Australian Journal of Primary Health Australian Journal of Primary Health Society
The issues influencing community health services and primary health care
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Workforce insights on how health promotion is practised in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service

Kathryn McFarlane A D , Sue Devine A , Jenni Judd A C , Nina Nichols B and Kerrianne Watt A
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, 1 James Cook Drive, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia.

B Apunipima Cape York Health Council, PO Box 12045, Westcourt, Qld 4870, Australia.

C Present address: School of Human Health and Social Sciences, Central Queensland University, 14 Banyan Street, Bundaberg, Qld 4670, Australia.

D Corresponding author. Email: kathryn.mcfarlane@my.jcu.edu.au

Australian Journal of Primary Health 23(3) 243-248 https://doi.org/10.1071/PY16033
Submitted: 10 March 2016  Accepted: 24 November 2016   Published: 6 February 2017

Abstract

Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services deliver holistic and culturally appropriate primary health care to over 150 communities in Australia. Health promotion is a core function of comprehensive primary health care; however, little has been published on what enables or challenges health promotion practice in an Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service. Apunipima Cape York Health Council (Apunipima) delivers primary health care to 11 remote north Queensland communities. The workforce includes medical, allied health, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and health practitioners and corporate support staff. This study aimed to identify current health promotion practices at Apunipima, and the enablers and challenges identified by the workforce, which support or hinder health promotion practice. Sixty-three staff from across this workforce completed an online survey in February 2015 (42% response rate). Key findings were: (1) health promotion is delivered across a continuum of one-on-one approaches through to population advocacy and policy change efforts; (2) the attitude towards health promotion was very positive; and (3) health promotion capacity can be enhanced at both individual and organisational levels. Workforce insights have identified areas for continued support and areas that, now identified, can be targeted to strengthen the health promotion capacity of Apunipima.


References

Apunipima Cape York Health Council (2013) About Apunipima. Available at http://www.apunipima.org.au/about [Verified 10 November 2015]

Apunipima Cape York Health Council (2014) The Apunipima model of care: an holistic approach to health and wellbeing for communities and families in Cape York. Available at http://www.apunipima.org.au/images/publications/Corporatedocuments/5027_CSS_Apunipima_Model_ of_Care.pdf [Verified 27 August 2015]

Australian Bureau of Statistics (2011) Quickstats. Available at http://www.abs.gov.au/websitedbs/censushome.nsf/home/quickstats?opendocument&navpos=220 [Verified 25 November 2015]

Australian Health Promotion Association (2009) Core competencies for health promotion practitioners. Available at http://www.healthpromotion.org.au/images/stories/pdf/core%20competencies%20for%20hp%20practitioners.pdf [Verified 25 July 2015]

Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (2014) Health indicators for remote service delivery communities: a summary report 2033–2011. Catalogue number.IHW142. AIHW, Canberra, ACT, Australia.

Commonwealth Department of Health and Aged Care (2001) Measuring Remoteness: Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia (ARIA), Revised Edition. Occasional Papers: New Series Number 14. (Canberra, ACT, Australia) Available at http://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/E2EE19FE831F26BFCA257BF0001F3DFA/$File/ocpanew14.pdf

Devine SG, Llewellyn-Jones L, Lloyd J (2009) Impact of a five-day short course on integration of health promotion into practice in north Queensland. Health Promotion Journal of Australia 20, 69–71.
Impact of a five-day short course on integration of health promotion into practice in north Queensland.CrossRef |

Hawe P, Noort M, King L, Jordens C (1997) Multiplying health gains: the critical role of capacity-building within health promotion programs. Health Policy 39, 29–42.
Multiplying health gains: the critical role of capacity-building within health promotion programs.CrossRef | 1:STN:280:DyaK2s7ptFykug%3D%3D&md5=0e5e73c4f09dd46ed85a2b9e3c5d1eceCAS |

James EL, Fraser C, Anderson K, Judd F (2007) Use of research by the Australian health promotion workforce. Health Education Research 22, 576–587.
Use of research by the Australian health promotion workforce.CrossRef |

Labonte R (1992) Heart health inequalities in Canada: modules, theory and planning. Health Promotion International 7, 119–128.
Heart health inequalities in Canada: modules, theory and planning.CrossRef |

McCalman J, Tsey K, Bainbridge RG, Rowley KG, Percival N, O’Donoghue L, Brands J, Whiteside M, Judd J (2014) The characteristics, implementation and effects of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion tools: a systematic literature search. BMC Public Health 14, 712
The characteristics, implementation and effects of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion tools: a systematic literature search.CrossRef |

McFarlane K, Judd J, Devine S, Watt K (2016) Reorientation of health services: a literature review of the enablers and barriers organisations faced when increasing their health promotion capacity. Health Promotion Journal of Australia 27, 118–133.
Reorientation of health services: a literature review of the enablers and barriers organisations faced when increasing their health promotion capacity.CrossRef |

National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (2014) About us. Available at http://www.naccho.org.au/about-us/ [Verified 28 July 2014]

O’Donoghue L, Percival N, Laycock A, McCalman J, Tsey K, Armit C, Bailie R (2014) Evaluating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion activities using audit and feedback. Australian Journal of Primary Health 20, 339–344.
Evaluating Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion activities using audit and feedback.CrossRef |

Public Health Association of Australia (2014) Primary health care policy. Available at http://www.phaa.net.au/documents/item/266 [Verified 26 November 2015]

Talbot L, Verrinder G (2005) ‘Promoting Health: the Primary Health Care Approach’, 3rd edn. (Elsevier: Sydney, NSW, Australia)

Victorian Healthcare Association (2009) Position statement: health promoting health services. Available at http://www.vha.org.au/docs/20091015–position-statement–health-promoting-health-services.pdf [Verified 12 February 2016]

Wakerman J, Humphreys JC, Wells R, Kuipers P, Entwistle P, Jones J (2008) Primary health care delivery models in rural and remote Australia – a systematic review. BMC Health Services Research 8, 276
Primary health care delivery models in rural and remote Australia – a systematic review.CrossRef |

World Health Organization (1986) Ottawa charter for health promotion. Canadian Journal of Public Health 77, 425–430.
Ottawa charter for health promotion.CrossRef |



Export Citation Cited By (1)

View Altmetrics