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Article << Previous     |     Next >>   Contents Vol 41(1)

Locating species range frontiers: a cost and efficiency comparison of citizen science and hair-tube survey methods for use in tracking an invasive squirrel

Emily A. Goldstein A B C D , Colin Lawton C , Emma Sheehy C and Fidelma Butler B

A Environmental Research Institute, Lee Road, Cork, Ireland.
B School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.
C Department of Zoology, National University of Ireland Galway, Galway, Ireland.
D Corresponding author. Email: emilyagoldstein@gmail.com

Wildlife Research 41(1) 64-75 http://dx.doi.org/10.1071/WR13197
Submitted: 10 May 2013  Accepted: 9 April 2014   Published: 19 May 2014


 
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Abstract

Context: Improved knowledge of changing species distributions is critically important for conservation managers in the face of increasing species invasions, habitat disturbance and climate change. Efficient monitoring of the location of advancing species invasion frontiers is especially crucial for effective species community and habitat management.

Aims: To compare the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of two survey methods, a citizen science survey and a traditional hair-tube survey, in their abilities to locate the current southern invasion frontier of grey squirrels (Sciurus carolinensis) in Ireland.

Methods: In the citizen science survey, we collected sighting reports of the grey squirrel and its native congener, the red squirrel (S. vulgaris), from the geographic region of the invasion frontier from untrained members of the public over a 2-year period. Hair-tube surveys were carried out in 14 woodlands (≥30 ha) in the same geographic area to test the ability of this indirect field method to identify colonising grey squirrel populations. The costs, efficiency and cost-effectiveness of each method were compared.

Key results: The citizen science sighting reports resulted in the clear delineation of the southern frontier of the zone invaded by the grey squirrel. The hair-tube survey ascertained the presence of grey squirrels in 4 of 14 sites, but did not detect this species close to the invasion frontier defined by the citizen science survey. Even though the total cost of the citizen science survey was higher, it was more cost-effective and efficient on a per detection basis for the purposes of detecting the presence of grey and red squirrels.

Conclusions: The citizen science survey detected invasive squirrels in sites where the hair-tube survey did not. As such, the citizen science survey provided a more comprehensive snapshot of the location of the grey squirrel invasion frontier more efficiently and cost-effectively than did traditional field techniques.

Implications: In the face of increasing ecological and economic costs of biological invasions, we recommend straightforward citizen science surveys, over indirect field surveys, to managers and researchers seeking to efficiently track progressing invasions of readily observable animals cost-effectively.



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