Health Promotion Journal of Australia Health Promotion Journal of Australia Society
Journal of the Australian Health Promotion Association
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Informing health promotion in rural men’s sheds by examination of participant health status, concerns, interests, knowledge and behaviours

Gary M. H. Misan A D , Chloe Oosterbroek B and Nathan J. Wilson C
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Rural Clinical School, University of Adelaide, Ground Floor, 122 Frome Street, Adelaide, SA 5055, Australia.

B Country SA Primary Health Care Network, PO Box 868, Nuriootpa, SA 5355, Australia.

C School of Nursing and Midwifery, Western Sydney University, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith, NSW 2751, Australia.

D Corresponding author. Email: gary.misan@adelaide.edu.au

Health Promotion Journal of Australia - https://doi.org/10.1071/HE16081
Submitted: 13 July 2016  Accepted: 31 October 2016   Published online: 22 December 2016

Abstract

Issue addressed: Despite the growth of Australian men’s sheds, the body of evidence regarding the health status of members, their health concerns, interests, help- or health-seeking behaviour and their preferred format for receiving health information is limited.

Methods: The study involved a cross-sectional study design with data collected from 11 rural South Australian (SA) men’s sheds. The survey collected information across 5 domains: demographics; health history, status, concerns and interests; health knowledge; help-seeking behaviours and health information format preferences.

Results: Data from 154 shed members were available for analysis. Rural SA sheds primarily cater for older, retired, lesser educated men from lower socioeconomic strata. The key health issues were age-related chronic conditions yet self-reported health status remained high. The GP was the preferred source of health advice. Key knowledge deficits were in the areas of reproductive and psychological health. The preferred mode for health education was hands-on or kinaesthetic approaches as opposed to seminars or internet based information.

Conclusions: Priority topics for health promotion programs should include prostate disorders, reproductive and sexual health issues, psychological health, risk factors for common chronic disease and bowel cancer. Programs should incorporate hands-on education approaches. Shed and shed member diversity should be considered when designing programs.

So what?: A better understanding of what ails men’s shed members, what concerns and interests them in terms of health, where they go for health advice and their preferred format for receiving health information increases the likelihood of developing health promotion programs that better engage with this target group.

Key words: health promotion, health seeking, kinaesthetic learning, learning preferences, learning styles.


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