Australian Mammalogy Australian Mammalogy Society
Journal of the Australian Mammal Society
RESEARCH ARTICLE

A permanent security post for camera trapping

Paul D. Meek A B C E , Guy-Anthony Ballard D and Peter J. S. Fleming C

A Invasive Animals Cooperative Research Centre, PO Box 4019, Coffs Harbour Jetty, NSW 2450, Australia.

B Ecosystem Management, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia.

C Vertebrate Pest Research Unit, NSW Department of Primary Industries, Orange Agricultural Institute, Locked Bag 6001, Orange, NSW 2800, Australia.

D Vertebrate Pest Research Unit, NSW Department of Primary Industries, PO Box U86, University of New England, Armidale, NSW 2351, Australia.

E Corresponding author. Email: paul.meek@invasiveanimals.com

Australian Mammalogy 35(1) 123-127 http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/AM12014
Submitted: 29 February 2012  Accepted: 15 June 2012   Published: 26 October 2012

Abstract

As the use of camera traps in wildlife management in Australia rapidly increases, government agencies, private enterprises, universities and individuals are investing considerable amounts of money in camera trap technology for research, monitoring and recreation. Often camera traps need to be placed along vehicle tracks or in obvious locations to detect animal activity. Consequently, units are frequently highly visible and therefore easily located by would-be thieves. We describe a field-tested security post design that increases security for both camera traps and data, whilst also offering a means of standardising placement.

Additional keywords: carnivores, tracks.


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