CSIRO Publishing blank image blank image blank image blank imageBooksblank image blank image blank image blank imageJournalsblank image blank image blank image blank imageAbout Usblank image blank image blank image blank imageShopping Cartblank image blank image blank image You are here: Journals > Australian Journal of Physics   
Australian Journal of Physics
Journal Banner
  A journal for the publication of original research in all branches of physics
 
blank image Search
 
blank image blank image
blank image
 
  Advanced Search
   

Journal Home
Content
Online Early
Current Issue
Just Accepted
All Issues
Special Issues

 

Article << Previous     |     Next >>   Contents Vol 51(2)

Hyperfine Magnetic Fields for Os, Ir and Pt in Iron: Pre-equilibrium Effects, Domain Rotation and the Aharoni Effect

A. E. Stuchbery and E. Bezakova

Australian Journal of Physics 51(2) 183 - 200
Published: 1998

Abstract

Hyperfine fields acting on subnanosecond excited states of impurity nuclei recoil-implanted into ferromagnetic hosts are being studied. These measurements are sensitive to effects on the picosecond time-scale that accompany implantation as well as to phenomena of longer duration. We review our recent work, mainly on 5d impurities implanted into iron, which has concerned: (i) the behaviour of the transient field at low recoil velocities, (ii) the dependence (magnitude and direction) of the hyperfine field on the applied field, (iii) the site distribution of the implanted nuclei, and (iv) the time the static field takes to reach equilibrium after implantation. It is found that the static hyperfine field takes about 10 ps after implantation to reach equilibrium. Once equilibrium is established the internal fields may be misaligned with respect to the direction of the external field, but this is associated with domain rotation in an incompletely saturated sample rather than with the ‘Aharoni effect’.



Full text doi:10.1071/P97059

© CSIRO 1998

blank image
 
 PDF (265 KB)
 Export Citation
 Print
  
    
Legal & Privacy | Contact Us | Help

CSIRO

© CSIRO 1996-2015