Plant Life on the Sandplains in Southwest Australia

cover of Plant Life on the Sandplains in Southwest Australia

Paperback - October 2014 - AU $69.99

Southwest Australia is a region increasingly recognised for its high levels of biodiversity and endemism.

Southwest Australia is a region increasingly recognised for its high levels of biodiversity and endemism, and was recognized in 2000 as one of the world’s twenty-five ‘biodiversity hotspots’ based largely on its highly diverse, endemic and threatened flora. + Full description

Plant Life on the Sandplains in Southwest Australia: A global biodiversity hotspot has been assembled with current research and understanding about the south-western Australian flora, the greatest richness of which is on the sandplain, especially on the most nutrient-impoverished soils. The thirty-nine contributors include leading scientists and early-career researchers dealing with issues on the environment, biodiversity, speciation and phylogenetics, ecosystem composition and coevolution.

To be able to conserve threatened species, the animals that depend upon them, and the habitats they live in, we need to understand their functioning in the past and present, to protect them for the future.

This is a thorough revision and expansion of Kwongan – Plant Life of the Sandplain (Pate & Beard, 1984), and demonstrates how much knowledge and understanding of kwongan has been gained over the past thirty years. Aboriginal knowledge of plant life on the sandplains was and is profound, and this basis of understanding is included in this beautifully illustrated book.

- Short description

Details

Paperback | October 2014 | $ 69.99
ISBN: 9781742585642 | 350 pages | 297 x 210 mm
Publisher: University of Western Australia Press

Authors

Hans Lambers is Professor of Plant Biology at The University of Western Australia. From 2002–2012 he was Head of the School of Plant Biology at The University of Western Australia. In 2006, he started the Kwongan Foundation for the Conservation of Australian Native Biodiversity.

Lambers completed his PhD at the University of Groningen, the Netherlands, before taking up postdoc positions at The University of Western Australia, Melbourne University, and the Australian National University. He has published more than 300 scientific journal articles and book chapters, and is the lead author of an authoritative textbook, Plant Physiological Ecology (1998, 2008; translated in Chinese and Persian). He has been Editor-in-Chief of the journal Plant and Soil since 1992. He served as Secretary General of the Federation of European Societies of Plant Physiology (1992–1996) and as President of the Australian Society of Plant Scientists (2001–2003). He holds an Honorary Professorship at China Agricultural University, Beijing, China. He has been elected Fellow of the Dutch Academy of Sciences (1997), Fellow of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (2003), and Fellow of the Australian Academy of Science (2012).