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Protocols in ecological and environmental plant physiology

 

Article << Previous     |     Next >>   Contents Vol 54(4)

Myxomycetes on the bark of Banksia attenuata and B. menziesii (Proteaceae)

C. C. Jordan A, M. H. Brims B, E. J. Speijers C, E. M. Davison A D

A Department of Environmental Biology, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia.
B CALM, WA Herbarium, Locked Bag 104, Bentley Delivery Centre, WA 6983, Australia.
C Department of Agriculture and Food Western Australia, Locked Bag 4, Bentley Delivery Centre, WA 6983, Australia.
D Corresponding author. Email: E.Davison@curtin.edu.au
 
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Abstract

Myxomycetes on the bark of dead Banksia attenuata and B. menziesii from the Perth metropolitan area of Western Australia were surveyed by the moist chamber technique, to determine whether the flora was similar on both hosts and what were the most important variables that determined the distribution of the most common species. Twenty-seven species of myxomycetes were recovered, including six new records for Australia (Comatricha rigidireta, Echinostelium elachiston, Paradiacheopsis cf. cribrata, P. rigida, Stemonitopsis amoena and S. cf. hyperopta). Members of the order Stemonitales comprised the largest number of species, whereas members of the Liceales occurred on the most bark pieces. The most common species were Licea kleistobolus, Echinostelium minutum, Comatricha elegans, Cribraria minutissima and Paradiacheopsis fimbriata. Overall, B. menziesii and B. attenuata had very similar myxomycete productivity, diversity and species assemblage, as did the tops and bottoms of the logs. It was concluded that they provided very similar microhabitats for myxomycetes. Both pH and the relative moisture content of the bark had an effect on myxomycete productivity. Bark decomposition level, pH and bark surface (top or bottom) were the most important variables determining the distribution of the most common myxomycete species.

   
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