Journal of Primary Health Care Journal of Primary Health Care Society
Journal of The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners
RESEARCH ARTICLE (Open Access)

Standing order use in general practice: the views of medicine, nursing and pharmacy stakeholder organisations

Robyn Taylor 1 , Eileen McKinlay 2 , Caroline Morris 2
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

1 Karori Medical Centre, Karori, Wellington, New Zealand

2 Department of Primary Health Care & General Practice, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand

Correspondence to: Robyn Taylor, PO Box 17-264, Karori Wellington, New Zealand. Email: robyn.taylor@kmc.co.nz

Journal of Primary Health Care 9(1) 47-55 https://doi.org/10.1071/HC16023
Published: 10 February 2017

Journal Compilation © Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners 2017.
This is an open access article licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Standing orders are used by many general practices in New Zealand. They allow a practice nurse to assess patients and administer and/or supply medicines without needing intervention from a general practitioner.

AIM: To explore organisational strategic stakeholders’ views of standing order use in general practice nationally.

METHODS: Eight semi-structured, qualitative, face-to-face interviews were conducted with participants representing key primary care stakeholder organisations from nursing, medicine and pharmacy. Data were analysed using a qualitative inductive thematic approach.

RESULTS: Three key themes emerged: a lack of understanding around standing order use in general practice, legal and professional concerns, and the impact on workforce and clinical practice. Standing orders were perceived to extend nursing practice and seen as a useful tool in enabling patients to access medicines in a safe and timely manner.

DISCUSSION: The variability in understanding of the definition and use of standing orders appears to relate to a lack of leadership in this area. Leadership should facilitate the required development of standardised resources and quality assurance measures to aid implementation. If these aspects are addressed, then standing orders will continue to be a useful tool in general practice and enable patients to have access to health care and, if necessary, to medicines without seeing a general practitioner.

KEYWORDS: General practice; general practitioner, nurse, pharmacist, primary health care, standing orders


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