Australian Mammalogy Australian Mammalogy Society
Journal of the Australian Mammal Society
RESEARCH ARTICLE

A prickly subject: innovative handling of a difficult prey

Linda Behrendorff
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, Gatton, Qld 4343, Australia. Current address: Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service, Department of National Parks, Sport and Racing, Fraser Island, Qld 4581, Australia. Email: linda.behrendorff@npsr.qld.gov.au

Australian Mammalogy - https://doi.org/10.1071/AM17024
Submitted: 5 April 2017  Accepted: 4 July 2017   Published online: 3 August 2017

Abstract

Canids are generally considered to be ambush predators, but in island ecosystems adaptability and flexibility are essential for survival. Dingoes (Canis lupus dingo) attack and kill their prey in a variety of ways including utilising waterbodies. Here I document the drowning of an adult short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) before consumption by a dingo using the coastal surf beach intertidal to shallow subtidal area on the eastern coast of Fraser Island (K’gari), highlighting an innovative prey-handling technique.

Additional keywords: beach, Canis lupus dingo, diet, Fraser Island, predator, resource subsidies.


References

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