Health Promotion Journal of Australia Health Promotion Journal of Australia Society
Journal of the Australian Health Promotion Association
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Nurse provision of support to help inpatients quit smoking

V. Malone A F , N. Ezard A B , S. Hodge C , L. Ferguson A , A. Schembri A B D and B. Bonevski E
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Level 2, The O’Brien Centre, St Vincent’s Hospital, 390 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia.

B University of NSW, Faculty of Medicine, UNSW Australia, NSW 2052, Australia.

C Network of Alcohol and Other Drugs Agencies, PO Box 2345, Strawberry Hills, NSW 2012, Australia.

D Australian Catholic University, PO Box 968, North Sydney, NSW 2059, Australia.

E University of Newcastle, 5014 Level 5, McAuley Centre, Calvary Mater Hospital, Edith Street, Waratah, NSW 2298, Australia.

F Corresponding author. Email: victoria.malone@svha.org.au

Health Promotion Journal of Australia - https://doi.org/10.1071/HE16082
Submitted: 18 July 2016  Accepted: 13 October 2016   Published online: 19 December 2016

Abstract

Issue addressed: Identification of the factors that facilitate nurses to provide smoking cessation advice to hospitalised patients.

Method: Six semistructured focus groups with 26 nurses were conducted in June 2015. Participants completed a structured survey to collect patient demographic data and assess attitudes towards their role in addressing smoking cessation among inpatients.

Results: Important themes that emerged from the qualitative data were: nurses’ negative perceptions of smokers, nurses’ confidence in their knowledge of smoking cessation care and nurses’ uncertainty around whose role it is to provide smoking cessation care.

Conclusion: Nurses require training in order to confidently and competently address smoking among inpatients as part of routine care. Formal ways to document the smoking status of inpatients and the offer of smoking cessation support from a nurse to an inpatient would enhance the communication between nurses around which inpatients had been asked about their smoking status and which had not. For patients who are resistant to conventional cessation strategies, innovative ways are needed to reduce the harm caused to them by tobacco use.

So what?: Nurses need to be provided with education and training around smoking cessation to increase their confidence and skills to provide smoking cessation care to inpatients.

Key words: health education, qualitative methods, smoking cessation, tobacco use.


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