Australian Journal of Botany Australian Journal of Botany Society
Southern hemisphere botanical ecosystems
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Anatomy and function of the root system of bromeliad Nidularium minutum

José L. Carvalho A , Adriana H. Hayashi B , Shoey Kanashiro B and Armando R. Tavares B C
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Universidade Cruzeiro do Sul, Av. Doutor Ussiel Cirilo 225, São Paulo 08060-070, Brazil.

B Instituto de Botânica, Av. Miguel Stéfano 3687, São Paulo 04301-902, Brazil.

C Corresponding author. Email: atavares2005@yahoo.com.br

Australian Journal of Botany 65(7) 550-555 https://doi.org/10.1071/BT17121
Submitted: 28 June 2017  Accepted: 2 October 2017   Published: 2 November 2017

Abstract

The root anatomy of bromeliad Nidularium minutum Mez was studied and the efficiency of root system in contributing to the growth, development and mineral uptake of the species evaluated. To accomplish this analysis, four treatments were applied as follows: (i) control plants with 5 mL H2O on substrate and 5 mL H2O into tank; (ii) plants supplied with nutrients to the tank with 5 mL H2O on substrate and 5 mL Hoagland and Arnon solution into tank; (iii) plants supplied with nutrients to the roots with 5 mL HA on substrate and 5 mL H2O into tank; and (iv) plants supplied with nutrients to the tank and roots with 5 mL HA on substrate and 5 mL HA into tank. Biometric variables and biomass were measured. Contents of macro- and micronutrients were evaluated in leaves, and the anatomical structure of roots was analysed. Structurally, the roots possess multiseriate epidermis, termed velamen, which is typical in Orchidaceae and other families for taking up water and nutrients. Plants supplied with nutrients to the roots had higher values than control plants for fresh and dry mass of stems, leaves and total (leaves + stems + roots), besides being more efficient than plants supplied with nutrients to the tank for nitrogen uptake. These results indicate that root system of N. minutum is very efficient for nutrients uptake when compared with the tank contributing to plant growth and development, most likely assisted by the presence of velamen.

Additional keywords: anatomical adaptations, Bromeliaceae, root anatomy, velamen.


References

Benzing DH (2000) ‘Bromeliaceae: profile of an adaptive radiation.’ (Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK)

Cambuí CA, Gaspar M, Mercier H (2009) Detection of urease in the cell wall and membranes from leaf tissues of bromeliad species. Physiologia Plantarum 136, 86–93.
Detection of urease in the cell wall and membranes from leaf tissues of bromeliad species.CrossRef |

Elias C, Fernandes EAN, França EJ, Bacchi MA (2009) Chemical changes in bromeliad leaves at different vegetative stages. Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry 282, 111–115.
Chemical changes in bromeliad leaves at different vegetative stages.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD1MXhtlSksrnJ&md5=6c9e217f28c859bd9c4e4f814c5e232fCAS |

Hoagland DR, Arnon DI (1950) ‘The water-cultured method for growing plants without soil.’ (California Agricultural Experiment Station: Berkeley, CA, USA)

Inselsbacher E, Cambui CA, Richter A, Stange CF, Mercier H, Wanek W (2007) Microbial activities and foliar uptake of nitrogen in the epiphytic bromeliad Vriesea gigantea. New Phytologist 175, 311–320.
Microbial activities and foliar uptake of nitrogen in the epiphytic bromeliad Vriesea gigantea.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD2sXptFGrur4%3D&md5=885be21d57a68cb1fbd678a80664c25dCAS |

Kämpf AN (1994) Adubação foliar em Aechmea fasciata (Lindley) Baker. Bromélia 1, 16–20.

Karnovsky MJ (1965) A formaldehyde-glutaraldehyde fixative of high osmolality for use in electron microscopy. Journal of Cell Biology 27, 137–138.

Krauss B (1949) Anatomy of the vegetative organs of the pineapple, Ananas comosus (L.) Merr. III. The root and the cork. Botanical Gazette 110, 550–587.
Anatomy of the vegetative organs of the pineapple, Ananas comosus (L.) Merr. III. The root and the cork.CrossRef |

Lin CL, Yeh DM (2008) Potassium nutrition affects leaf growth, anatomy, and macroelements of Guzmania. HortScience 43, 146–148.

Luther HE (2008) ‘An alphabetical list of bromeliad binomials.’ (Bromeliad Society International: Sarasota, FL, USA)

Malavolta E, Vitti GC, Oliveira SA (1997) ‘Evaluation of the nutritional status of plants: principles and applications.’ (POTAFOS: Piracicaba, SP, Brazil) [In Portuguese]

Males J (2016) Think tank: water relations of Bromeliaceae in their evolutionary context. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 181, 415–440.
Think tank: water relations of Bromeliaceae in their evolutionary context.CrossRef |

Martin CE (1994) Physiological ecology of the Bromeliaceae. Botanical Review 60, 1–82.
Physiological ecology of the Bromeliaceae.CrossRef |

McIlvaine TC (1921) A buffer solution for colorimetric comparison. Journal of Biological Chemistry 49, 183–186.

Mercier H, Kerbauy GB, Sotta B, Miginiac E (1997) Effects of NO3 , NH4 + and urea nutrition on endogenous levels of IAA and four cytokinins in two epiphytic bromeliads. Plant, Cell & Environment 20, 387–392.
Effects of NO3 , NH4 + and urea nutrition on endogenous levels of IAA and four cytokinins in two epiphytic bromeliads.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DyaK2sXit1Oqsrg%3D&md5=adf96fca23cb19a091f8430625464a4aCAS |

Mills HA, Jones JB (1996) ‘Plant analysis handbook II – practical sampling, preparation, analysis, and interpretation guide.’ (Micro-Macro Publishing: Athens, GA, USA)

Pierce S, Maxwell K, Griffiths H, Winter K (2001) Hydrophobic trichome layers and epicuticular wax powders in Bromeliaceae. American Journal of Botany 88, 1371–1389.
Hydrophobic trichome layers and epicuticular wax powders in Bromeliaceae.CrossRef | 1:STN:280:DC%2BC3Mngt1amtg%3D%3D&md5=7661a243fbed3c54e74a5ff3c3cf7f45CAS |

Pita PB, Menezes NL (2002) Root anatomy in species of Dyckia Schult. f. and Encholirium Mart. ex Schult. & Schult. f. (Bromeliaceae, Pitcairnioideae) from Serra do Cipó (Minas Gerais, Brazil), with special emphasis to velamen. Revista Brasileira de Botanica. Brazilian Journal of Botany 25, 25–34.
Root anatomy in species of Dyckia Schult. f. and Encholirium Mart. ex Schult. & Schult. f. (Bromeliaceae, Pitcairnioideae) from Serra do Cipó (Minas Gerais, Brazil), with special emphasis to velamen.CrossRef | [In Portuguese]

Proença SL, Sajo MG (2008) Rhizome and root anatomy of 14 species of Bromeliaceae. Rodriguésia 59, 113–128.

Reinert F, Russo CA, Salles LO (2003) The evolution of CAM in the subfamily Pitcairnioideae (Bromeliaceae). Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. Linnean Society of London 80, 261–268.
The evolution of CAM in the subfamily Pitcairnioideae (Bromeliaceae).CrossRef |

Riedell WE (2010) Mineral‐nutrient synergism and dilution responses to nitrogen fertilizer in field‐grown maize. Journal of Plant Nutrition and Soil Science 173, 869–874.
Mineral‐nutrient synergism and dilution responses to nitrogen fertilizer in field‐grown maize.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BC3cXhsVyrtr7E&md5=1502936ab94f0953a39d5faab245792dCAS |

Sakai WS (1973) Simple method for differential staining of paraffin embedded plant material using toluidine blue O. Stain Technology 48, 247–249.
Simple method for differential staining of paraffin embedded plant material using toluidine blue O.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DyaE3sXlt1ehu70%3D&md5=178ee0468c3a6cf606c8fe59a731484aCAS |

Sanches LVC (2009) Development of Aechmea fasciata (Bromeliaceae) in function of different basis saturation levels in substrate and ways of application of the fertirrigation. PhD thesis. Universidade Estadual Paulista ‘Júlio de Mesquita Filho’, Faculdade de Ciências Agronômicas, Botucatu, Brazil. [In Portuguese]

Segecin S, Scatena VL (2004) Morphology and anatomy of rhizomes and roots in Tillandsia L. (Bromeliaceae) from the ‘Campos Gerais’, PR, Brazil. Acta Botanica Brasilica 18, 253–260.
Morphology and anatomy of rhizomes and roots in Tillandsia L. (Bromeliaceae) from the ‘Campos Gerais’, PR, Brazil.CrossRef | [In Portuguese]

Silva IV, Scatena VL (2011) Anatomy of the roots of nine species of Bromeliaceae (Poales) from the Amazon, Mato Grosso, Brazil. Acta Botanica Brasilica 25, 618–627.
Anatomy of the roots of nine species of Bromeliaceae (Poales) from the Amazon, Mato Grosso, Brazil.CrossRef |

Takahashi CA, Mercier H (2011) Nitrogen metabolism in leaves of a tank epiphytic bromeliad: characterization of a spatial and functional division. Journal of Plant Physiology 168, 1208–1216.
Nitrogen metabolism in leaves of a tank epiphytic bromeliad: characterization of a spatial and functional division.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BC3MXmvVeisLw%3D&md5=670ca7e3afcfd32ba63a26fbac410613CAS |

Takahashi CA, Ceccantini GCT, Mercier H (2007) Differential capacity of nitrogen assimilation between apical and basal leaf portions of a tank epiphytic bromeliad. Brazilian Journal of Plant Physiology 19, 119–126.
Differential capacity of nitrogen assimilation between apical and basal leaf portions of a tank epiphytic bromeliad.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD1cXht1aitrY%3D&md5=76d0ad375b31881ce6ca042340a0e9e5CAS |

Tomlinson PB (1969) Commelinales-Zingiberales. In ‘Anatomy of the monocotyledons’. (Ed. CR Metcalfe) pp. 1–446. (Clarendon Press: Oxford, MS, USA)

Trépanier M, Lamy M-P, Dansereau B (2009) Phalaenopsis can absorb urea directly through their roots. Plant and Soil 319, 95–100.
Phalaenopsis can absorb urea directly through their roots.CrossRef |

Vanhoutte B, Schenkels L, Ceusters J, De Proft MP (2017) Water and nutrient uptake in Vriesea cultivars: trichomes vs. roots. Environmental and Experimental Botany 136, 21–30.
Water and nutrient uptake in Vriesea cultivars: trichomes vs. roots.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BC2sXht12nu7o%3D&md5=13c548ba6fbefd9eed63dab5f1660ba9CAS |

Winkler U, Zotz G (2009) Highly efficient uptake of phosphorus in epiphytic bromeliads. Annals of Botany 103, 477–484.
Highly efficient uptake of phosphorus in epiphytic bromeliads.CrossRef | 1:CAS:528:DC%2BD1MXjsFCktLY%3D&md5=1997dad10befb718e0ec64476839e9c8CAS |



Rent Article (via Deepdyve) Export Citation