Australian Mammalogy Australian Mammalogy Society
Journal of the Australian Mammal Society
RESEARCH ARTICLE

Foxes in trees: a threat for Australian arboreal fauna?

Valentina S. A. Mella A C , Clare McArthur A , Robert Frend B and Mathew S. Crowther A
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

A School of Life and Environmental Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia.

B 9 Tennant Court, Gunnedah, NSW 2380, Australia.

C Corresponding author. Email: valentina.mella@sydney.edu.au

Australian Mammalogy - https://doi.org/10.1071/AM16049
Submitted: 16 September 2016  Accepted: 29 January 2017   Published online: 13 February 2017

Abstract

We document the first evidence of tree climbing by red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) in Australia. Camera traps recorded foxes in trees on the Liverpool Plains, New South Wales. This finding prompts a reassessment of the impact that this invasive predator has on Australian fauna: from purely terrestrial to also potentially arboreal.

Additional keywords: camera trapping, exotic predator, feathertail glider, koala, tree climbing.


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