Functional Plant Biology Functional Plant Biology Society
Plant function and evolutionary biology
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Root growth of lupins is more sensitive to waterlogging than wheat

Helen Bramley A B D E , Stephen D. Tyerman A , David W. Turner B and Neil C. Turner C
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, The University of Adelaide (Waite Campus), Plant Research Centre, PMB 1, Glen Osmond, SA 5064, Australia.

B School of Plant Biology, M084, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.

C Centre for Legumes in Mediterranean Agriculture, M080 and The UWA Institute of Agriculture, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.

D Present address: The UWA Institute of Agriculture, M082, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia.

E Corresponding author. Email: helen.bramley@uwa.edu.au

Functional Plant Biology 38(11) 910-918 https://doi.org/10.1071/FP11148
Submitted: 27 June 2011  Accepted: 28 August 2011   Published: 30 September 2011

Abstract

In south-west Australia, winter grown crops such as wheat and lupin often experience transient waterlogging during periods of high rainfall. Wheat is believed to be more tolerant to waterlogging than lupins, but until now no direct comparisons have been made. The effects of waterlogging on root growth and anatomy were compared in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) and yellow lupin (Lupinus luteus L.) using 1 m deep root observation chambers. Seven days of waterlogging stopped root growth in all species, except some nodal root development in wheat. Roots of both lupin species died back progressively from the tips while waterlogged. After draining the chambers, wheat root growth resumed in the apical region at a faster rate than well-drained plants, so that total root length was similar in waterlogged and well-drained plants at the end of the experiment. Root growth in yellow lupin resumed in the basal region, but was insufficient to compensate for root death during waterlogging. Narrow-leafed lupin roots did not recover; they continued to deteriorate. The survival and recovery of roots in response to waterlogging was related to anatomical features that influence internal oxygen deficiency and root hydraulic properties.

Additional keywords: aerenchyma, anatomy, Lupinus angustifolius, Lupinus luteus, Triticum aestivum.


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