CSIRO Publishing blank image blank image blank image blank imageBooksblank image blank image blank image blank imageJournalsblank image blank image blank image blank imageAbout Usblank image blank image blank image blank imageShopping Cartblank image blank image blank image You are here: Journals > Sexual Health   
Sexual Health
Journal Banner
  Publishing on sexual health from the widest perspective
 
blank image Search
 
blank image blank image
blank image
 
  Advanced Search
   

Journal Home
About the Journal
Editorial Committee
Contacts
Content
Online Early
Current Issue
Just Accepted
All Issues
Special Issues
Sample Issue
For Authors
General Information
Instructions to Authors
Submit Article
Open Access
For Referees
Referee Guidelines
Review an Article
Annual Referee Index
For Advertisers
For Subscribers
Subscription Prices
Customer Service

blue arrow e-Alerts
blank image
Subscribe to our Email Alert or RSS feeds for the latest journal papers.

red arrow Connect with us
blank image
facebook twitter youtube

red arrow Interview with Kit Fairley
blank image
Hear Kit Fairley speak about what is sexual health.

 

Article << Previous     |     Next >>   Contents Vol 7(2)

Preference and practices relating to lubricant use during anal intercourse: implications for rectal microbicides

Marjan Javanbakht A C, Ryan Murphy A, Pamina Gorbach A, Marc-André LeBlanc B, Jim Pickett B

A School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, University of California, Los Angeles, Box 957353, 10880 Wilshire Boulevard, Suite 1800, Los Angeles, CA 90095-7353, USA.
B International Rectal Microbicide Advocates, 411 South Wells Street, Suite 300, Chicago, IL 60607, USA.
C Corresponding author. Email: javan@ucla.edu
 
PDF (152 KB) $25
 Export Citation
 Print
  


Abstract

Background: The importance of the acceptability of rectal microbicides for HIV and sexually transmissible infections (STIs) prevention is widely recognised. Given relatively consistent use of lubricants for anal intercourse (AI) and the potential for lubricant-like rectal microbicides, understanding barriers to lubricant use may help inform hurdles likely to be encountered once a rectal microbicide becomes available. Methods: We conducted an internet-based survey using a 25-item questionnaire to assess AI and lubricant use, including lubricant preferences and barriers to use. Results: The majority of the 6124 respondents who reported AI were male (93%), 25 years or older (80%) and from North America (70%). Consistent condom use during AI was reported by a minority (35%) and consistent lubricant use was reported by over half of respondents. Reasons for non-use differed by age and region. Among men, those <25 years were more likely to report barriers around cost compared with those 45 and older (odds ratio (OR) = 6.64; 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.14–14.03). European men (OR = 1.92; 95% CI 1.50–2.45), Latin American women (OR = 3.69; 95% CI 1.27–10.75) and Asian women (OR = 4.04; 95% CI 1.39–11.78) were more likely to report sexual preference as a reason for non-use. Conclusions: Rectal lubricants are widely used, but barriers to use vary by age and region for dry sex. A lubricant-like rectal microbicide would potentially be acceptable and such a product may be useful as a method of HIV prevention. However, targeted marketing and educational approaches may be needed to enhance use and acceptability of such a product.

Keywords: condoms, HIV, safer sex, STIs, survey.


   
Subscriber Login
Username:
Password:  

    
Legal & Privacy | Contact Us | Help

CSIRO

© CSIRO 1996-2014