Emu Emu Society
Journal of BirdLife Australia
ROWLEY REVIEW

Identifying crucial gaps in our knowledge of the life-history of avian influenza viruses – an Australian perspective

Marcel Klaassen A B C , Bethany J. Hoye B and David A. Roshier A
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A Centre for Integrative Ecology, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Deakin University, Locked Bag 20000, Geelong, VIC 3220, Australia.

B Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Department of Animal Ecology, PO Box 50, 6700 AB Wageningen, the Netherlands.

C Corresponding author. Email: marcel.klaassen@deakin.edu.au

Emu 111(2) 103-112 https://doi.org/10.1071/MU10042
Submitted: 2 June 2010  Accepted: 22 November 2010   Published: 3 May 2011

Abstract

We review our current knowledge of the epidemiology and ecology of avian influenza viruses (AIVs) in Australia in relation to the ecology of their hosts. Understanding the transmission and maintenance of low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses deserves scientific scrutiny because some of these may evolve to a high-pathogenic AIV (HPAI) phenotype. That the HPAI H5N1 has not been detected in Australia is thought to be a result of the low level of migratory connectivity between Asia and Australia. Some AIV strains are endemic to Australia, with Australian birds acting as a reservoir for these viruses. However, given the phylogenetic relationships between Australian and Eurasian strains, both avian migrants and resident birds within the continent must play a role in the ecology and epidemiology of AIVs in Australia. The extent to which individual variation in susceptibility to infection, previous infections, and behavioural changes in response to infection determine AIV epidemiology is little understood. Prevalence of AIVs among Australian avifauna is apparently low but, given their specific ecology and Australian conditions, prevalence may be higher in little-researched species and under specific environmental conditions.

Additional keywords: ecology, epidemiology, host species, HPAI, LPAI, migration, wild birds.


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