Birds of the Wet Tropics of Queensland and Great Barrier Reef and Where to Find Them

Cover featuring illustrations of various birds.

Paperback - December 2015 - AU $45.00

An easy-to-use field guide to the birds of tropical Far North Queensland.

Unlike conventional field guides which arrange birds in taxonomic order, the most obvious feature of this regional field guide "plus" allows birders to easily identify birds by their colour, habits or habitats. + Full description

Illustrations are accurately painted by the author, BirdLife Australia Hobbs Medallist, Lloyd Nielsen.

Researchers seeking the definitive reference tool will find the Status and Range section invaluable as it describes the current status and range of the 451 species of bird recorded in these two World Heritage Areas.

The Field Guide section (206 pages) includes distribution maps and arranges birds according to their colour and most obvious feature such as "long" tail, some straited plumage, brown or appears brownish, yellow or buff rump, all-white head, black and white plumage, as well as habits such as wags or quivers tail, hovers, forages on tree trunks and limbs, spends much time in the air and so on. Also described in the Field Guide section are groups of birds such as shorebirds and some resident freshwater waders, diurnal birds of prey, nocturnal birds, terns, gulls, seabirds, quail and button-quail and the true aerial birds (swifts, swiftlets, swallows, martins).

85 pages are devoted to birds difficult-to-identify, some of which, for example, egrets, Black-shouldered and Letter-winged Kites, the four species of grey gerygone, Leaden, Satin and Broad-billed Flycatchers, Bassian and Russet-tailed Thrush are also found in other parts of Australia. Some groups of birds difficult-to-identify groups include egrets, the three "yellow-spotted" honeyeaters, gerygones, Bronze-cuckoos, scrubwrens, friarbirds, swiftlets, flycatchers.

Current research highlights the unanswered questions about species such as the "Herberton" Honeyeater, cicadabirds, Pacific Swallow, and a probable new species of Quail-thrush.

Best birding areas from Cooktown to Townsville include regional maps and birds likely to be seen at each site.

- Short description

Details

Paperback | December 2015 | $ 45.00
ISBN: 9780957988156 | 398 pages
Publisher: Lloyd Nielsen