Pacific Conservation Biology Pacific Conservation Biology Society
A journal dedicated to conservation and wildlife management in the Pacific region.
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Values, credibility, and ethics: public advocacy and conservation science

Harry F. Recher
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

School of Natural Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, WA 6027, Australia and Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia and Australian Museum Research Institute, Australian Museum, Sydney, NSW 2000, Australia. Email: hfrecher@gmail.com

Pacific Conservation Biology - https://doi.org/10.1071/PC17025
Submitted: 31 July 2017  Accepted: 9 October 2017   Published online: 19 December 2017

Abstract

While it is important for conservation scientists to advise government on policy, they need to do more than give advice. Conservation scientists need to be public advocates for the creation of economies that are ecologically sustainable. To achieve sustainability conservation scientists must assume a role of leadership in the development and application of global environmental policies. Not all scientists agree with advocacy, but advocacy for conservation of the natural world means creating an ethical world, a world where all generations and people as well as all other species can share the Earth’s resources. At present that world does not exist and conservation scientists need to take a more active role in its creation.

Additional keywords: advocacy, biodiversity conservation, communication, ethics, policy, science education, social responsibility


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