Wildlife Research Wildlife Research Society
Ecology, management and conservation in natural and modified habitats
Wildlife Research

Wildlife Research

Volume 42 Number 4 2015

WR14222How many are there? Multiple-covariate distance sampling for monitoring pampas deer in Corrientes, Argentina

Talía Zamboni, Alicia Delgado, Ignacio Jiménez-Pérez and Carlos De Angelo
pp. 291-301
Graphical Abstract Image

Pampas deer, Ozotoceros bezoarticus, is an endangered species in Argentina, where scarce information exists about one of the four remaining populations. Deer density estimated using a Multiple-covariate Distance Sampling engine determined a larger population than previous studies. Our estimates and methods can be used as a baseline for future population monitoring, considering covariate distance sampling can provide more realistic population estimates, also suggesting the inclusion of additional variables for future analysis. Photograph by Talía Zamboni.

Graphical Abstract Image

Little is known about fire- or cane toad invasion-responses of biota within fire-sensitive non-riparian savanna vegetation types. This study tested whether fire- and cane toad invasion-responses were greater and lesser respectively in Kimberley pindan woodlands than in savannas generally. Fire management of pindan woodlands needs to reduce frequency of high intensity fires to less than one in five years based on fire-responses; low cane toad impacts to pindan biota suggest non-riparian savannas may provide partial invasion refuge for fauna.

Graphical Abstract Image

Assessments of GPS collar performance are needed to ensure that reliable information is obtained and resources are wisely allocated. GPS collars affixed to bison often failed due to animal behaviour, with those on males performing particularly poorly; however, undamaged collars provided high data acquistion rates that was largely free from temporal biases. Our data highlight that researchers should plan for catastrophic failures in their GPS collar-based studies. Photograph by T. S. Jung.

Graphical Abstract Image

Urban development is a key threat to the squirrel glider because its distribution coincides with where many people live. Using camera trapping methods, we investigated glider use of large, hollow-bearing trees in a typical urban–rural matrix, and found that tree height, road density, noise and light pollution affected their activity and occupancy. Squirrel gliders will tolerate human disturbances to a certain extent; however, novel solutions are required to lessen these impacts where native vegetation is retained in urban areas for conservation purposes.

Graphical Abstract Image

We investigated the risks associated with geographical extrapolation of ecological information, using the quokka (Setonix brachyurus) as a case study. We found that extrapolation of knowledge between ecologically diverse regions resulted in significant sources of error and consequently an inappropriate management of habitat and an increased risk of local extinctions. Where such extrapolation is necessary, actions should be implemented in a management framework that can detect adverse effects, allow for inclusion of new ecological information, and explicitly consider the limitations and assumptions of the approach. Photograph by K. Bain.

Graphical Abstract Image

Amami-Ohshima Island, Japan is one of the islands where feral cat predations on endemic species have been seriously concerned but not studied. We conducted scat analysis to reveal the feral cat diet and founded three IUCN Red List species were among the main prey species. The feral cat managements should be considered to prevent another extinction of endemic species. Photograph by Amami Wildlife Conservation Center.

WR15025Ecological effects of game management: does supplemental feeding affect herbivory pressure on native vegetation?

María Miranda, Ignacio Cristóbal, Leticia Díaz, Marisa Sicilia, Eduarda Molina-Alcaide, Jordi Bartolomé, Yolanda Fierro and Jorge Cassinello
pp. 353-361
Graphical Abstract Image

Supplemental food may be used to increase game populations and trophy sizes, but could influence the effects herbivores have on plants. We investigated how supplemental feeding of Iberian red deer Cervus elaphus hispanicus influenced their effects on Mediterranean woody plants. Since browsing was higher on plants with complementary nutrients to the supplied food, we recommend the nutrients in supplemental food to be adjusted to local plant communities. Photograph by Research Group on Behavioural Ecology and Conservation Biology of Ungulates, Instituto de Investigación en Recursos Cinegéticos (IREC), CSIC-UCLM-JCCM.

Graphical Abstract Image

Continued use of pindone, an anticoagulant poison, for rabbit management requires improved understanding of the secondary risk presented to predatory and scavenging wildlife. We generated new data on residual concentrations of pindone in the tissues of poisoned rabbits using laboratory and field-based testing. Concentrations of residual pindone in fat and liver of poisoned rabbits suggest that secondary poisoning hazard to some non-target predators and scavengers is high and this should be further evaluated in field-based assessments of the non-target impact. Photograph by Donna Falconer, Eastern Falcon Conservation Trust, New Zealand.

Submit Article

Use the online submission system to send us your manuscript.

Advertisement