Australian Journal of Primary Health Australian Journal of Primary Health Society
The issues influencing community health services and primary health care
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Positive cardiometabolic health for adults with intellectual disability: an early intervention framework

Julian Trollor A , Carmela Salomon A G , Jackie Curtis B C , Andrew Watkins B D , Simon Rosenbaum B C , Katherine Samaras E and Philip B. Ward C F
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Department of Developmental Disability Neuropsychiatry, University of New South Wales, 34 Botany Street, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.

B South Eastern Sydney Local Health District, Prince of Wales Mental Health, 26 Llandaff Street, Bondi Junction, NSW 2022, Australia.

C School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Wallace Wurth Building, 18 High Street, Kensington, NSW 2052, Australia.

D Faculty of Health, University of Technology, Sydney, PO Box 123, Broadway NSW 2007, Australia.

E Department of Endocrinology, St Vincent’s Hospital, 390 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, NSW 2010, Australia.

F South Western Sydney Local Health District, Schizophrenia Research Unit, Liverpool Hospital, Elizabeth Street, Liverpool, NSW 2170, Australia.

G Corresponding author. Email: c.salomon@unsw.edu.au

Australian Journal of Primary Health 22(4) 288-293 https://doi.org/10.1071/PY15130
Submitted: 12 August 2015  Accepted: 5 June 2016   Published: 22 July 2016

Abstract

Cardiometabolic morbidity is a significant contributor to the poorer health outcomes experienced by people with intellectual disability (ID). Tailoring cardiometabolic monitoring tools developed for the general population to better fit the altered risk profiles and extra needs of people with ID may help to improve health outcomes. This paper describes a new cardiometabolic monitoring framework designed to address the extra needs of people with ID. The framework was adapted from a generalist guideline after a process of extensive consultation with the original authors and over 30 ID and cardiometabolic experts. In addition to standard cardiometabolic monitoring practice, the framework encourages clinicians to: anticipate and address barriers to care such as communication difficulties and fear of blood tests; account for socioeconomic and genetic factors altering baseline cardiometabolic risk; and carefully rationalize psychotropic prescription. Together with this framework, a toolkit of free cardiometabolic resources tailored for people with ID and formal and informal carers is included. The monitoring framework promotes a multidisciplinary and holistic approach to cardiometabolic care for people with ID.


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