Journal of Primary Health Care Journal of Primary Health Care Society
Journal of The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners
RESEARCH ARTICLE (Open Access)

Reasons for use and non-use of the pertussis vaccine during pregnancy: an interview study

Natalie J. Gauld 1 2 , Crystal S. Braganza 1 , Ola O Babalola 1 , Tung T Huynh 1 , Sarah M Hook 1
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

1 School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

2 Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

Correspondence to: Dr Natalie J. Gauld, Department of General Practice and Primary Health Care, Morrin Rd, St Johns, Auckland 1072, New Zealand. Email: n.gauld@auckland.ac.nz

Journal of Primary Health Care 8(4) 344-350 https://doi.org/10.1071/HC15049
Published: 21 December 2016

Journal Compilation © Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners 2016.
This is an open access article licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: In New Zealand, pertussis vaccination is recommended and government-funded during every pregnancy to protect the infant after birth. However, uptake is low and needs to be increased.

AIM: To investigate enablers and barriers for uptake of the pertussis vaccination by pregnant women in New Zealand, and explore the acceptability of provision in pharmacies.

METHODS: Women with infants were recruited in selected pharmacies and interviewed using a brief structured interview. Transcripts were analysed using a framework approach.

RESULTS: Thirty-seven women aged 18–43 years provided data for analysis. Seventeen women reported receiving a pertussis vaccination during their pregnancy. Information from health professionals appeared important to encourage vaccination, but other sources of information (eg antenatal groups and media) were also cited. Non-vaccination arose from being unaware of the need for pertussis vaccination during pregnancy, concerns about safety, and misinformation. Participants supported pertussis vaccination in pharmacies to help access or increase the opportunity for health professionals to inform women.

DISCUSSION: The information received by participants affected their uptake of the pertussis vaccine during pregnancy. Education of the public and health professionals about the pertussis vaccine during pregnancy is necessary.


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