Exploration Geophysics Exploration Geophysics Society
Journal of the Australian Society of Exploration Geophysicists
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Investigation of the line arrangement of 2D resistivity surveys for 3D inversion*

Keisuke Inoue 1 5 Hiroomi Nakazato 1 Mutsuo Takeuchi 2 Yoshihiro Sugimoto 3 Hee Joon Kim 4 Hiroshi Yoshisako 1 Michiaki Konno 1 Daisuke Shoda 1
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

1 Institute for Rural Engineering, National Agriculture and Food Research Organisation, 2-1-6, Kannondai, Tsukuba-shi, Ibaraki 305-8609, Japan.

2 Geo Vest, Inc., 3-530-175, Karasuyama, Tsuchiura-shi, Ibaraki 300-0836, Japan.

3 DIA Consultants Co., Ltd, 2-272-3 Yoshino-cho, Kita-ku, Saitama-shi, Saitama 330-8638, Japan.

4 Pukyong National University, 45 Yongso-ro, Nam-gu, Busan 608-737, Korea.

5 Corresponding author. Email: ksk@affrc.go.jp

Exploration Geophysics - https://doi.org/10.1071/EG17019
Submitted: 1 February 2017  Accepted: 5 February 2017   Published online: 17 March 2017
Originally submitted to SEGJ 30 May 2016, accepted 28 December 2016  

Abstract

We have conducted numerical and field experiments to investigate the applicability of electrode configurations and line layouts commonly used for two-dimensional (2D) resistivity surveys to 3D inversion. We examined three kinds of electrode configurations and two types of line arrangements, for 16 resistivity models of a conductive body in a homogeneous half-space. The results of the numerical experiment revealed that the parallel-line arrangement was effective in identifying the approximate location of the conductive body. The orthogonal-line arrangement was optimal for identifying a target body near the line intersection. As a result, we propose that parallel lines are useful to highlight areas of particular interest where further detailed work with an intersecting line could be carried out. In the field experiment, 2D resistivity data were measured on a loam layer with a backfilled pit. The reconstructed resistivity image derived from parallel-line data showed a low-resistivity portion near the backfilled pit. When an orthogonal line was added to the parallel lines, the newly estimated location of the backfilled pit coincided well with the actual location. In a further field application, we collected several 2D resistivity datasets in the Nojima Fault area in Awaji Island. The 3D inversion of these datasets provided a resistivity distribution corresponding to the geological structure. In particular, the Nojima Fault was imaged as the western boundary of a low-resistivity belt, from only two orthogonal lines.

Key words: 2D resistivity survey data, 3D inversion, orthogonal line, parallel line.


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