Journal of Primary Health Care Journal of Primary Health Care Society
Journal of The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners
RESEARCH ARTICLE (Open Access)

Clinical leadership: what is it and how do we facilitate it?

Robin Gauld
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

1 Dean’s Department, School of Business, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

Correspondence to: Robin Gauld, Dean’s Department, School of Business, University of Otago, PO Box 56, Dunedin 9054, New Zealand. Email: robin.gauld@otago.ac.nz

Journal of Primary Health Care 9(1) 5-8 https://doi.org/10.1071/HC16041
Published: 10 February 2017

Journal Compilation © Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners 2017.
This is an open access article licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Abstract

Clinical leadership has been on the New Zealand policy agenda since the launch of the 2009 In Good Hands report, yet performance in supporting its development has been variable. The 2016 New Zealand Health Strategy renews the emphasis on clinical leadership, but with few details for what this is, what the expectations are and how clinical leadership might be supported. This article backgrounds the field and provides some pointers for policymakers and the sector if New Zealand is to take the lead on clinical leadership.


References

[1]  Travaglia J, Debono D, Spigelman A, Braithwaite J. Clinical governance: a review of key concepts in the literature. Clinical Governance: An International Journal. 2011; 16 62–77.
Clinical governance: a review of key concepts in the literature.CrossRef |

[2]  Angood P, Birk S. The value of physician leadership. Tampa, FL: American College of Physician Executives; 2014.

[3]  Bohmer RMJ. Leadership with a small “l”. BMJ 2010; 340 c483
Leadership with a small “l”.CrossRef |

[4]  Clark J. Medical leadership and engagement: no longer an optional extra. J Health Organ Manag. 2012; 26 437–43.
Medical leadership and engagement: no longer an optional extra.CrossRef |

[5]  The King’s Fund. Leadership and engagement for improvement in the NHS. London: The King's Fund; 2012.

[6]  Health and Disability Commissioner. Annual report for the year ended 30 June 2015. Wellington: Health and Disability Commissioner; 2015.

[7]  Scally G, Donaldson L. Clinical governance and the drive for quality improvement in the new NHS in England. BMJ 1998; 317 61–5.
Clinical governance and the drive for quality improvement in the new NHS in England.CrossRef | 1:STN:280:DyaK1czhs1ajtw%3D%3D&md5=3b8f8ecb0eecb974dba39b44ab27f831CAS |

[8]  Minister of Health. New Zealand Health Strategy: future direction. Wellington: Ministry of Health; 2016.

[9]  Nicol E. Improving clinical leadership and management in the NHS. J Healthc Leadersh. 2012; 1 59–69.

[10]  Stanton E, Lemer C, Mountford J, editors. Clinical leadership: bridging the divide. London: Quay Books; 2009.

[11]  Morrow G, Burford B, Redfern N, Briel R, Illing J. Does specialty training prepare doctors for senior roles? A questionnaire study of new UK consultants. Postgrad Med J. 2012; 88 558–65.
Does specialty training prepare doctors for senior roles? A questionnaire study of new UK consultants.CrossRef |

[12]  Gauld R, Horsburgh S. Clinical Governance Assessment Project: final report on a National Health Professional Survey and site visits to 19 New Zealand DHBs. Dunedin: Centre for Health Systems, University of Otago; 2012.

[13]  Gauld R, Horsburgh S, Brown J. The Clinical Governance Development Index: results from a New Zealand study. BMJ Qual Saf. 2011; 20 947–52.
The Clinical Governance Development Index: results from a New Zealand study.CrossRef |

[14]  Dorgan S, Layton D, Bloom N, Homkes R, Sadun R, Van Reenen J. Management in healthcare: why good practice really matters. London: McKinsey and Company/London School of Economics; 2010.

[15]  Goodall AH. Physician-leaders and hospital performance: is there an association? Soc Sci Med. 2011; 73 535–9.
Physician-leaders and hospital performance: is there an association?CrossRef |

[16]  Ministerial Task Group on Clinical Leadership. In good hands: transforming clinical governance in New Zealand. Wellington: Ministerial Task Group on Clinical Leadership; 2009.

[17]  Ryall T. Clinical leadership ‘In Good Hands’. Ministerial Press Release. 12 March 2009. Wellington: Ministry of Health; 2009.

[18]  Gauld R. Revolving doors: New Zealand’s health reforms - the saga continues. Wellington: Institute of Policy Studies and Health Services Research Centre; 2009.

[19]  Laugesen M, Gauld R. Democratic governance and health: hospitals, politics and health policy in New Zealand. Dunedin: Otago University Press; 2012.

[20]  Coleman J. Speech to Association of Salaried Medical Specialists Annual Conference, Wellington. 19 November 2015. Wellington: Ministry of Health; 2015.

[21]  Gauld R. Are elected health boards an effective mechanism for public participation in health service governance? Health Expect 2010; 13 369–78.
Are elected health boards an effective mechanism for public participation in health service governance?CrossRef |

[22]  Mintzberg H. The structure of organizations. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall; 1979.

[23]  Bolman L, Gallos J. Reframing academic leadership. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass; 2011.


Full Text PDF (1.1 MB) Export Citation

View Altmetrics