Animal Production Science Animal Production Science Society
Food, fibre and pharmaceuticals from animals
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Herbal additives influence in vitro fermentative attributes and methanogenesis differently in cattle and buffalo

Ashok Kumar Pattanaik A B C , Santosh Laxmanrao Ingale A , Shalini Baliyan A , Narayan Dutta A , Devki Nandan Kamra A and Kusumakar Sharma A
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Clinical and Pet Nutrition Laboratory, Centre for Advanced Faculty Training in Animal Nutrition, ICAR-Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar 243122, India.

B Present address: Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois, Urbana, 61801 IL, USA.

C Corresponding author. Email: akpattanaik1@gmail.com

Animal Production Science - https://doi.org/10.1071/AN15624
Submitted: 16 September 2015  Accepted: 14 October 2017   Published online: 14 December 2017

Abstract

So as to ascertain the fermentation behaviour and methane-inhibitory efficiency of herbal additives, an in vitro gas-production study was conducted in two different sources of rumen liquor, using six herbal additives, viz. Boerhovia diffusa, Holarrhena antidysentericum, Solanum nigrum, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Withania somnifera and Woodfordia fruticosa. Each of the six herbal additives was subjected to in vitro evaluation at 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% levels of supplementation. Further, the runs were replicated using rumen-liquor inoculum sourced from cattle and buffalo, so as to explore the variation, if any, between the two species. The results indicated that there was a significant (P < 0.05) effect of both the source of inoculum and the level of supplementation on various parameters related to substrate degradation and methane production. The degree of inhibition of methane production was significantly (P < 0.05) higher with buffalo than with cattle rumen inoculum accompanying improved substrate degradation and microbial biomass production. The methanogenesis was increased when H. antidysentericum and S. nigrum were used in buffalo rumen liquor; however, these two herbal additives elicited maximum inhibition of methane production when used in cattle inoculum. When compared irrespective of inoculum, W. somnifera, W. fruticosa and B. diffusa were significantly (P < 0.001) more effective in reducing methanogenesis; however, supplementation of the B. diffusa significantly (P < 0.001) reduced the substrate-degradation attributes. Further, the degree of methane inhibition increased linearly with an increasing dose level of the additives. Overall, it is concluded that of the six herbal additives, W. somnifera and W. fruticosa were most effective in terms of optimisation of substrate degradation and inhibition of methanogenesis in vitro.

Additional keywords: methane, rumen liquor, species difference, substrate degradation.


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