Marine and Freshwater Research Marine and Freshwater Research Society
Advances in the aquatic sciences
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Interdisciplinary conservation; meeting the challenge for a better outcome: experiences from sturgeon conservation

Carolyn M. Rosten
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA), Høgskoleringen 9, PO Box 6215, NO-7486 Trondheim, Norway. Email: carolyn.rosten@nina.no

Marine and Freshwater Research 68(9) 1577-1584 https://doi.org/10.1071/MF16085
Submitted: 19 March 2016  Accepted: 19 November 2016   Published: 1 February 2017

Abstract

Despite an obvious benefit by involving society in conservation research, interdisciplinary research remains the exception and not the norm. Integration of natural and social science into interdisciplinary conservation research poses several challenges related to (1) different perspectives and theories of knowledge, (2) mismatches in expectations of appropriate data (i.e. quantitative v. qualitative, accuracy), (3) an absence of agreed frameworks and communication issues and (4) different publishing protocols and approaches for reaching conclusions. Hence, when embarking on an interdisciplinary conservation project, there are several stereotypic challenges that may be met along the way. On the basis of experiences with an interdisciplinary sturgeon conservation project, several recommendations are presented for those considering (or considering not!) to establish interdisciplinary conservation research.

Additional keywords: cross-disciplinary collaboration, multidisciplinary, science and politics.


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