Animal Production Science Animal Production Science Society
Food, fibre and pharmaceuticals from animals
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Dung and farm dairy effluent affect urine patch nitrous oxide emissions from a pasture

J. Li A B , J. Luo B E , Y. Shi A , Y. Li C , Y. Ma D , S. Ledgard B , L. Wang A , D. Houlbrooke B , L. Bo C and S. Lindsey B
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, Liaoning, China.

B Ruakura Research Centre, AgResearch Limited, Private Bag 3123, Hamilton, New Zealand.

C Institute of Agricultural Resources and Environment, Shandong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Jinan 250100, China.

D Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, China.

E Corresponding author. Email: Jiafa.Luo@agresearch.co.nz

Animal Production Science 56(3) 337-342 https://doi.org/10.1071/AN15511
Submitted: 1 September 2015  Accepted: 24 November 2015   Published: 9 February 2016

Abstract

Urine patches in grazed pastures have been identified as important sources of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. An increase in N2O emissions is possible where urine patches coincide with dung patches and farm dairy effluent (FDE) applications. The aim of the present study was to quantify the effects of dung additions and fresh FDE applications on N2O emissions from urine patches. A field experiment was conducted on a pasture site at the AgResearch’s Ruakura dairy farm in Hamilton, New Zealand. A closed soil chamber technique was used to measure the N2O emissions from a free-draining volcanic soil that received urine (492 kg N/ha, simulated urine patches), with or without dung (1146 kg N/ha) and fresh FDE (100 kg N/ha) and to compare these with controls receiving no urine. The addition of dung delayed the peak N2O fluxes from the urine patches by ~30 days. This could be due to temporary nitrogen (N) immobilisation during decomposition of carbon from the dung. However, over the whole measurement period (271 days), dung addition increased the N2O emission factor (EF, % of applied N emitted as N2O) for the urine from 1.02% to 2.09%. The application of fresh FDE increased the EF to 1.40%. The effluent- or dung-induced increases in N2O emissions from the urine patches were possibly caused both by the direct input of N from effluent or dung and through the indirect priming effect of addition of dung or effluent on the availability of N from urine patches for N2O production. We conclude that when EFs are used in calculations of N2O emissions from urine, consideration should be given to the likelihood of coincidence with dung or FDE applications.

Additional keywords: animal excreta, nitrate leaching, nitrogen, nutrient management, soil.


References

Akiyama H, Morimoto S, Hayastu M, Hayakawa A, Studo S, Yagi K (2013) Nitrification, ammonia-oxidizing communities, and N2O and CH4 fluxes in an imperfectly drained agricultural field fertilized with coated urea with and without dicyandiamide. Biology and Fertility of Soils 49, 213–223.
Nitrification, ammonia-oxidizing communities, and N2O and CH4 fluxes in an imperfectly drained agricultural field fertilized with coated urea with and without dicyandiamide.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BC3sXhslaku74%3D&md5=250a6246ef52f63a980f2da314cef648CAS |

Ball BC, Parker JP, Scott A (1999) Soil and residue management effects on cropping conditions and nitrous oxide fluxes under controlled traffic in Scotland 2. Nitrous oxide, soil N status and weather. Soil & Tillage Research 52, 191–201.
Soil and residue management effects on cropping conditions and nitrous oxide fluxes under controlled traffic in Scotland 2. Nitrous oxide, soil N status and weather.CrossRef |

Bogner J, Pipatti R, Hashimoto S, Diaz C, Mareckova K, Diaz L, Kjeldsen P, Monni S, Faaij A, Gao Q, Zhang T, Ahmed MA, Sutamihardja RTM, Gregory R (2008) Mitigation of global greenhouse gas emissions from waste: conclusions and strategies from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fourth assessment report. Working Group III (mitigation). Waste Management & Research 26, 11–32.
Mitigation of global greenhouse gas emissions from waste: conclusions and strategies from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fourth assessment report. Working Group III (mitigation).CrossRef |

Bolan NS, Saggar S, Luo J, Bhandral R, Singh J (2004) Gaseous emissions of nitrogen from grazed pastures: processes, measurements and modelling, environmental implications, and mitigation. Advances in Agronomy 84, 37–120.
Gaseous emissions of nitrogen from grazed pastures: processes, measurements and modelling, environmental implications, and mitigation.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD2MXnvVynsw%3D%3D&md5=9c887c7b6da4410871736a11c696d994CAS |

Chadwick DR, Pain BF, Brookman SKE (2000) Nitrous oxide and methane emissions following application of animal manures to grassland. Journal of Environmental Quality 29, 277–287.
Nitrous oxide and methane emissions following application of animal manures to grassland.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD3cXot1eisQ%3D%3D&md5=c534bae2bd6fc492e6157ff719f32e1dCAS |

Chadwick D, Sommer S, Thorman R, Fangueiro D, Cardenas L, Amon B, Misselbrook T (2011) Manure management: implications for greenhouse gas emissions. Animal Feed Science and Technology 166–167, 514–531.
Manure management: implications for greenhouse gas emissions.CrossRef |

Dalal RC, Wang W, Robertson GP, Parton WJ (2003) Nitrous oxide emission from Australian agricultural lands and mitigation options: a review. Australian Journal of Soil Research 41, 165–195.
Nitrous oxide emission from Australian agricultural lands and mitigation options: a review.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD3sXktFKisr8%3D&md5=498c42b5dc296c33f73cd52ca7928fceCAS |

de Klein CAM, Barton L, Sherlock RR, Li Z, Littlejohn RP (2003) Estimating a nitrous oxide emission factor for animal urine from some New Zealand pastoral soils. Australian Journal of Soil Research 41, 381–399.
Estimating a nitrous oxide emission factor for animal urine from some New Zealand pastoral soils.CrossRef |

de Klein CAM, Shepherd MA, van der Weerden TJ (2014) Nitrous oxide emissions from grazed grasslands: interactions between the N cycle and climate change – a New Zealand case study. Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability 9–10, 131–139.
Nitrous oxide emissions from grazed grasslands: interactions between the N cycle and climate change – a New Zealand case study.CrossRef |

Di HJ, Cameron KC (2008) Sources of nitrous oxide from 15N-labelled animal urine and urea fertiliser with and without a nitrification inhibitor, dicyandiamide (DCD). Soil Research 46, 76–82.
Sources of nitrous oxide from 15N-labelled animal urine and urea fertiliser with and without a nitrification inhibitor, dicyandiamide (DCD).CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD1cXhs1WmsLY%3D&md5=36a706ce984a27c9c1a12c36a5041ef7CAS |

Haynes RJ, Williams PH (1993) Nutrient cycling and soil fertility in the grazed pasture ecosystem. Advances in Agronomy 49, 119–199.
Nutrient cycling and soil fertility in the grazed pasture ecosystem.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DyaK3sXltlygs7Y%3D&md5=7e66c458181ce52451e838bd2edf3b5eCAS |

Hewitt AE (1993). ‘Methods and rationale of the New Zealand soil classification.’ Landcare Research Science series no. 2. (Manaaki Whenua Press: Lincoln, NZ)

Li J, Shi Y, Luo J, Zaman M, Houlbrooke D, Ding W, Ledgard S, Ghani A (2014) Use of nitrogen process inhibitors for reducing gaseous nitrogen losses from land-applied farm effluents. Biology and Fertility of Soils 50, 133–145.
Use of nitrogen process inhibitors for reducing gaseous nitrogen losses from land-applied farm effluents.CrossRef |

Luo J, Ledgard S, Lindsey S (2007) Nitrous oxide emissions from application of urea on New Zealand pasture. New Zealand Journal of Agricultural Research 50, 1–11.
Nitrous oxide emissions from application of urea on New Zealand pasture.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD2sXlvF2lu74%3D&md5=00335916577ede766232335da2de607dCAS |

Luo J, Saggar S, Bhandral R, Bolan N, Ledgard S, Lindsey S, Sun W (2008) Effects of irrigating dairy-grazed grassland with farm dairy effluent on nitrous oxide emissions. Plant and Soil 309, 119–130.
Effects of irrigating dairy-grazed grassland with farm dairy effluent on nitrous oxide emissions.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD1cXosVyhsrk%3D&md5=ae3b582e0ac0ae02238ae14987578868CAS |

Luo J, Ledgard SF, Lindsey SB (2013) Nitrous oxide and greenhouse gas emissions from grazed pastures as affected by use of nitrification inhibitor and restricted grazing regime. The Science of the Total Environment 465, 107–114.
Nitrous oxide and greenhouse gas emissions from grazed pastures as affected by use of nitrification inhibitor and restricted grazing regime.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BC3sXhs1Oqt74%3D&md5=798f79d64cd9c14dfdde33d53938f86dCAS | 23374420PubMed |

Oenema O, Wrage N, Velthof GL, van Groenigen JW, Dolfing J, Kuikman PJ (2005) Trends in global nitrous oxide emissions from animal production systems. Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems 72, 51–65.
Trends in global nitrous oxide emissions from animal production systems.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD2MXhtVKitrfP&md5=79bfadf92719a8b84fa1a79df4f4e8f4CAS |

Saggar S, Jha N, Deslippe J, Bolan NS, Luo J, Giltrap DL, Kim D-G (2013) Denitrification and N2O : N2 production in temperate grasslands: processes, measurements, modelling and mitigating negative impacts. The Science of the Total Environment 465, 173–195.
Denitrification and N2O : N2 production in temperate grasslands: processes, measurements, modelling and mitigating negative impacts.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BC38XhvVKlt73L&md5=2b97b77fbd5246af312fca8cad85f95cCAS | 23260378PubMed |

Selbie DR, Buckthought LE, Shepherd MA (2015) Chapter four: the challenge of the urine patch for managing nitrogen in grazed pasture systems. Advances in Agronomy 129, 229–292.
Chapter four: the challenge of the urine patch for managing nitrogen in grazed pasture systems.CrossRef |

Smith KA, Ball T, Conen F, Dobbie KE, Massheder J, Rey A (2003) Exchange of greenhouse gases between soil and atmosphere: interactions of soil physical factors and biological processes. European Journal of Soil Science 54, 779–791.
Exchange of greenhouse gases between soil and atmosphere: interactions of soil physical factors and biological processes.CrossRef |

Ussiri D, Lal R (2013) ‘Soil emission of nitrous oxide and its mitigation.’ (Springer: Dordrecht, The Netherlands)

van der Weerden TJ, Kelliher FM, de Klein CAM (2012) Influence of pore size distribution and soil water content on nitrous oxide emissions. Soil Research 50, 125–135.
Influence of pore size distribution and soil water content on nitrous oxide emissions.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BC38XltVOru7Y%3D&md5=aa4b1fcabc3624dd0e6db9499b0c2517CAS |

van Groenigen JW, Kuikman PJ, de Groot WJM (2005a) Nitrous oxide emission from urine-treated soil as influenced by urine composition and soil physical conditions. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 37, 463–473.
Nitrous oxide emission from urine-treated soil as influenced by urine composition and soil physical conditions.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD2cXhtFGgsrnF&md5=12b09cbcf935fa1988658ba13238db2aCAS |

van Groenigen JW, Velthof GL, van der Bolt FJE (2005b) Seasonal variation in N2O emissions from urine patches: effects of urine concentration, soil compaction and dung. Plant and Soil 273, 15–27.
Seasonal variation in N2O emissions from urine patches: effects of urine concentration, soil compaction and dung.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD2MXks1Ojs7w%3D&md5=5a6e32ffda81adb75dc76ab7e711fe01CAS |

Wachendorf C, Taube F, Wachendorf M (2005) Nitrogen leaching from 15N labelled cow urine and dung applied to grassland on a sandy soil. Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems 73, 89–100.
Nitrogen leaching from 15N labelled cow urine and dung applied to grassland on a sandy soil.CrossRef |



Rent Article (via Deepdyve) Export Citation Cited By (2)