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Article     |     Next >>   Contents Vol 28(4)

Improving management strategies for the red fox by using projection matrix analysis

S. R. McLeod and G. R. Saunders

Wildlife Research 28(4) 333 - 340
Published: 15 November 2001

Abstract

The absolute and relative contribution to the finite rate of increase of specific age classes was examined using projection matrix sensitivity and elasticity analysis for a number of red fox (Vulpes vulpes) populations. The fox populations that were examined included urban foxes from England, rural foxes from North America and rural foxes from Australia. The youngest age classes made the greatest contribution to the finite rate of increase for all populations studied. A pest management strategy that reduces survivorship and fertility of juvenile and young adult foxes (Age Classes 1 and 2) will be the most effective strategy for reducing a population’s finite rate of increase. The results indicate that fertility control may be as effective as lethal methods for controlling some fox populations.



Full text doi:10.1071/WR00104

© CSIRO 2001

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