The Health Practitioner's Guide to Climate Change

cover of The Health Practitioner's Guide to Climate Change

Paperback - September 2009 - AU $44.95

The first book to set out what health practitioners can do to prevent the worst impacts of climate change.

There are enormous health benefits from tackling climate change. This is the first book to set out what health practitioners can do to prevent the worst impacts of climate change, to make health services sustainable, and to design healthy, sustainable communities. + Full description

The Health Practitioner's Guide to Climate Change is written by an authoritative group of authors from key organisations in the field, including the Met Office, the Faculty of Public Health, Natural England, the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, the Climate and Health Council, the NHS Sustainable Development Unit, the Health Protection Agency, the University of the West of England, Sustrans and the National Social Marketing Centre.

Foreword by Dr. R.K. Pachauri, Director General, The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) and Chairman, Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)

- Short description

Reviews

"The health of the planet and the health of people are inseparable. This guide makes this vital connection."
Dr Vandana Shiva, renowned environmentalist and author

Details

Paperback | September 2009 | $ 44.95
ISBN: 9781844077298 | 256 pages | 234 x 156 mm
Publisher: Earthscan from Routledge

Features

  • Provides an introduction for health practitioners and students to climate change and its current and future health impacts
  • Describes the relationship between health and the environment
  • Gives facts and figures on greenhouse gas emissions
  • Sets out the huge benefits to health of acting on climate change
  • Explains what health practitioners can do at home, at work and in their organisations
  • Shows how you can support action in communities, nationally and globally.

Authors

Jenny Griffiths is a former health service manager and chief executive who now works independently.

Mala Rao is Director of the first Indian Institute of Public Health, based in Hyderabad.

Fiona Adshead was previously the deputy chief medical officer in the Department of Health for England and the chief government adviser on Health Inequalities.

Allison Thorpe is a Senior Research Associate at Brunel University.