Journal of Primary Health Care Journal of Primary Health Care Society
Journal of The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners
RESEARCH ARTICLE (Open Access)

Navigating payer heterogeneity in the United States: lessons for primary care

Winston Liaw 1 , Daniel McCorry 2 3 , Andrew Bazemore 1
+ Author Affiliations
- Author Affiliations

1 Robert Graham Center, Northwest, Washington, DC, USA

2 Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA

3 Current address: McLeod Regional Medical Centre, Florence, SC, USA

Correspondence to: Winston Liaw, 1133 Connecticut Avenue, NW; Suite 1100, Washington, DC 20036, USA. Email: wliaw@aafp.org

Journal of Primary Health Care 9(3) 200-203 https://doi.org/10.1071/HC17024
Published: 15 August 2017

Journal Compilation © Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners 2017.
This is an open access article licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Abstract

With most providers accepting private and public funding, the US exemplifies hybridization, which results in both systemic benefits and harms. While this practice stimulates innovation, encourages practices to be efficient, and increases choice, it has also been linked to gaps in patient safety and overtreatment. We propose three lessons from the US for navigating a public and private system: hybridization allows for innovation; hybridization leads to administrative complexity; and if the costs of participation outweigh the benefits, practices may undergo dehybridization.


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