South Yarra, Vic. 3141, Australia.

C Corresponding author. Email: ksoanes@unimelb.edu.au

Australian Mammalogy 39(2) 254-257 https://doi.org/10.1071/AM16044
Submitted: 26 August 2016  Accepted: 26 October 2016   Published: 5 December 2016

Abstract

We review eight years of monitoring data to quantify the number of predation attempts on arboreal marsupials using canopy bridges and glider poles across a major road in south-east Australia. We recorded 13 488 detections of arboreal marsupials on the structures, yet only a single (and unsuccessful) predation attempt was recorded.

Additional keywords: canopy bridge, glider pole, predator–prey interaction, road ecology.


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