Pacific Conservation Biology Pacific Conservation Biology Society
A journal dedicated to conservation and wildlife management in the Pacific region.
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Are there conservation implications for kangaroos feeding on sea birds?

Michael Hughes A C and Valériane Bérengier A B
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University, Murdoch, WA 6150, Australia.

B University of Western Brittany, 3 Rue des Archives, 29238 Brest, France.

C Corresponding author. Email: m.hughes@murdoch.edu.au

Pacific Conservation Biology - https://doi.org/10.1071/PC17038
Submitted: 28 September 2017  Accepted: 27 November 2017   Published online: 4 January 2018

Abstract

This research note documents an observation of a wild western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) feeding on a dead silver gull (Chroicocephalus novaehollandiae) at Lucky Bay in the Cape Le Grand National Park on the south coast of Western Australia. Published evidence suggests that this behaviour is not unique and could be widespread in Western Australia and further afield. We consider why the kangaroo may be feeding on the dead gull and possible implications for conservation programs relying on poison meat baits to control introduced species.

Additional keywords: feeding behaviour, nutrients, poison meat baits, western grey kangaroo


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