Australian Journal of Botany Australian Journal of Botany Society
Southern hemisphere botanical ecosystems

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Anatomy and function of the root system of bromeliad Nidularium minutum

José Carvalho , Adriana Hayashi , Shoey Kanashiro , Armando Tavares

Abstract

Anatomy and function of the root system of bromeliad Nidularium minutum Short running title: Anatomy and function of bromeliad root system José L. Carvalho A, Adriana H. HayashiB, Shoey KanashiroB and Armando R. TavaresB,C AUniversidade Cruzeiro do Sul, Av. Doutor Ussiel Cirilo 225, São Paulo 08060-070, Brazil. BInstituto de Botânica, Av. Miguel Stéfano 3687, São Paulo 04301-902, Brazil. CCorresponding author. Email: atavares2005@yahoo.com.br The authors declare no conflicts of interest Abstract. The root anatomy of bromeliad Nidularium minutum Mez was studied and the efficiency of root system in contributing to the growth, development and mineral uptake of the species evaluated. To accomplish this analysis, four treatments were applied, as follows: Control plants with 5 ml H2O on substrate and 5 ml H2O into tank; plants supplied with nutrients to the tank with 5 ml H2O on substrate and 5 ml Hoagland and Arnon solution into tank; plants supplied with nutrients to the roots with 5 ml HA on substrate and 5 ml H2O into tank; and plants supplied with nutrients to the tank and roots with 5 ml HA on substrate and 5 ml HA into tank. Biometric variables and biomass were measured. Contents of macro and micronutrients were evaluated in leaves, and the anatomical structure of roots was analyzed. Structurally, roots have multiseriate epidermis, termed velamen, which is typical in Orchidaceae and other families for uptaking water and nutrients. Plants supplied with nutrients to the roots had higher values than Control plants for fresh and dry mass of stems, leaves and total (leaves+stems+roots), besides being more efficient than plants supplied with nutrients to the tank for nitrogen uptake. These results indicate that root system of N. minutum is very efficient for nutrients uptake when compared to the tank contributing to plant growth and development, most likely assisted by the presence of velamen.

BT17121  Accepted 02 October 2017

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