Journal of Primary Health Care Journal of Primary Health Care Society
Journal of The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners
RESEARCH ARTICLE (Open Access)

General Practitioners providing obstetric care in New Zealand. What differentiates GPs who continue to deliver babies?

Zara Mason 1 , Chrys Jaye 1 , Dawn Miller 1

1 Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, University of Otago, New Zealand

2 University of Otago, Department of General Practice and Rural Health, New Zealand

Correspondence to: Dr Chrys Jaye, University of Otago, Department of General Practice and Rural Health, Otago, New Zealand. Email: chrystal.jaye@otago.ac.nz

Journal of Primary Health Care 9(1) 9-15 https://doi.org/10.1071/HC16046
Published: 7 March 2017

Journal Compilation © Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners 2017.
This is an open access article licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Abstract

AIM: To identify factors that have enabled some New Zealand general practitioner obstetricians (GPOs) to continue providing maternity care and factors implicated in decisions to withdraw from maternity care.

METHOD: Semi-structured interviews and one focus group (n = 3) were conducted with 23 current and former GPOs. Interviews were transcribed and analysed thematically.

RESULTS: Current and former GPOs practiced maternity care because they enjoyed being involved in the birth process and delivery suite environment. Their maternity practice was framed by a philosophy of lifelong continuity of care for patients.

CONCLUSION: GPOs still practicing in New Zealand do so because they find maternity care highly rewarding despite their perceptions that the current maternity care model is incompatible with general practice. They have often developed local solutions that support their practice, particularly around shared care arrangements.

Keywords: Obstetric; maternity; general practice


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