CSIRO Publishing logo   blank image
You are here: Books > New Releases   
 
blank image Search
 
blank image blank image
blank image
 
  Advanced Search
   
Books Home
New Releases
Forthcoming Releases
On Sale
Series
Publishing Partners
How to Order
For Authors
eBooks

blue arrow e-Alerts
blank image
Subscribe to our Email Alert or RSS feeds RSS

red arrow Connect with us
blank image
facebook twitter youtube

red arrow eBooks
blank image
Learn more about our eBooks program and retail partners.

ebooks

Flooded Forest and Desert Creek

Enlarge Cover

 

Flooded Forest and Desert Creek

Ecology and History of the River Red Gum

Matthew Colloff   CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences

Colour Paintings, Maps, Photographs, Line Art
344 pages, 245 x 170 mm
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing


    Hardback - August 2014
ISBN: 9780643109193 - AU $ 69.95

Our eBooks are available from  
  ebooks.com   Google Books   amazon.com   Kobo
or other retailers

 
 
The river red gum has the most widespread natural distribution of Eucalyptus in Australia, forming extensive forests and woodlands in south-eastern Australia and providing the structural and functional elements of important floodplain and wetland ecosystems. Along ephemeral creeks in the arid Centre it exists as narrow corridors, providing vital refugia for biodiversity.

The tree has played a central role in the tension between economy, society and environment and has been the subject of enquiries over its conservation, use and management. Despite this, we know remarkably little about the ecology and life history of the river red gum: its longevity; how deep its roots go; what proportion of its seedlings survive to adulthood; and the diversity of organisms associated with it.

More recently we have begun to move from a culture of exploitation of river red gum forests and woodlands to one of conservation and sustainable use. In Flooded Forest and Desert Creek, the author traces this shift through the rise of a collective environmental consciousness, in part articulated through the depiction of river red gums and inland floodplains in art, literature and the media.

Listen to Matthew Colloff interviewed by Lauren Fitzgerald on ABC Rural.

 
 

 The river red gum has the most widespread natural distribution of Eucalyptus in Australia, forming extensive forests and woodlands in south-eastern Australia and providing the structural and functional elements of important floodplain and wetland ecosystems. Along ephemeral creeks in the arid Centre it exists as narrow corridors, providing vital refugia for biodiversity.

The tree has played a central role in the tension between economy, society and environment and has been the subject of enquiries over its conservation, use and management. Despite this, we know remarkably little about the ecology and life history of the river red gum: its longevity; how deep its roots go; what proportion of its seedlings survive to adulthood; and the diversity of organisms associated with it.

More recently we have begun to move from a culture of exploitation of river red gum forests and woodlands to one of conservation and sustainable use. In Flooded Forest and Desert Creek, the author traces this shift through the rise of a collective environmental consciousness, in part articulated through the depiction of river red gums and inland floodplains in art, literature and the media.

 

 
  • Looks at the ecology and life history of the most widely distributed Eucalyptus species in Australia
  • An account of the importance of river red gum forests and woodlands as part of Country and Law for Aboriginal people; the uses of the tree in the context of cultural history and traditional knowledge
  • Documents the threats and changes in river red gum landscapes and environment since European settlement
  • Richly illustrated with photographs, maps and colour paintings
 

 Foreword
Acknowledgements
Preface
Introduction
Part 1. The Unfolding Forest
Chapter 1. Floodplain and River
Chapter 2. Names and Relationships
Chapter 3. Life History
Chapter 4. The River Red Gum as an Ecosystem Engineer
Part 2. Forces of Change
Chapter 5. Fire
Chapter 6. Grazing
Chapter 7. Timber Harvesting
Chapter 8. Flood, Drought and River Regulation
Part 3. From Exploitation to Conservation and Multiple Values
Chapter 9. River Red Gum Consciousness
Chapter 10. Conservation and Multiple Values
Chapter 11. The Future of the River Red Gum
Notes
Bibliography
Index
 

 People with an interest in Australian landscape ecology and history; especially readers who identify with those parts of the country shaped by rivers, floodplains and wetlands.

Though technical in parts, the book is intended to be accessible to a general audience, as well as to ecologists, conservationists and environmental managers.

 

 "I’m possibly biased in that I’ve long been on the record as describing the River Red Gum as my favourite tree, but this book is something special...It is a fascinating account at all levels, very readable and rich in photos and illustrations. A very valuable addition to the shelf and desk of anyone interested in this land."
Ian Fraser, ABC Canberra, September 2014

"a strong, well-researched and well-written scientific account"
Sydney Morning Herald, October 2014

"this is a study of importance not just to environmental managers, ecologists, policy-makers, conservationists, or historians, but to all Australians who are connected or who are seeking a connection to a particular landscape"
Ruth A. Morgan, Australian Book Review, November 2014, pp. 15-16

 

 Matthew Colloff is a Principal Research Scientist with CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences. He currently researches floodplain ecosystem function and biodiversity. He has worked on ecosystem services, soil nutrient cycling, restoration of degraded agricultural landscapes, environmental weeds, and the interface between natural resource management science, policy and practice. His interests are in how ecosystems work, how they are changing, and what we can do about managing them. 

Related Titles
 Plant Life on the Sandplains in Southwest Australia    Vegetation Survey and Assessment    Booderee National Park    Making Better Fertiliser Decisions for Cropping Systems in Australia    Australasian Nature Photography    Crops for a Future Climate    Urban Ecosystems  

  
 


 
return to top of pageTop  email this page Email this page
 
Legal & Privacy | Contact Us | Help

CSIRO

© CSIRO 1996-2014