Australian Journal of Zoology Australian Journal of Zoology Society
Evolutionary, molecular and comparative zoology
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Characterisation of microsatellites for Litoria nannotis (Amphibia : Hylidae), an endangered waterfall frog endemic to the Australian Wet Tropics

Robert Puschendorf A B E , Erica V. Todd C and Michael G. Gardner D
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A School of Biological and Marine Sciences, Plymouth University, Drake Circus, Plymouth, Devon PL4 8AA, UK.

B College of Marine and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Qld 4811, Australia.

C Department of Anatomy, University of Otago, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand.

D School of Biological Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia, and Australian Centre for Evolutionary Biology and Biodiversity, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia, and Evolutionary Biology Unit, South Australian Museum, North Terrace, Adelaide, SA 5000, Australia.

E Corresponding author. Email: robert.puschendorf@plymouth.ac.uk

Australian Journal of Zoology 64(6) 390-394 https://doi.org/10.1071/ZO16072
Submitted: 18 October 2016  Accepted: 2 March 2017   Published: 23 March 2017

Abstract

Litoria nannotis is an endangered waterfall frog from the wet tropics region in north Queensland that has suffered significant population declines due to the emerging fungal disease known as chytridiomycosis. The species has two deeply divergent lineages, and we used 454 shotgun sequencing of DNA extracted from one individual of the northern lineage to identify and design PCR primers for 576 microsatellite loci. Thirty markers were tested for amplification success and variability in a population sample from each lineage. Of these, 17 were found to be polymorphic in the northern lineage and 10 loci were polymorphic in the southern lineage. Numbers of alleles per locus ranged from 2 to 14 (mean = 6.47, s.d. = 4.02) for the northern lineage (17 polymorphic loci), and from 2 to 8 (mean = 5.40, s.d. = 2.55) in the southern lineage (10 polymorphic loci). Levels of heterozygosity were high in both lineages (northern mean HE = 0.63, s.d. = 0.21, range = 0.27–0.89; southern mean HE = 0.57, s.d. = 0.25, range = 0.18–0.81). These loci will be useful in understanding the genetic variation and connectivity amongst populations of this species recovering from mass population declines due to disease.

Additional keywords: 454 GSFLX, population declines, shotgun sequencing.


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