Functional Plant Biology Functional Plant Biology Society
Plant function and evolutionary biology
RESEARCH ARTICLE

The effect of elevated atmospheric [CO2] and increased temperatures on an older and modern cotton cultivar

Katrina J. Broughton A B E , Michael P. Bange A B C , Remko A. Duursma C , Paxton Payton D , Renee A. Smith C , Daniel K. Y. Tan B and David T. Tissue C
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Locked Bag 59, Narrabri, NSW 2390, Australia.

B Faculty of Agriculture and Environment, Plant Breeding Institute, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

C Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia.

D United States Department of Agriculture, Cropping Systems Research Laboratory, Lubbock, TX 79415, USA.

E Corresponding author. Email: katie.broughton@csiro.au

Functional Plant Biology 44(12) 1207-1218 https://doi.org/10.1071/FP17165
Submitted: 9 June 2017  Accepted: 10 August 2017   Published: 7 September 2017

Abstract

Changes in atmospheric [CO2], temperature and precipitation under projected climate change scenarios may have significant impacts on the physiology and yield of cotton. Understanding the implications of integrated environmental impacts on cotton is critical for developing cotton systems that are resilient to stresses induced by climate change. The objective of this study was to quantify the physiological and growth capacity of two cotton cultivars under current and future climate regimes. This experiment compared the early-season growth and physiological response of an older (DP16, released in the 1970s) and a modern (Sicot 71BRF, released in 2008) cotton cultivar grown in ambient and elevated atmospheric [CO2] (CA, 400 µL L–1 and CE, 640 µL L–1 respectively) and two temperature (TA, 28/17°C and TE, 32/21°C, day/night, respectively) treatments under well-watered conditions. CE increased biomass and photosynthetic rates compared with CA, and TE increased plant biomass. Although limited by the comparison of one older and one modern cultivar, our results suggest that substantial potential may exist to increase breeding selection of cotton cultivars that are responsive to both TE and CE.

Additional keywords: climate change, genotype, Gossypium hirsutum, growth, physiology.


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