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RESEARCH ARTICLE

Health Care Services for men who have sex with men in different Australian states and territories since the emergence of HIV

Cathy Pell A D , Simon Donohoe B and Damian Conway C
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Taylor Square Private Clinic, 393 Bourke St, Darlinghurst 2010, NSW, Australia.

B AFAO/NAPWA Education Team (ANET) and National A&TSI HIV/AIDS Sexual Health Project, PO Box 51, Newtown 2042, Australia.

C Education Division, Australasian Society for HIV Medicine, LMB 5057, Darlinghurst 1300, NSW, Australia.

D Corresponding author. Email: cpell@medemail.com.au

Sexual Health 5(2) 161-168 https://doi.org/10.1071/SH07101
Submitted: 30 December 2007  Accepted: 24 April 2008   Published: 2 June 2008

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to describe sexual health services available in Australia across the different states and territories for gay men and men who have sex with men (MSM) and their utilisation. An assessment of services available in different states is made, then the evidence about how MSM and people living with HIV/AIDS access health care in Australia is presented. This demonstrates that the number and location of sexual health services has changed over time. It also demonstrates that services available differ by state and territory. The availability of non-occupational post-exposure prophylaxis for HIV infection has been different in each state and territory, as has its utilisation. The majority of care for sexual health-related issues and for MSM and people living with HIV/AIDS is delivered in general practice settings in Australia, with hospital outpatient settings, including sexual health clinics, utilised commonly.

Additional keywords: post-exposure prophylaxis, sexual health services.


Acknowledgements

We would like to acknowledge and thank all of the participants in the research cited above. We would like to thank the AIDS council officers Simon Yam, Paul Martin, Brian Morris, Colin Batrouney, Colin Burden and David Mills. We would like to thank Levinia Crooks for her review of drafts of the manuscript and advice about the Australian health system.


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