Journal of Primary Health Care Journal of Primary Health Care Society
Journal of The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners
RESEARCH ARTICLE (Open Access)

Exploration of funding models to support hybridisation of Australian primary health care organisations

Sandeep Reddy
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

1 School of Medicine, Deakin University, Victoria, Australia

Correspondence to: Dr Sandeep Reddy, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Waurn Ponds Campus, Locked Bag 20000, Geelong, Vic. 3220, Australia. Email: sandeep.reddy@deakin.edu.au

Journal of Primary Health Care 9(3) 208-211 https://doi.org/10.1071/HC17014
Published: 25 August 2017

Journal Compilation © Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners 2017.
This is an open access article licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Abstract

Primary Health Care (PHC) funding in Australia is complex and fragmented. The focus of PHC funding in Australia has been on volume rather than comprehensive primary care and continuous quality improvement. As PHC in Australia is increasingly delivered by hybrid style organisations, an appropriate funding model that matches this set-up while addressing current issues with PHC funding is required. This article discusses and proposes an appropriate funding model for hybrid PHC organisations.


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