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Article << Previous     |     Next >>   Contents Vol 48(12)

Host plant resistance in grain crops and prospects for invertebrate pest management in Australia: an overview

H. Gu A E F, O. R. Edwards B, A. T. Hardy C, G. P. Fitt D

A CSIRO Entomology, GPO Box 1700, Canberra, ACT 2601, Australia.
B CSIRO Entomology, Floreat, WA 6014, Australia.
C Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries, PO Box 102, Toowoomba, Qld 4350, Australia.
D CSIRO Entomology, 120 Meiers Road, Indooroopilly, Qld 4068, Australia.
E Present address: Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries, 80 Meiers Road, Indooroopilly, Qld 4068, Australia.
F Corresponding author. Email: hainan.gu@dpi.qld.gov.au
 
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Abstract

An integrated pest management (IPM) approach that relies on an array of tactics is adopted commonly in response to problems with pesticide-based production in many agricultural systems. Host plant resistance is often used as a fundamental component of an IPM system because of the generally compatible, complementary role that pest-resistant crops play with other tactics. Recent research and development in the resistance of legumes and cereals to aphids, sorghum midge resistance, and the resistance of canola varieties to mite and insect pests have shown the prospects of host plant resistance for developing IPM strategies against invertebrate pests in Australian grain crops. Furthermore, continuing advances in biotechnology provide the opportunity of using transgenic plants to enhance host plant resistance in grains.

   
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