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International Journal of Wildland Fire welcomes papers on basic and applied aspects of wildland fire science including, but not confined to, ecological impact, modelling fire and its effects, and management of fire. More

Editors in Chief: Susan G. Conard and Stefan Doerr

 
 
 

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Published online 11 April 2014
Dynamics of moisture content in spruce–feather moss and spruce–Sphagnum organic layers during an extreme fire season and implications for future depths of burn in Clay Belt black spruce forests 
Aurélie Terrier, William J. de Groot, Martin P. Girardin and Yves Bergeron

We assessed the moisture dynamics in spruce–feather moss and spruce–Sphagnum organic soil layers during an extreme fire season. We used this information to project the effects of climate change on potential depth of burn in these stands. Results suggest that climate change will increase depth of burn in spruce–feather moss stands, but not in spruce–Sphagnum stands.

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Published online 09 April 2014
Experimental modelling of crown fire initiation in open and closed shrubland systems 
Watcharapong Tachajapong, Jesse Lozano, Shankar Mahalingam and David R. Weise

The effect of varying wind speed on the transition of surface fire to live shrub crown fuel composed of chamise was studied in an open-topped wind tunnel. Increasing wind speed from 1.5 to 1.8 m s–1 enhanced heat transfer to the crown fuel, promoting crown fire ignition and spread.

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Published online 09 April 2014
A fire weather index as a basis for an early warning system in Spain 
A. Mestre and M. I. Manta

Wildfires currently represent one of the most critical environmental concerns that Spain has to face. This study aims at evaluating the potential economic savings that can be obtained by the use of a meteorological fire risk index to decide when to adopt fire preventive actions in two zones of Spain.

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Published online 09 April 2014
Assessing the quality of forest fuel loading data collected using public participation methods and smartphones 
Colin J. Ferster and Nicholas C. Coops

A smartphone application to assess the amount of fuel in a wildland–urban interface area was used by volunteers with varying levels of forest measurement experience and the data quality was evaluated. We conclude that the approach was successful and if implemented may lead to improved fire management decision making.

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Published online 09 April 2014
Predicting the number of daily human-caused bushfires to assist suppression planning in south-west Western Australia 
M. P. Plucinski, W. L. McCaw, J. S. Gould and B. M. Wotton

Negative binomial models predicting the daily number of bushfires occurring within management regions of south-west Western Australia were developed and tested with data from incident records. The models had reasonable fits but did not show enough prediction variation to be of practical use in areas with few fires.

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Published online 09 April 2014
Wildfire evacuation and its alternatives: perspectives from four United States 
Sarah McCaffrey, Alan Rhodes and Melanie Stidham

Alternatives to mass evacuation during a wildfire are being increasingly considered in the United States. We examine how individuals in four communities considering an alternative assess the issues. The tension between increasing safety and reducing uncertainty for emergency responders versus for residents is a key consideration in choosing a preferred strategy.

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Published online 09 April 2014
Exploring the use of economic evaluation in Australian wildland fire management decision-making 
Helena Clayton, Melinda R. Mylek, Jacki Schirmer, Geoffrey J. Cary and Stephen R. Dovers

We present findings from a survey of the Australian wildland fire sector on the actual and potential role of economics in supporting wildland fire management decisions. Analysis of the survey results informed several recommendations on ways to improve the integration of economics into wildland fire management.

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Published online 08 April 2014
Methodology to obtain isochrones from large wildfires 
F. Manzano-Agugliaro, J. Pérez-Aranda and J. L. De La Cruz

A methodology to obtain isochrones at different stages of a wildfire through temporal georeferencing of aerial fire photographs is proposed. This methodology has been applied to two large wildfires (1098 and 4609 ha) that occurred in Spain. This study revealed a rate of propagation much higher than expected.

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Published online 03 April 2014
Future fire danger climatology for Tasmania, Australia, using a dynamically downscaled regional climate model 
Paul Fox-Hughes, Rebecca Harris, Greg Lee, Michael Grose and Nathan Bindoff

Daily values of fire danger for Tasmania, Australia, were generated using a regional climate model at ~10-km resolution, for 1961–2100. Regional and seasonal changes in the occurrence of high fire danger were evident over time, and days with pressure patterns associated with high fire danger became more frequent.

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Published online 03 April 2014
Is fire exclusion in mountain big sagebrush communities prudent? Soil nutrient, plant diversity and arthropod response to burning 
Kirk W. Davies, Jon D. Bates, Chad S. Boyd and Aleta M. Nafus

Fire has been excluded from many high elevation sagebrush communities because of current management policies. Fire, however, may be important in these ecosystems. We found that fire creates spatial and temporal heterogeneity in soil nutrients, arthropods and plant diversity. This suggests that fire exclusion may have some negative effects and that management may need to include infrequent fire.

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Published online 31 March 2014
Effect of patches of woody vegetation on the role of fire in tropical grasslands and savannas 
Frank van Langevelde, Casper de Groot, Thomas A. Groen, Ignas M. A. Heitkönig and Ian Gaigher

In tropical grasslands and savannas, fire is used to reduce woody vegetation expansion. Woody vegetation in these biomes is often patchily distributed with unknown consequences for fire effects. Tree seedlings at the leeward side of wooded patches were less affected by fire, suggesting a ‘safe zone’ promoting woody vegetation expansion.

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Published online 31 March 2014
Predicting delay in residents’ decisions on defending v. evacuating through antecedents of decision avoidance 
Ilona M. McNeill, Patrick D. Dunlop, Timothy C. Skinner and David L. Morrison

Many residents of at-risk areas delay committing to defence or evacuation as their response to wildfire threat. This study compared several plausible causes of decision delay and determined that householders’ delay was best predicted by the difference in perceived values of defending v. evacuating, resulting in decision delay when both options get closer in attractiveness.

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Published online 24 March 2014
Wildland firefighter safety zones: a review of past science and summary of future needs 
B. W. Butler

The scientific basis for wildland firefighter safety zone guidelines is summarised. Experimental and theoretical studies are reviewed. Current understanding is evaluated within the context of a selection of wildland fire entrapments. Recommendations are presented for additional work needed to more completely address the question of what constitutes an effective wildland firefighter safety zone.

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Published online 21 March 2014
Understanding evacuation preferences and wildfire mitigations among Northwest Montana residents 
Travis Paveglio, Tony Prato, Douglas Dalenberg and Tyron Venn

This study explores the evacuation preferences of Flathead County, Montana, US residents at risk from wildfire. We found differences in the performance of vegetation management among residents who plan to evacuate or remain at home. Evacuation preferences can be partially explained by characteristics such as demographics.

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Published online 17 March 2014
Application and validation of visual fuel hazard assessments in dry Mediterranean-climate woodlands 
Carl R. Gosper, Colin J. Yates, Suzanne M. Prober and Georg Wiehl

Visual fuel assessments can be used to parameterise fire behaviour models. Vesta visual fuel assessments in eucalypt woodlands were strongly correlated with quantitative measurements, indicating that visual assessments adequately captured time-since-fire changes in fuel. Issues limiting the wider application of the Vesta methodology were mainly associated with differences between communities in their responses to fire.

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Published online 07 March 2014
Post-fire recovery of an endemic Canarian pine forest 
J. R. Arévalo, S. Fernández-Lugo, A. Naranjo-Cigala, M. Salas, R. Ruíz, R. Ramos and M. Moreno

In the Canary Islands, wildfires are recurrent in pine forests, and have been reported by the media as an ecological disaster. We investigated fire effect on vegetation and soil nutrients in a well-preserved Canarian pine forest. Results indicated positive effects of fire, such as increased soil organic matter and forest regeneration 4 years after fire.

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Published online 07 March 2014
Modelling canopy fuel variables for Pinus radiata D. Don in NW Spain with low-density LiDAR data 
Eduardo González-Ferreiro, Ulises Diéguez-Aranda, Felipe Crecente-Campo, Laura Barreiro-Fernández, David Miranda and Fernando Castedo-Dorado

We evaluated the potential use of very low-density airborne LiDAR data (0.5 first returns m–2), which is freely available for most of the Spanish territory, to estimate canopy fuel characteristics in Pinus radiata stands in north-western Spain.

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Published online 07 March 2014
Structure and composition of forest floor fuels in long-unburned Jeffrey pine–white fir forests of the Lake Tahoe Basin, USA 
Erin M. Banwell and J. Morgan Varner

Forest floor (litter, fermentation and humus) load, composition, depth, bulk density and mineral content were studied in Jeffrey pine–white fir forests. Forest floor fuels varied spatially in relation to distance from tree boles. The structural and compositional diversity in these fuels underscores our need to better understand forest floor fuels.

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Published online 07 March 2014
Forest fuel management for wildfire prevention in Spain: a quantitative SWOT analysis 
Eva Marino, Carmen Hernando, Rosa Planelles, Javier Madrigal, Mercedes Guijarro and Ana Sebastián

The role of forest fuel management for wildfire prevention in Spain was assessed by means of a quantitative SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis. Existing obstacles hindering the implementation of effective fuel management are identified and preliminary recommendations are provided to overcome them.

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Published online 07 March 2014
Effects of fire on carbon fluxes of a calcareous grassland 
Andrej Vončina, Mitja Ferlan, Klemen Eler, Franc Batič and Dominik Vodnik

The aim of the study was to investigate, using the canopy chamber method, the effect of fire on the recovery of grassland vegetation in terms of C fluxes from and to the ecosystem. Two years of investigation showed that the grassland under study can recover quite quickly after fire, although the dynamics of recovery are largely dependent on water availability.

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Published online 07 March 2014
A field experiment on grass fire effects on wooden constructions and peat layer ignition 
A. M. Grishin, A. I. Filkov, E. L. Loboda, V. V. Reyno, A. V. Kozlov, V. T. Kuznetsov, D. P. Kasymov, S. M. Andreyuk, A. I. Ivanov and N. D. Stolyarchuk

The results of a field experiment for grass fire propagation and the effects on wooden constructions and peat layers are provided. Fire characteristics and conditions for wooden construction ignition are investigated. Practical recommendations are given to minimise the probability of grass fires spreading to wooden constructions.

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Published online 07 March 2014
Mapping the daily progression of large wildland fires using MODIS active fire data 
Sander Veraverbeke, Fernando Sedano, Simon J. Hook, James T. Randerson, Yufang Jin and Brendan M. Rogers

We developed an approach to derive continuous maps of daily fire progression using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) active fire and thermal anomaly data. The method outperformed the temporal reporting accuracy of two MODIS burnt area products. Remote sensing data on fire progression have the potential to improve our understanding of climate and vegetation controls fire behaviour and emissions.

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Published online 07 March 2014
Trend analysis of medium- and coarse-resolution time series image data for burned area mapping in a Mediterranean ecosystem 
Thomas Katagis, Ioannis Z. Gitas, Pericles Toukiloglou, Sander Veraverbeke and Rudi Goossens

Time series of low-resolution satellite imagery were analysed with the use of the Breaks for Additive Seasonal and Trend (BFAST) method. Trend changes were identified after a fire event in southern Greece, resulting in the mapping of the burned area and illustration of the post-fire vegetation recovery trend.

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Published online 21 February 2014
Relationship between fire-return interval and mulga (Acacia aneura) regeneration in the Gibson Desert and Gascoyne–Murchison regions of Western Australia 
Bruce G. Ward, Thomas B. Bragg and Barbara A. Hayes

Central Australia has experienced many large summer fires over the past five to six decades. However, over the last two decades increased rainfall promoted herbs and soft grasses and resulted in higher fire frequency. This study documents the relationship between fire return interval and mulga regeneration.

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Published online 06 February 2014
Defining extreme wildland fires using geospatial and ancillary metrics 
Karen O. Lannom, Wade T. Tinkham, Alistair M.S. Smith, John Abatzoglou, Beth A. Newingham, Troy E. Hall, Penelope Morgan, Eva K. Strand, Travis B. Paveglio, John W. Anderson and Aaron M. Sparks

This study explores four metrics to describe both widespread fire years and potentially extreme individual fires derived from a case study of wildland fires from 1984 to 2009 in the north-western United States. A combination of percentile-based thresholds is used for each of the metrics to define individual fires as extreme events.

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Published online 15 August 2013
Monitoring post-fire vegetation recovery in the Mediterranean using SPOT and ERS imagery 
A. Polychronaki, I. Z. Gitas and A. Minchella

Burned areas were investigated ~20 years after fire events in Greece. Results indicated that the synergy of multi-temporal optical and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images could provide valuable information for monitoring long-term post-fire vegetation recovery.

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Published online 25 July 2013
Development and mapping of fuel characteristics and associated fire potentials for South America 
M. Lucrecia Pettinari, Roger D. Ottmar, Susan J. Prichard, Anne G. Andreu and Emilio Chuvieco

This research proposes a process to generate a fuel map for large areas, using the Fuel Characteristic Classification System. Fuelbeds were built to represent fuels across the continent of South America. Fire potentials including indexed values of surface fire behaviour, crown fire and available fuels were computed and mapped, enabling users to assess fire hazard, predict fire behaviour and calculate fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions.

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Published online 08 March 2013
Assessment of fire selectivity in relation to land cover and topography: a comparison between Southern European countries 
Sandra Oliveira, Francisco Moreira, Roberto Boca, Jesús San-Miguel-Ayanz and José M. C. Pereira

This study investigates the selectivity of fire in relation to land cover type and topography in Southern Europe. Shrubland and grassland are more fire prone, whereas agricultural areas and artificial surfaces are less susceptible to burn. There are significant differences between countries and regions. Slopes >25% and north facing ones were less fire prone.

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Published online 22 October 2012
Integrating geospatial information into fire risk assessment 
E. Chuvieco, I. Aguado, S. Jurdao, M. L. Pettinari, M. Yebra, J. Salas, S. Hantson, J. de la Riva, P. Ibarra, M. Rodrigues, M. Echeverría, D. Azqueta, M. V. Román, A. Bastarrika, S. Martínez, C. Recondo, E. Zapico and F. J. Martínez-Vega

This paper presents a method to generate fire risk maps making extensive use of geographic information technologies. It describes how the variables were generated and integrated, and how the final index was validated using two years of fire occurrence.

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blank image International Journal of Wildland Fire
Volume 23 Number 2 2014

 
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Outstanding Associate Editor Award 2013: Bonita L. McFarlane 
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pp. i-i
 
 

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Hydrologic and erosion responses to wildfire along the rangeland–xeric forest continuum in the western US: a review and model of hydrologic vulnerability 
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C. Jason Williams, Frederick B. Pierson, Peter R. Robichaud and Jan Boll
pp. 155-172

This paper reviews the potential hydrologic and erosion consequences of increased wildfire activity associated with cheatgrass invasions, plant community transitions and warming climate along the rangeland–xeric forest continuum in the western United States. A conceptual model of post-fire hydrologic vulnerability and risk is presented and key knowledge gaps that limit post-fire risk assessment are identified.

 
  
 

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Forecasting fire activity in Victoria, Australia, using antecedent climate variables and ENSO indices 
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Sarah Harris, Neville Nicholls and Nigel Tapper
pp. 173-184

Can bushfire activity be forecast using climate variables? We review the relationship between fire activity, climate variables and El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) for the fire-prone state of Victoria, Australia. The results reveal the potential to use climate variables and ENSO indices to forecast the upcoming season’s potential bushfire activity.

 
  
 |    Corrigendum PDF (1.6 MB) - $25.00  
 

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Changes in forest fire danger for south-western China in the 21st century 
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Xiao-rui Tian, Feng-jun Zhao, Li-fu Shu and Ming-yu Wang
pp. 185-195

Future changes in the fire danger rating and the forest fire season were predicted for south-western China under two scenarios. The fire season will be prolonged by an average of 28–31 days and potential burnt areas will increase by 19–23% by the end of this century.

 
  
 

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Characterising weather patterns associated with fire in a seasonally dry tropical forest in southern India 
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Nandita Mondal and Raman Sukumar
pp. 196-201

We examined the predictability of fire days in a seasonally dry tropical forest in southern India using weather parameters. Fire days were more likely with low rainfall in the early dry season, low relative humidity and high temperatures during the dry season. We provide a quantitative framework for fire risk assessment for this forest type.

 
    | Supplementary Material (394 KB)
 

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An evaluation of fire danger and behaviour indices in the Great Lakes Region calculated from station and gridded weather information 
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John D. Horel, Robert Ziel, Chris Galli, Judith Pechmann and Xia Dong
pp. 202-214

A website integrates weather, fire danger and fire behaviour information for the Great Lakes region of the United States. Applications of this Great Lakes Fire and Fuels System are demonstrated and evaluated for the 2012 fire season.

 
  
 

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Mapping day-of-burning with coarse-resolution satellite fire-detection data 
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Sean A. Parks
pp. 215-223

It is often necessary to know what day any given area has burned to allow for incorporating daily weather data into fire-related analyses. I evaluated several methods for interpolating coarse-resolution day-of-burning satellite data into fine-resolution maps. The resulting maps showed reasonably high quantitative and qualitative agreement with fire progression data.

 
  
 

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Estimation of forest structure and canopy fuel parameters from small-footprint full-waveform LiDAR data 
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Txomin Hermosilla, Luis A. Ruiz, Alexandra N. Kazakova, Nicholas C. Coops and L. Monika Moskal
pp. 224-233

Knowledge of fuel conditions is critical to accurately forecast fire behaviour. We present a methodology to estimate forest canopy fuel parameters using small-footprint, full-waveform light detection and ranging (LiDAR) airborne data in a mixed forest region of north-west Oregon (US).

 
  
 

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Fire regime shift linked to increased forest density in a piñon–juniper savanna landscape 
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Ellis Q. Margolis
pp. 234-245

Tree-ring reconstructions reveal historically frequent, low-severity fires (mean fire interval = 7.8 years, ≥2 sites scarred) and low tree densities (mean = 135 trees ha–1) in a piñon–juniper savanna in the south-western USA. This differs dramatically from (1) current conditions and (2) other piñon–juniper ecosystems containing less grass cover.

 
  
 

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Songbird response to wildfire in mixed-conifer forest in south-western Oregon 
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Nathaniel E. Seavy and John D. Alexander
pp. 246-258

We evaluated the effects of a 2500-ha wildfire on bird abundance in a southern Oregon mixed-conifer forest. Over 4 years after the fire, birds associated with conifer tree canopy decreased and birds associated with broadleaf shrubs increased.

 
  
 

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Large airtanker use and outcomes in suppressing wildland fires in the United States 
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David E. Calkin, Crystal S. Stonesifer, Matthew P. Thompson and Charles W. McHugh
pp. 259-271

We integrate multiple datasets to characterise the use of large airtankers in fire suppression efforts on federal land for the conterminous United States in 2010 and 2011. Results confirm earlier work suggesting extensive use of large airtankers on extended attack, despite policy stating priority for use in initial attack. Further, results suggest that initial attack success rates for fires with large airtanker use are relatively low compared with the success rate on all wildfires.

 
  
 

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Air tanker drop patterns 
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Dominique Legendre, Ryan Becker, Elise Alméras and Amélie Chassagne
pp. 272-280

Ground patterns of liquid aerial drops for combating wildfires (airplanes and helicopters) are considered. Based on a significant number of drop tests, a simple model for the length, the width and the coverage distribution is presented. The difference between gravity systems and recent pressurised systems is also discussed.

 
  
 

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Social preferences for fuel break management programs in Spain: a choice modelling application to prevention of forest fires 
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Elsa Varela, Marek Giergiczny, Pere Riera, Pierre-Alexandre Mahieu and Mario Soliño
pp. 281-289

This article presents an economic valuation study of several aspects related to the management of fuel break networks. It shows how citizens’ welfare is influenced by eventual changes in fuel break management programs that have to do with the cleaning techniques employed, the design and overall, with the potential to reduce fire risk.

 
  
 

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Corrigendum to: Forecasting fire activity in Victoria, Australia, using antecedent climate variables and ENSO indices 
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Sarah Harris, Neville Nicholls and Nigel Tapper
pp. 290-293
 
 |    Corrigendum PDF (1.6 MB) - $25.00  
 

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These articles have been peer reviewed and accepted for publication. They are still in production and have not been edited, so may differ from the final published form.

    WF14009  Accepted 09 April 2014
    Fuel reduction burning mitigates wildfire impacts on forest carbon and greenhouse gas emission
    Liubov Volkova, C.P. (Mick) Meyer, Simon Murphy, Thomas Fairman, Fabienne Reisen, Christopher Weston
    Abstract


    WF12194  Accepted 07 April 2014
    Simulation and thermal imaging of the 2006 Esperanza Wildfire in southern California: Application of a coupled weather-wildland fire model
    Janice Coen, Philip (Phil) Riggan
    Abstract


    WF13160  Accepted 28 March 2014
    High-Resolution Observations of Combustion in Heterogeneous Surface Fuels
    Eva (Louise) Loudermilk, Gary Achtemeier, Joseph OBrien, John Hiers, Benjamin Hornsby
    Abstract


    WF13188  Accepted 21 March 2014
    Holocene fire in Fennoscandia and Denmark
    Jennifer Clear, Chiara Molinari, Richard Bradshaw
    Abstract


    WF13048  Accepted 22 March 2014
    Social Science Research on Indigenous Wildfire Management in the 21st Century and Future Research Needs
    Amy Christianson
    Abstract


    WF13043  Accepted 21 March 2014
    Biomass dynamics of central Siberian Scots pine forests following surface fires of varying severity
    Elena Kukavskaya, Galina Ivanova, Susan G. Conard
    Abstract


    WF13206  Accepted 20 March 2014
    An accuracy assessment of the MTBS burned area product for shrub-steppe fires in the northern Great Basin, United States
    Aaron Sparks, Luigi Boschetti, Wade Tinkham, Alistair Smith, Karen Lannom, Beth Newingham
    Abstract


    WF13080  Accepted 20 March 2014
    Numerical prediction of size, mass, temperature and trajectory of cylindrical, wind driven firebrands
    Luis Oliveira, Antonio Manuel Lopes, Bantwal Baliga, Miguel Almeida, Domingos Viegas
    Abstract


    WF13147  Accepted 12 March 2014
    Ignition and fire behavior of Juniperus virginiana in response to live fuel moisture and fire temperature in the southern Great Plains
    John Weir, Derek Scasta
    Abstract


    WF13077  Accepted 12 March 2014
    The Effect of Forest Fire on Mass Movement in Lebanese mountainous areas
    Rouba Ziade, Chadi Abdallah, Nicolas Baghdadi
    Abstract


    WF13042  Accepted 07 March 2014
    Use of Night-Vision Goggles for Aerial Forest Fire Detection
    Linda Tomkins, Tetyana Benzeroual, Andrew Milner, James Zacher, Mike Ballagh, Robert (Rob) McAlpine, Tim Doig, Sion Jennings, Greg Craig, Robert Allison
    Abstract


    WF13159  Accepted 04 March 2014
    The temporal evolution of wildfire ash and implications for post-fire infiltration.
    Victoria Balfour, Peter Robichaud, Stefan Doerr
    Abstract


    WF13108  Accepted 03 March 2014
    A ‘responsibility for place’ – firefighter deployment, local knowledge and risk
    Tarnya Kruger, Ruth Beilin
    Abstract


    WF13084  Accepted 03 March 2014
    Equilibrium moisture content and timelag of dead Pinus pinaster needles
    Sérgio Lopes, Domingos Viegas, Maria Viegas, Luís de Lemos
    Abstract


    WF13074  Accepted 24 February 2014
    Simulated western spruce budworm defoliation reduces torching and crowning potential: A sensitivity analysis using a physics-based fire model
    Gregory Cohn, Russ Parsons, Emily Heyerdahl, Daniel Gavin, Aquila Flower
    Abstract


    WF13045  Accepted 24 February 2014
    Flammability of litter sampled according to two different methods: comparison of results in laboratory experiments.
    Anne Ganteaume, Marielle Jappiot, Thomas Curt, Corinne Lampin, Laurent Borgniet
    Abstract


    WF13168  Accepted 04 February 2014
    Diet of the silky mouse (Pseudomys apodemoides) and the heath rat (P. shortridgei) in a post-fire environment
    Julian Di Stefano, Amanda Ashton, Alan York
    Abstract


    WF13130  Accepted 04 February 2014
    Cost shared wildfire risk mitigation in Log Hill Mesa, Colorado: Survey evidence on participation and willingness to pay
    James Meldrum, Patty Champ, Travis Warziniack, Hannah Brenkert-Smith, Chris Barth, Lilia Falk
    Abstract


    WF13106  Accepted 04 February 2014
    A quantitative study of the Proximity of Satellite Detected Active Fires to Roads and Rivers in the Brazilian Tropical Moist Forest Biome
    Sanath Kumar, David Roy, Mark Cochrane, Carlos Souza Jr, Christopher Barber, Luigi Boschetti
    Abstract


    WF13062  Accepted 04 February 2014
    Carnivore Distributions across Chaparral Habitats Exposed to Wildfire and Rural Housing in Southern California
    Paul Schuette, James Diffendorfer, Douglas Deutschman, Scott Tremor, Wayne Spencer
    Abstract


    WF13127  Accepted 04 February 2014
    Decoupling seasonal changes in water content and dry matter to predict live conifer foliar moisture content
    William Jolly, Ann Hadlow, Kathleen Huguet
    Abstract


    WF13063  Accepted 04 February 2014
    A methodology for determining operational priorities for prevention and suppression of wildland fires
    Francisco Rodr�guez y Silva, Juan Molina Martínez, Armando Gonzalez-Caban
    Abstract


    WF12201  Accepted 04 February 2014
    Exposing hidden value trade-offs; sharing wildfire management responsibility between government and citizens
    Blythe McLennan, Michael Eburn
    Abstract


    WF12101  Accepted 22 January 2014
    Assessing the temporal pattern of fire activity and weather variability in Lebanon
    Liliane Salloum, George Mitri
    Abstract


    WF13104  Accepted 14 January 2014
    Area burned in Portugal over the last decades: an extreme value analysis
    Manuel Scotto, Sonia Gouveia, Anabela Carvalho, Alexandra Monteiro, Vera Martins, Mike Flannigan, Jesús San-Miguel-Ayanz, Ana Isabel Miranda, Carlos Borrego
    Abstract


    WF13089  Accepted 14 January 2014
    Modern fire regime resembles historical fire regime in a ponderosa pine forest on Native American lands
    Amanda Stan, Peter Fule, Kathryn Ireland, Jamie Sanderlin
    Abstract


    WF12197  Accepted 02 January 2014
    Experimental Confirmation of the MWIR and LWIR Greybody Assumption for Vegetation Fire Flame Emissivity
    Joshua Johnston, Martin Wooster, Tim Lynham
    Abstract




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Rank Paper Details
1. Published 29 August 2013
Community safety during the 2009 Australian 'Black Saturday' bushfires: an analysis of household preparedness and response

Joshua Whittaker, Katharine Haynes, John Handmer and Jim McLennan

2. Published 24 October 2013
Allowing a wildfire to burn: estimating the effect on future fire suppression costs

Rachel M. Houtman, Claire A. Montgomery, Aaron R. Gagnon, David E. Calkin, Thomas G. Dietterich, Sean McGregor and Mark Crowley

3. Published 24 October 2013
Is burn severity related to fire intensity? Observations from landscape scale remote sensing

Heather Heward, Alistair M. S. Smith, David P. Roy, Wade T. Tinkham, Chad M. Hoffman, Penelope Morgan and Karen O. Lannom

4. Published 4 February 2014
Is fire severity increasing in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA?

Chad T. Hanson and Dennis C. Odion

5. Published 4 February 2014
Dead fuel moisture research: 1991–2012

Stuart Matthews

6. Published 25 July 2013
Large eddy simulation of atypical wildland fire spread on leeward slopes

Colin C. Simpson, Jason J. Sharples, Jason P. Evans and Matthew F. McCabe

7. Published 19 June 2013
Assessing the effect of foliar moisture on the spread rate of crown fires

Martin E. Alexander and Miguel G. Cruz

8. Published 29 August 2013
Effects of salvage logging and pile-and-burn on fuel loading, potential fire behaviour, fuel consumption and emissions

Morris C. Johnson, Jessica E. Halofsky and David L. Peterson

9. Published 29 August 2013
Fire weather simulation skill by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model over south-east Australia from 1985 to 2009

Hamish Clarke, Jason P. Evans and Andrew J. Pitman

10. Published 24 October 2013
Relationships between climate and macroscale area burned in the western United States

John T. Abatzoglou and Crystal A. Kolden

11. Published 2 December 2013
Comparing three sampling techniques for estimating fine woody down dead biomass

Robert E. Keane and Kathy Gray

12. Published 4 February 2014
Can precipitation influence landscape controls on wildfire severity? A case study within temperate eucalypt forests of south-eastern Australia

L. Collins, R. A. Bradstock and T. D. Penman

13. Published 25 July 2013
Historical fire–climate relationships of upper elevation fire regimes in the south-western United States

Ellis Q. Margolis and Thomas W. Swetnam

14. Published 13 May 2013
The importance of affect, perceived risk and perceived benefit in understanding support for fuels management among wildland–urban interface residents

Timothy J. Ascher, Robyn S. Wilson and Eric Toman

15. Published 24 October 2013
The relationship of large fire occurrence with drought and fire danger indices in the western USA, 1984–2008: the role of temporal scale

Karin L. Riley, John T. Abatzoglou, Isaac C. Grenfell, Anna E. Klene and Faith Ann Heinsch

16. Published 4 February 2014
Current status and future needs of the BehavePlus Fire Modeling System

Patricia L. Andrews

17. Published 24 October 2013
Examination of the wind speed limit function in the Rothermel surface fire spread model

Patricia L. Andrews, Miguel G. Cruz and Richard C. Rothermel

18. Published 21 March 2014
Estimation of forest structure and canopy fuel parameters from small-footprint full-waveform LiDAR data

Txomin Hermosilla, Luis A. Ruiz, Alexandra N. Kazakova, Nicholas C. Coops and L. Monika Moskal

19. Published 29 August 2013
Living in a tinderbox: wildfire risk perceptions and mitigating behaviours

Patricia A. Champ, Geoffrey H. Donovan and Christopher M. Barth

20. Published 29 August 2013
Soil heating during burning of forest slash piles and wood piles

Matt D. Busse, Carol J. Shestak and Ken R. Hubbert


      
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