The Rangeland Journal The Rangeland Journal Society
Rangeland ecology and management
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Where to from here? Challenges for restoration and revegetation in a fast-changing world

R. J. Hobbs
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

School of Biological Science, University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia. Email: richard.hobbs@uwa.edu.au

The Rangeland Journal - https://doi.org/10.1071/RJ17053
Submitted: 29 May 2017  Accepted: 26 July 2017   Published online: 23 August 2017

Abstract

Ecological restoration provides hope and the opportunity for positive action in the face of ongoing rapid environmental change. Restoration techniques and approaches are improving, and restoration is seen as an important element of conservation management and policy from local to global scales. Motivations for undertaking restoration are numerous, and resources available for this enterprise vary greatly from case to case. Restoration encompasses everything from multinational companies restoring minesites or offsets to comply with environmental regulations to local bushcare groups doing voluntary work in their local patch of bush. The financial and human resources available largely determine the extent and type of restoration activities that are possible. An important task is increasing the resources available for these activities, but it is also important to recognise that resources will continue to fall well short of what is actually required into the foreseeable future. In addition, the need for restoration will only increase with ongoing development and changing environments. In this scenario, how then, should decisions be made about what types of restoration activities are appropriate and possible? How do we ensure that the good intentions behind restoration management and policy translate into good outcomes? Challenges for restoration include not only improving the techniques and approaches but also tackling hard questions about what restoration goals are appropriate and engaging in open discussion of hidden assumptions and values behind decisions.

Additional keywords: restoration goals, restoration outcomes, standards.


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