Pacific Conservation Biology Pacific Conservation Biology Society
A journal dedicated to conservation and wildlife management in the Pacific region.
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Habitat use by grey-crowned babbler, Pomatostomus temporalis, in urban and peri-urban environments

Kathryn Teare Ada Lambert A B and Hugh Ford A

A Centre in Behavioural and Physiological Ecology, Zoology, School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia.

B Corresponding author. Email: kathryn.ta.lambert@gmail.com

Pacific Conservation Biology 23(1) 88-94 https://doi.org/10.1071/PC16023
Submitted: 24 May 2016  Accepted: 4 September 2016   Published: 11 November 2016

Abstract

Habitat loss in the urban environment leads to a high rate of local extinction of native fauna. In contrast, where key habitat structures, such as woody debris, shrubs and trees, are maintained, urban landscapes can retain many native species. To manage urban habitats successfully for urban bird communities, it is, therefore, necessary to understand the habitat requirements of the species using them. We have previously shown that the grey-crowned babbler, Pomatostomus temporalis, exhibits similar mean weight, sex ratio and group size in natural and altered habitat in and around Dubbo, New South Wales. In the present study, we detail the movements and habitat use of the groups that inhabit urban areas. We found that groups behaved similarly in urban and peri-urban areas, but showed small differences in the frequency of behaviours, based on the habitat feature that was available. The results suggested that, despite the decline of the grey-crowned babbler in the southern parts of its range, this species is able to survive in altered habitats, if nesting habitat and ground cover remain available and neighbouring groups persist nearby. Because other woodland bird species have shown similar responses to urban environments, managers of urban parkland should provide foraging substrates for a variety of woodland bird species, including vulnerable species, to ameliorate threatening processes and protect key habitat requirements.

Additional keywords: behavioural ecology, spatial ecology, urbanisation.


References

Blackmore, C. J., and Heinsohn, R. (2007). Reproductive success and helper effects in the cooperatively breeding Grey-crowned Babbler Pomatostomus temporalis. Journal of Zoology (London, England) 273, 326–332.
Reproductive success and helper effects in the cooperatively breeding Grey-crowned Babbler Pomatostomus temporalis.CrossRef | open url image1

Briggs, S. V., Seddon, J. A., and Doyle, S. J. (2007). Structures of bird communities in woodland remnants in central New South Wales, Australia. Australian Journal of Zoology 55, 29–40.
Structures of bird communities in woodland remnants in central New South Wales, Australia.CrossRef | open url image1

Brooker, M. G., Braithwaite, R. W., and Estbergs, J. A. (1990). Foraging ecology of some insectivorous and nectivorous species of birds in forests and woodlands of the wet–dry tropics of Australia. Emu 90, 215–230.
Foraging ecology of some insectivorous and nectivorous species of birds in forests and woodlands of the wet–dry tropics of Australia.CrossRef | open url image1

Chamberlain, D. E., Cannon, A. R., Toms, M. P., Leech, D. I., Hatchwell, B. J., and Gaston, K. J. (2009). Avian productivity in urban landscapes: a review and meta-analysis. The Ibis 151, 1–18.
Avian productivity in urban landscapes: a review and meta-analysis.CrossRef | open url image1

Clergeau, P., Savard, J.-P. L., Mennechez, G., and Falardeau, G. (1998). Bird abundance and diversity along an urban-rural gradient: a comparative study between two cities on different continents. The Condor 100, 413–425.
Bird abundance and diversity along an urban-rural gradient: a comparative study between two cities on different continents.CrossRef | open url image1

Counsilman, J. J. (1977). A comparison of two populations of the grey-crowned babbler (part 1) Bird Behaviour 1, 43–80. open url image1

Counsilman, J. J. (1979). Note on the breeding biology of the grey-crowned babbler. Bird Behaviour 1, 114–124.
Note on the breeding biology of the grey-crowned babbler.CrossRef | open url image1

Counsilman, J. J. (1980). A comparison of two populations of the grey-crowned babbler (part 2). Bird Behaviour 2, 1–109.
A comparison of two populations of the grey-crowned babbler (part 2).CrossRef | open url image1

Davidson, I., and Robinson, D. (1992). ‘Grey-crowned Babbler Action Statement No. 34.’ (Department of Sustainability and Environment: Melbourne.)

Dow, D. D., and King, B. R. (1984). Communal building of brood and roost nests by the Grey-crowned Babbler Pomatostomus temporalis. Emu 84, 193–199.
Communal building of brood and roost nests by the Grey-crowned Babbler Pomatostomus temporalis.CrossRef | open url image1

Gill, B. J., and Dow, D. D. (1984). Waking and roosting of grey-crowned babblers Pomatostomus temporalis in south-east Queensland during spring. Emu 85, 97–105. open url image1

Higgins, P. J., and Peter, J. M. (Eds) (2002). ‘Handbook of Australian, New Zealand and Antarctic Birds. Vol. 6: Pardalotes to Shrike-thrushes.’ (Oxford University Press: Melbourne.)

Hodgson, P., French, K., and Major, R. E. (2006). Comparison of foraging behaviour of small, urban-sensitive insectivores in continuous woodland and woodland remnants in a suburban landscape. Wildlife Research 33, 591–603.
Comparison of foraging behaviour of small, urban-sensitive insectivores in continuous woodland and woodland remnants in a suburban landscape.CrossRef | open url image1

Ikin, K., Barton, P. S., Knight, E., Lindenmayer, D. B., Fischer, J., and Manning, A. D. (2014). Bird community responses to the edge between suburbs and reserves. Oecologia 174, 545–557.
Bird community responses to the edge between suburbs and reserves.CrossRef | open url image1

King, B. R. (1980). Social organisation and behaviour of the grey-crowned babbler Pomatostomus temporalis temporalis. Emu 80, 59–76.
Social organisation and behaviour of the grey-crowned babbler Pomatostomus temporalis temporalis.CrossRef | open url image1

Lambert, K. T. A., Geering, D., and Ford, H. (2013). Group size and composition in the grey-crowned babbler Pomatostomus temporalis in an urban environment. Corella 37, 57–61. open url image1

Major, R. E., Christie, F. J., and Gowing, G. (2001). Influence of remnant and landscape attributes on Australian woodland bird communities. Biological Conservation 102, 47–66.
Influence of remnant and landscape attributes on Australian woodland bird communities.CrossRef | open url image1

Moffatt, J. D. (1982). Territoriality and use of space in grey-crowned babblers, Pomatostomus temporalis. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Queensland, Brisbane.

NSW Office of Environment and Heritage (2012). ‘Pomatostomus temporalis Threatened Species Profile. (NSW Office of Environment and Heritage: Sydney.) Available at http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/threatenedspeciesapp/profile.aspx?id=10660 [Verified 12 October 2009]

Olsen, P. (2008). The state of Australia’s birds. Wingspan 18, 1–40. open url image1

Ostro, L. E. T., Young, T. P., Silver, S. C., and Koontz, F. W. (1999). A geographic information system method for estimating home range size. The Journal of Wildlife Management 63, 748–755.
A geographic information system method for estimating home range size.CrossRef | open url image1

Portelli, D. (2005). The socioecology of the cooperatively breeding chestnut-crowned babbler (Pomatostomus ruficeps). B.Sc.(Hons) Thesis, University of New South Wales, Sydney.

Rayner, L., Evans, M. J., Gibbons, P., Ikin, K., Lindenmayer, D. B., and Manning, A. D. (2015). Avifauna and urban encroachment in time and space. Diversity & Distributions 21, 428–440.
Avifauna and urban encroachment in time and space.CrossRef | open url image1

Robinson, D. (1994). Research plan for threatened woodland birds of southeast Australia. ARI Technical Report Series 133. DCNR, Melbourne.

Robinson, D., Davidson, I., and Tzaros, C. (2002). Biology and conservation of the grey-crowned babbler in Victoria. Flora and fauna technical report no. 148. Department of Natural Resources and Environment, Melbourne.

Sewell, S. R., and Catterall, C. P. (1998). Bushland modifications and styles of urban development: their effects on birds in south-east Queensland. Wildlife Research 25, 41–63.
Bushland modifications and styles of urban development: their effects on birds in south-east Queensland.CrossRef | open url image1

Simondson, D. (2001). ‘Grey-crowned Babblers and habitat: a limiting factor of dispersal?’ Ph.D. thesis, University of Melbourne, Dookie Campus.

Stevens, K. P., Holland, G. J., Clarke, R. H., Cooke, R., and Bennett, A. F. (2015). What determines habitat quality for a declining woodland bird in a fragmented environment: the grey-crowned babbler Pomatostomus temporalis in south-eastern Australia? PLoSOne 10, e0130738.
What determines habitat quality for a declining woodland bird in a fragmented environment: the grey-crowned babbler Pomatostomus temporalis in south-eastern Australia?CrossRef | open url image1



Supplementary MaterialSupplementary Material (3.2 MB) Export Citation