Pacific Conservation Biology Pacific Conservation Biology Society
A journal dedicated to conservation and wildlife management in the Pacific region.
COMMENT AND RESPONSE

Response to ‘Fauna-rescue programs highlight unresolved scientific, ethical and animal welfare issues’ by Menkhorst et al.

Scott A. Thompson A C and Graham G. Thompson A B C
+ Author Affliations
- Author Affliations

A Terrestrial Ecosystems, 10 Houston Place, Mt Claremont, WA 6010, Australia.

B Adjunct School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Perth, WA 6009, Australia.

C Corresponding authors. Email: scott@terrestrialecosystems.com; graham@terrestrialecosystems.com

Pacific Conservation Biology 22(4) 304-307 https://doi.org/10.1071/PC16015
Submitted: 1 April 2016  Accepted: 1 April 2016   Published: 20 June 2016

Abstract

There is limited knowledge on the success or failure of fauna relocations associated with vegetation clearing programs. This paper comments on issues raised by other authors and provides some suggested guidelines that can be applied in the absence of scientific evidence.


References

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